Times Square Press Synopsis and Credits

Posted on 7th May 2017 in "Times Square"
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This was sold as a “Press Kit,” but it’s just the one sheet of A4-size paper with a very complete synopsis of the film on one side and the full cast and credits on the other. It was definitely used for publicity purposes in the UK, but the logo on it is the one that was used in the British advertisements and movie posters. The actual UK Press Kit documents used the American logo. This must have been made and distributed later than the Press Kit.

There was no synopsis in the UK Press Kit, at least not in my copy. There was one in the US Press Kit, and it’s significantly different. Where most of the contents of the UK Press Kit are taken almost directly from the US versions, this synopsis is almost certainly the work of a different synopsizer. Most strangely, although the logo implies it was produced later, some of the details in it make it seem that whoever wrote it was working not from the film but from an earlier version of the screenplay, or at least an earlier cut of the film. For instance, this page has Nicky pulling a switchblade on the police who come to arrest her outside the disco. The May 1979 script has her attacking the “roadies” from the club with a switchblade. There is no switchblade in the movie, or in the US Press Kit synopsis. It also mentions the famously-removed sequence by/in the Hudson River, although it describes them becoming “blood sisters” during it while in the May 1979 screenplay that happens on the pier, like it does in the movie.

TIMES SQUARE

SYNOPSIS

(Not for Publication)

42nd Street is one of New York’s busiest – it leads to Times Square, the centre of the city’s nightlife and filled with colourful characters. Winos, pimps, prostitutes and junkies rub their sordid shoulders with the thousands of tourists and sightseers out funseeking to catch the infectious atmosphere of the heart of “the Big Apple”.

Noisily trundling a shopping cart, filled with her guitar, amplifier and battery, along 42nd Street is 16-year-old Nicky Marotta (ROBIN JOHNSON), a girl who has lived most of her life on these rough and lively streets.

Outside a disco she plugs in her guitar and begins to play her own music against the thumping beat from within. When a hostess from the disco calls the police, they arrive to be faced with a stream of four-letter words and Nicky’s switchblade.

On the other side of town in a posh East Side apartment Pamela Pearl (TRINI ALVARDO) sits alone, tuned in to the mellow words and music of all-night disc jockey Johnny LaGuardia (TIM CURRY).

Now in custody and recognised as a habitual offender, Nicky is in the charge of Rosie (ANNA MARIA HORSFORD), a concerned social worker who tells her that she is to be taken to hospital to see if there is any psychological reason for her anti-social behaviour.

The next day Pamela’s father, David Pearl (PETER COFFIELD), a widower and rising politician, takes Pamela to a public meeting where he is to outline his newest assignment – as the Mayor’s Commissioner to clean up Times Square. His dedication to his career and lack of attention to his introverted young daughter have made him unable to recognise her loneliness and mental anguish. When she finds herself on the meeting platform beside her father she is mortified with embarrassment and when David refers to her in his speech, she bolts for the ladies’ rest room in tears.

"Times Square" Screenplay by Jacob Brackman, 1979, p. 48  Text:  47  EXT THE HUDSON RIVERSIDE	AFTERNOON  MUSIC. NICKY has’already spray painted out the Hopkins Center markings on the ambulance. She has also  sprayed slogans from her songs all over the van.  NICKY has sprayed. "Nah, nah, nah, nah, nah . . down the side of the van, over the ground and now up  PAMELA'S leg.  They wrestle for the can. PAMELA escapes an armlock and presses NICKY into a full Nelson against the van.  NICKY is surprised and impressed.  EXT POLICE HEADQUARTERS, MANHATTAN	DUSK  MUSIC. City of New York limousines and Hopkins Center vehicles are parked at the entrance. ROSIE HAUSE arrives in a cab.  EXT THE HUDSON RIVERSIDE 	DUSK  MUSIC. NICKY kneels before a hubcap full of thick, red goo she has mixed. PAMELA watches, fascinated.  NICKY cups the stuff in her palms and smooths it into her own hair. It is henna, a primitive hair dye.  Next, she rubs an equal amount into PAMELA'S hair, sensually at first. Their mood turns playful. They  plaster each other with henna and quickly look like gargoyles.  EXT THE ALLIED CHEMICAL BUILDING	EVENING  MUSIC. On the roof, next to the neon WJAD logo, JOHNNY, alone, scans his domain with a high powered  telescope on a tripod.Anxious for a speedy solution to the inconvenience of having a sick daughter, Pearl agrees to his doctor’s recommendation that she should undergo tests at the hospital to see if there are psychological reasons for her strange behaviour.

Thus Nicky and Pamela meet… as room-mates at the hospital. Nicky’s antics and irreverent behaviour towards the hospital staff shock Pamela at first, but later she begins to be amused and, after a night-time conversation in which Nicky convinces Pamela that there is nothing wrong with either of them, they leave their room together and, stealing a hospital ambulance, escape to a derelict pier where they set up a makeshift home. At the water’s edge they henna their hair, become “blood sisters” and determine to make the city sit up and take notice of them.

Johnny LaGuardia reads the newspaper accounts of the pair’s disappearance and believes Pamela is the girl who wrote to him a few days ago describing her loneliness and fears. He speaks to the runaways over the air, encouraging them in their bid to find their own brand of freedom.

As the days pass Nicky and Pamela engage in a variety of fruitless occupations to make ends meet, narrowly escape recapture by an undercover policeman and finally find employment in a sleazy club on 42nd Street known as “Cleopatra’s Lounge”, Pamela as a go-go dancer and Nicky as a singer with the resident band, The Blondells.

In the meantime David Pearl continues his efforts to find his daughter and makes an enemy of Johnny LaGuardia who, he is convinced knows where Pamela, is and is hampering both his bid to find her and his campaign to clean up the city centre.

In their rejection of many of society’s social values, Pamela and Nicky adopt weird clothes – bits and pieces of sixties mini-skirts and plastic garbage bags and call themselves “The Sleaze Sisters”. They spray graffiti all over town and indulge in a highly individual rampage of destruction by spectacularly destroying dozens of what they regard as the worst social symbol of all.

With reports of their progress being fed out over the airwaves by LaGuardia, “The Sleaze Sisters”, and in particular Nicky who has written a song about herself in very down-to-earth terms, become cult heroines and they even broadcast Nicky’s music live from the radio station.

But events are conspiring to end their great adventure. Nicky insists they go down in a blaze of glory by staging an illegal midnight rock concert atop a cinema marquee.

An explosive climax builds as hundreds of teenage girls, dressed in “Sleaze Sisters” clothing and make-up, stream towards Times Square for the concert. Also making their way there are the police and Pamela’s father…

Running Time: 111 mins, approx.
Certificate ‘AA’

EMI
A Member of the THORN-EMI Group
Released by COLUMBIA-EMI-WARNER Distributors Ltd.

THE CAST

Johnny LaGuardia……….TIM CURRY
Pamela Pearl……….TRINI ALVARADO
Nicky Marotta……….ROBIN JOHNSON
David Pearl……….PETER COFFIELD
Dr. Huber……….HERBERT BERGHOF
Dr.Zymansky……….DAVID MARGULIES
Rosie Washington……….ANNA MARIA HORSFORD
JoJo……….MICHAEL MARGOTTA
Simon……….J.C. QUINN
Roberto……….MIGUEL PINERO
Heavy……….RONALD “SMOKEY” STEVENS
Blondell……….BILLY MERNIT
Blondell……….PAUL SASS
Blondell……….ARTI WEINSTEIN
Eastman……….TIM CHOATE
Disco Hostess……….ELIZABETH PENA
Nurse Joan……….KATHY LOJAC
Nurse May……….SUSAN MERSON
Don Dowd……….GEORGE MORFOGEN
Speaker……….CHARLES BLACKWELL
Stuntplayer……….BILL ANAGNOS
Stuntplayer……….TAMMAS J. HAMILTON
Stuntplayer……….FRANKLYN SCOTT
Stuntplayer……….JANE SOLAR
Stuntplayer……….VICTORIA VANDERKLOOT
Dude……….STEVE W. JAMES
Plainclothes Cop ……….JAY ACOVONE
Magda……….ALICE SPIVAK
George……….CALVIN ANDER
Plainclothes Cop……….PETER IACANGELO
Young D.J……….MICHAEL RINEY
Policeman 1 ……….LOUIS BELERO
Policeman 2……….GERALD KLINE
Hold-Up Man……….BEN SLACK
Beer Vendor……….AARON HURST
Beer Vendor……….SEAN HUST
Shop Owner……….PETER LOPICCOLO
T.V. Drop Kid……….ROGER CAMCAHO
T.V. Drop Kid……….STEVE PABON
Daughter……….DANIELLE TILETNICK
Daughter’s Friend……….DONNA SIROTA
Movie Theatre Reactor……….TULANE HOWARD II
Waitress……….KAREN EVANS
Cigarette Girl……….RODI ALEXANDER
Sleez Bag Vendor 1 ……….RAMON FRANCO
Sleez Bag Vendor 2……….RIKI COLON
Renaissance AKIDE……….MELANIE HENDERSON
Cop On Marquee……….LARRY SILVESTRI
Beer Buyers.. . . PAULA NAPLES, MANDY CAMERON
Intern……….SCOTT P. SANDERS
Andy……….TIGER HAYNES
Sleez Girls……….CAMMI LYNN BUTTNER
SARAH DOUGHERTY, AMY GABRIEL
SANDRA LEE GOGA, PAMELA GOTLIN
SHUNA LYDON, KELLY McCLORY
MARLENA SEDA

THE CREDITS

Produced by……….ROBERT STIGWOOD
JACOB BRACKMAN
Directed by……….ALAN MOYLE
Executive Producers……….KEVIN McCORMICK
JOHN NICOLELLA
Screenplay by……….JACOB BRACKMAN
Story by……….ALAN MOYLE and LEANNEUNGER
Associate Producer……….BILL OAKES
Director of Photography……….JAMES A. CONTNER
Edited by……….TOM PRIESTLEY
Casting……….BARBARA CLAMAN for BCI
Special Casting……….MARGIE SIMKIN
Extras Casting……….LOUIS Di GIAIMO
Production Manager……….JUDITH STEVENS
Assistant Director……….ALAN HOPKINS
2nd Assistant Director……….ROBERT WARREN

THE CREDITS (cont’d)

2nd Unit Directors……….EDWARD BIANCHI
JOHN NICOLELLA
Unit Manager……….LOU FUSARO
Location Manager……….RON STIGWOOD
Camera Operator……….ENRIQUE BRAVO
Assistant Cameraman ……….HANK MULLER
Script Supervisor……….SANDY McLEOD
Makeup Artist……….PETER WRONA, JR.
Hairstylist……….JUDI GOODMAN
Wardrobe Supervisor……….KAREN EIFERT
Stunt Coordinators……….JAMES LOVELETT
ALEX STEVENS
Titles Design……….DAN PERRI
Opticals by ……….MOVIE MAGIC
Filmed in PANAVISION and TECHNICOLOR
and DOLBY STEREO
On Locations in New York City

THE MUSIC

ROCK HARD……….Performed by SUZI QUATRO
Composed by MIKE CHAPMAN & NICKY CHINN
TALK OF THE TOWN Performed by THE PRETENDERS
Composed by CHRISSIE HYNDE
SAME OLD SCENE……….Performed by ROXY MUSIC
Composed by BRYAN FERRY
DANGEROUS TYPE……….Performed by THE CARS
Composed by RIC OCASEK
DOWN IN THE PARK……….
Performed & Composed by GARY NUMAN
HELP ME ! Performed by MARCY LEVY & ROBIN GIBB
Composed by ROBIN GIBB & BLUE WEAVER
LIFE DURING WARTIME……….
Performed by TALKING HEADS
Composed by DAVID BYRNE
PRETTY BOYS……….
Performed & Composed by JOE JACKSON
TAKE THIS TOWN……….Performed by XTC
Composed by ANDY PARTRIDGE
I WANNA BE SEDATED……….
Performed & Composed by The RAMONES
DAMN DOG……….Performed by ROBIN JOHNSON
Composed by BILLY MERNIT and JACOB BRACKMAN
YOUR DAUGHTER IS ONE ……….
Performed by ROBIN JOHNSON & TRINI ALVARADO
Composed by BILLY MERNIT, NORMAN ROSS & JACOB BRACKMAN
BABYLON’S BURNING……….Performed by THE RUTS
Composed by JOHN JENNINGS, DAVE RUFFY
MALCOLM OWEN, PAUL FOX
YOU CAN’T HURRY LOVE . Performed by D. L. BYRON
Composed by HOLLAND, DOZIER, HOLLAND
WALK ON THE WILD SIDE……….
Performed & Composed by LOU REED
THE NIGHT WAS NOT……….
Performed by DESMOND CHILD & ROUGE
Composed by DESMOND CHILD
INNOCENT, NOT GUILTY……….
Performed & Composed by GARLAND JEFFREYS
GRINDING HALT……….Performed by THE CURE
Composed by TOLHURST DEMPSEY SMITH
PISSING IN THE RIVER……….
Performed & Composed by PATTI SMITH
FLOWERS IN THE CITY……….
Performed by DAVID JOHANSEN
& ROBIN JOHNSON
Composed by DAVID JOHANSEN & RONNIE GUY
Additional Music by BLUE WEAVER
Special thanks to JIMMY IOVINE, JOHN PACE and
D. L .BYRON BAND (FOR “DAMN DOG”)

I would say that M.B. was using this synopsis to help his/her own description of the film in the review in the January 1981 Photoplay.

Here, for comparison, is the American synopsis from the US Press Material folder:

TIMES SQUARE

SYNOPSIS

New York City at night. Along 42nd Street in the heart of Times Square, Nicky Marotta (ROBIN JOHNSON) swings aimlessly, a loose and carefree teenager plugged into life and rock music, complete with guitar, and portable amp system. With sudden inspiration, Nicky leans on the alley wall of a disco and against the thumping music from within begins to play her own music, loud and strong. A woman opens the alley door of the disco, berates Nicky for the “noise” which can be heard within, and demands she remove her equipment from the hood of the owner’s parked car. Nicky defiantly responds by smashing the headlights of the car. The woman runs into the club for help.

David Pearl (PETER COFFIELD), a widower consumed with his career as a rising young politician, has lost touch with his daughter, Pamela (TRINI ALVARADO). Unable to see that she is troubled and lonely, he takes Pamela to his newest assignment as the Mayor’s commissioner to clean up Times Square and a speech presenting his “Times Square Renaissance” program. To her dismay, Pamela is seated with her father on the dais and, when her father uses Pamela as the subject of a false and embarrassing story, she is convulsed with mortification and runs to the ladies restroom.

Nicky’s disturbance at the disco brings the police and she is apprehended, then taken in custody to await court and medical decisions.

Pamela, meanwhile, is in her upper East Side high-rise apartment listening to the mellow words and rock music of late-night disc jockey Johnny LaGuardia (TIM CURRY) from his studio high atop a building overlooking Times Square. Pamela hears LaGuardia read a letter she has written to him, a missive of deep anguish and loneliness. On the air, he advises the anonymous letter writer, who signed it “Zombie Girl,” to believe that all people should be very special to themselves and to learn how to “fly.”

Anxious for a solution to his daughter’s apparent neuroticism, David Pearl agrees to his doctor’s recommendations that Pamela be admitted to a hospital for neurological testing to determine if there is an organic reason for her behavior. Pamela meets Nicky in a hospital room they share since both will be undergoing the same psychiatric and physical tests. Nicky has been sent by police officials for the tests, following the recent arrest, her fourth on record.

During the tests by Dr. Huber (HERBERT BERGHOF),Nicky takes charge, raucously and with vulgar answers to his queries, a brazen attitude that fascinates Pamela. Pamela awakens one morning to learn with some sadness that Nicky has been discharged from the medical tests.
Nicky, however, surreptitiously returns to the room and convinces Pamela to join her in a flight to freedom. Impetuously, they run out of the building and commandeer an ambulance for a wild careening drive through the back streets of New York.

Two teenagers, free of responsibility, free in the exciting city of New York, they roam through an abandoned pier in the old city harbor area, and devise a makeshift refuge for shelter. To survive, they engage in a variety of activities—stealing, scrounging for food and clothing. Nicky even fails at an attempted mugging, with Pamela as the decoy, and their try at a sidewalk three-card monte game, fails to hook any suckers. The con game does get them chased by a plain-clothes undercover cop. They escape from him after a harrowing chase through a porno theatre, across its stage, up to the rooftops of buildings, down alleys,and eventually, safety in the subway.

Their next try for income is successful when the owner of a sleazy nitery in Times Square, the Cleopatra Club, is intrigued enough by Pamela’s innocence and refusal to dance topless to hire her as a campy put-on for the amusement of his customers. Nicky also is hired to sing with a back-up group, The Blondells.

Johnny LaGuardia, meanwhile, reads the newspaper accounts and reports of the search for David Pearl’s runaway daughter, believed to be kidnapped by Nicky Marotta, a dangerous delinquent. He makes the connection that Pamela is, in fact, his anonymous, troubled correspondent and on the air begins to encourage the two rebels, urging them to remain free. The publicity turns Pam and Nicky into minor media celebrities with legions of teenage girls their fans.

Nearby, David Pearl is torn between the anxiety over his daughter and his campaign to rehabilitate Times Square. Social worker Rosie Washington (ANNA MARIA HORSFORD), a dedicated civil servant, tries to persuade Pearl that Pamela’s company with Nicky Marotta is not a serious escapade, that Nicky is troubled but not beyond help. Rosie gets a letter filled with understanding to Nicky to ensure Pamela’s eventual and safe return. Pamela also calls her father to assure him she’s alright, and that Nicky needs her.

In their rejection of many of the values of the culture, the girls adopt “bag lady” wardrobes, bits and pieces of the ’60s miniskirts, plastic garbage bags as blouses. And they become “Sleaze Sisters,” when they see their fans’ spray-painted graffiti on a street bus panel advertising Pamela’s disappearance. In their jobs at the Cleo Club, Pamela becomes a favorite attraction, although fully dressed, because of her wild uninhibited gyrations and frenzied dance routines. Nicky also wows the customers with the rock rendition of her own composition, “Damn Dog,” backed up by The Blondells.

Nicky and Pamela then begin a series of exciting but dangerous escapades—dropping television sets from the tops of building to crash amongst unsuspecting pedestrians below. Pamela, now frightened by the behavior, begins to waver in her allegiance and friendship to Nicky. During an interlude in their dangerous pastime, the girls induce Johnny LaGuardia to let them sing on the air for his listeners. LaGuardia’s irresponsibility to the girls’ rebellion and his continuing on-air comments urging them to do their own thing, incenses David Pearl, who storms into LaGuardia’s studio, threatens him and attempts to assault him. To assuage Pearl’s anger, a LaGuardia staff member blurts out that Pamela can be found at the Cleo Club. At the club, Pamela rejects her father’s pleas to return and runs out into the night.

Later, after Pamela and Nicky have their first real disagreement over their lifestyle and “go down flaming,” Nicky leaves in anger. Pamela calls LaGuardia who comes to her with a gift bottle of vodka. The two are conversing warmly, stretched out on Pam’s and Nicky’s bed, when Nicky returns, slightly drunk. Enraged at LaGuardia, Nicky begins to hurl objects at him and Pamela and they rush out. Nicky then burns all the mementos of the time with Pamela and, later, bursts into Johnny’s studio demanding that she be allowed to sing on the air. Into a dead microphone, Nicky sobs an incoherent babble of pain, accompanied by her guitar strumming. Then, out of control, Nicky is carried out of the studio, emotionally spent.

LaGuardia seeks out Pamela and brings her to a sleeping Nicky, now composed. Pamela tells Nicky that she will arrange for Nicky to fulfill a lifelong dream—a live rock concert to be held in Times Square. In her father’s office after hours, Pamela makes phone calls to every major radio outlet in the New York area, informing them of the impending rock concert in Times Square. Within days, every Sleaze Sister fan of Pam and Nicky has been told by radio of the big event.

All over New York City, teenage girls dress in their Sleez (sic) costumes and garish make-up and converge on Times Square. In their midst are David Pearl, who believes this is the night he will recover his daughter, and the concerned social worker, Rosie Washington, who also has faith in another recovery that night—of Nicky Marotta.

With the huge crowd teeming on the streets of Times Square, Nicky Marotta makes her entrance for the hundreds of fans—atop the marquee of the Times Square movie house. With her are Pamela, in the shadows behind Nicky, and Nicky’s back-up group, The Blondells. Nicky introduces her concert with some well-chosen words on revolt, rebellion and resistance to authority, then breaks into an inspired rendition of her “Damn Dog.” As cheers and applause fill Times Square, a number of policeman move in toward Nicky. She threatens to jump if they close in before her concert is concluded. A few more remarks, a song reprise… and Nicky leaps into the crowd below….

Johnny LaGuardia, who has been viewing the activity in Times Square through a high-powered telescope, and has reported to his listeners, reflects that he had once advised a lonely Pamela Pearl, then his anonymous letter writer, to conquer her fears and “fly.”

 

 

Times Square Synopsis (press kit, AAT ID: 300236195)
2 pp., 29.7 x 22 cm. (work);
Times Square UK Press Info sheet front_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 769 px (W), 96 dpi, 382 kb
Times Square UK Press Info sheet rear_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 757 px (W), 96 dpi, 436 kb

 

Times Square Synopsis, from the Times Square Press material folder (press kit, AAT ID: 300236195)
5 pp, 8.5 x 11 in. (work);
TIMES SQUARE Press Kit0002_synopsis_1_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 836 px (W), 96 dpi, 269 kb
TIMES SQUARE Press Kit0003_synopsis_2_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 836 px (W), 96 dpi, 272 kb
TIMES SQUARE Press Kit0004_synopsis_3_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 835 px (W), 96 dpi, 269 kb
TIMES SQUARE Press Kit0005_synopsis_4_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 837 px (W), 96 dpi, 276 kb
TIMES SQUARE Press Kit0006_synopsis_5_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 836 px (W), 96 dpi, 188 kb

 

TIMES SQUARE, p. 47
Screenplay by Jacob Brackman
1979

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

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“6”

Posted on 24th March 2017 in "Times Square"
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Robin Johnson as Nicky Marotta during the filming of TIMES SQUARE (1980). The number and the stamp on the back imply that it was part of the UK Press Kit. The caption for photo 6 in the Press Kit reads:   15-year-old screen newcomer ROBIN JOHNSON stars as Nicky Marotta, a street-wise young runaway who, thanks to a radio DJ's patronage, is able to fulfil her fantasies of becoming a star of the "new wave".

6/7/8. 15-year-old screen newcomer ROBIN JOHNSON stars as Nicky Marotta, a street-wise young runaway who, thanks to a radio DJ’s patronage, is able to fulfil her fantasies of becoming a star of the “new wave”.

 

 

This, I believe, is one of the photos missing from my copy of the UK Press Kit. The photo caption sheet in the press kit lists photos 6, 7, and 8 as pictures of Robin all with the same caption, and my copy only has a 7 and 8. This photo has a tiny “6” inset on the front, and the back has the same black “TIMES SQUARE” stamp as the Press Kit photos. Add in the fact that this came from a memorabilia dealer in England, and I’m satisfied that it was originally part of the Press Kit package.

 

It’s the same image as TS-69-34A/4 from the US Press Material folder, printed with higher contrast and thus losing some detail, but cropped differently so it shows a little more of the area around Robin. We can now see Trini’s arm, the bottom of the guitar, and not quite enough more of the headstock to be sure whether this was before or after the “Rickenbacker” nameplate was removed. The same image was also used by ITC to promote the film, that one being cropped even closer.

 

 

[Times Square UK Press Kit photo 6]
black and white photographic print, 25.3 x 20.2 cm. (work);
1080 px (H) x 865 px (W), 96 dpi, 334 kb (image)

1980
inscription: [front] 6
[back:] [stamped, black:] TIMES SQUARE
[handwritten:] Robin Johnson | 96 | 429

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

Times Square UK Press Kit (post 4 of 4)

Posted on 19th August 2016 in "Times Square"
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Here are the last photos from my copy of the UK Press Kit. They don’t have numbers that would match them up with the enclosed caption sheet, so I have doubts as to whether they were actually a part of it.

Trini Alvarado and Robin Johnson, in an unnumbered print from the "Times Square" UK press kit.  At first glance this looks like a collage but lightening the image gives the appearance that it is actually the two of them together.  Other photos of Robin in that outfit were taken by Mick Rock, so it's almost certain that this is a Mick Rock photo.  None of the captions on the caption sheet match up with the image.  The caption list omits numbers 9 and 10; however, there are three unidentified photos in this copy of the press kit.

 

This is the Mick Rock photo of Robin that appeared on the contents page of Film Review, Vol. 30 No. 10, October 1980. At first I thought that it was a collage of that and a photo of Trini, but I tried lightening up the background and it does indeed appear that they’re standing in the same room, on the same floor. Also, if you crop the photo to remove Trini, you lose a bit of Robin’s elbow, and that’s exactly how the Film Review version appears. What I’m getting at is, this is apparently a photograph of Trini Alvarado taken by Mick Rock.

 

 

Trini Alvarado and Robin Johnson atop the Times Square Theater marquee at the climax of the film, in an unnumbered print from the "Times Square" UK press kit. None of the captions on the caption sheet match up with the image. The caption list omits numbers 9 and 10; however, there are three unidentified photos in this copy of the press kit.

 

 

Trini and Robin atop the Times Square Theater marquee. This photo is labelled TS-22-32 in the style of the US publicity photos.

 

 

Trini Alvarado, Robin Johnson, and Tim Curry in a rare glamor shot, outside on or near Pier 56, in an unnumbered print from the "Times Square" UK press kit. The photo is identified by a code that matches the US publicity photos style, TS-88-29A. None of the captions on the caption sheet match up with the image. The caption list omits numbers 9 and 10; however, there are three unidentified photos in this copy of the press kit. Two of them (including this one) have US-style code numbers.

TS-88-29A, another of those rare publicity photos that doesn’t try to depict a scene from the film, although it obviously comes from the day they shot the scene where Johnny gets Pammy kicked out of the “hideout”. There was at least one other shot taken that day of these three smiling for the camera, which was printed in color in an Australian magazine in 1981, and later on the sleeve of the Japanese laserdisc in 1986.

UK "Times Square" publicity photo stamp (back of UK Press Kit Photo #7)

Back of UK Press Kit photo #7


The backs of these three photos are blank. The rest of the photos in the UK Press Kit are stamped “TIMES SQUARE” on the back.

An identical stamp is on the back of this photo I posted about previously, which just happens to have a tiny UK Press Kit-style “34” printed into it. It would seem there was a series of UK photos that numbered at least up to 34, and which were stamped on the back with the movie title. This doesn’t mean, however, that they were all used… there’s probably at least a 2 and a 6 floating around somewhere, to match up with the caption sheet, but there’s no reason to think there was ever a 9, 10, or anything between 11 and 34. I can hope, though… it’s been quiet lately but “new” items still turn up from time to time.

One problem with the stamp, though, is that it also appears on the back of the second copy of Photo #1, the one with the US-style number on it. It seems as though it, and the smaller pasted-in number are good indicators that a given print was made and used in the UK, but I don’t think we can conclude anything else from it.

To finish things off, here are the two versions of the shorter profile of Robin. Again, the version on “Times Square” letterhead appears to have been “translated” into British English, “there’s an ad” into “there was an advert” and so on. I doubt Robin has ever said “advert” in her life. (The text below is the “British” version.)

ROBIN JOHNSON (Nicky Marotta)

Before spending twelve weeks in front of the “Times Square” cameras, the closest Robin Johnson ever came to a film set was when “The Wanderers” shot a scene in her Brooklyn neighbourhood. In fact, 15 year-old Robin had had no previous acting experience when, as a result of a five-month nationwide search, she was discovered by a talent scout outside Brooklyn High School. “He told me there was an advert in the paper for a girl about l6, slenderish, blonde hair and street—tough,” Robin recalls. “So he gave me a number to call. I just did it for a kick. I didn’t expect nothin’ out of it.”

A native of Brooklyn, Robin is blessed with an incredible amount of energy, awareness and photogenic appeal – as well as a very distinctive voice. Her “street toughness” is no surprise, since she describes her own Brooklyn neighbourhood as “not rough rough – like you gotta carry a knife on you. You just got to watch out for yourself.”

1.65m (five-feet five inches) and 52kg (115 pounds), Robin has green eyes and naturally blonde hair which was dyed several shades of red for the role. Like her screen counterpart, she is a devout rock enthusiast whose favourites include Led Zeppelin, The Wh0 and The Rolling Stones.

Before filming ”TIMES SQUARE”, Robin’s ambition was to become a commercial artist, but now she is already a seasoned performer and will be featured singing on the soundtrack album released by RSO Records.

TIMES SQUARE is an EMI Films presentation distributed in the United Kingdom by Columbia-EMI-Warner, in North America by AFD (Associated Film Distribution) and throughout the rest of the world by EMI Films Limited.

 

 

TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_a
1080 px (H) x 864 px (W), 96 dpi, 154 kb (image)
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_b_TS-22-32
1080 px (W) x 864 px (H), 96 dpi, 302 kb (image)
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_c_TS-88-29A
1080 px (W) x 883 px (H), 96 dpi, 240 kb (image)
black and white photographic prints, 8 in (H) x 10 in (W) (works);

1980
inscriptions: [none]; TS-22-32; TS-88-29A
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_7 back
1080 px (H) x 864 px (W), 96 dpi, 44.9 kb (image)

 

ROBIN JOHNSON (Nicky Marotta) p. 1
8.5 in (W) x 11 in (H) (work);
1080 px (H) x 832 px (W), 96 dpi, 210 kb (image)

 

ROBIN JOHNSON (Nicky Marotta) p. 1-2
8.27 in (W) x 11.69 in (H) (works);
1080 px (H) x 755 px (W), 96 dpi, 279 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 755 px (W), 96 dpi, 59.2 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square UK Press Kit (post 3 of 4)

Posted on 9th August 2016 in "Times Square"
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First, some pictures.

Tim Curry as Johnny LaGuardia on the roof outside the WJAD studio, in the UK press kit photograph numbered 5.  This photo was taken a second before or after the photo numbered TS-79-28/8 in the US press kit.  The text from the press kit's photo captions page:  5. TIM CURRY stars as an all-night disc jockey, who, perched in his studio high above Times Square follows and encourages the progress of the runaway girls, who thanks to his efforts become minor media celebrities.

5. TIM CURRY stars as an all-night disc jockey, who, perched in his studio high above Times Square follows and encourages the progress of the runaway girls, who thanks to his efforts become minor media celebrities.

 

 

UK Press Kit photo #5 is another headshot of Tim Curry, this time as Johnny appears at the end of the film as he’s watching the concert though his telescope on the deck outside WJAD. The most interesting thing about this photo is, at first glance it looks like TS-79-28/8 from the US press kit, but it isn’t. It’s not just cropped differently; Tim’s head is tilted up slightly and he hasn’t got the beginnings of a smile he sports in the US photo. It’s a different photo, taken just before or just after.

Photos 6, 7, and 8 are pictures of Robin. Unfortunately I don’t have Photo 6, and none of the photos without the little number are of Robin alone.

Robin Johnson as Nicky Marotta atop the Times Square Theater marquee, in the UK press kit photograph numbered 7. The text from the press kit's photo captions page: 6/7/8. 15-year-old screen newcomer ROBIN JOHNSON stars as Nicky Marotta, a street-wise young runaway who, thanks to a radio DJ's patronage, is able to fulfil her fantasies of becoming a star of the "new wave".

6/7/8. 15-year-old screen newcomer ROBIN JOHNSON stars as Nicky Marotta, a street-wise young runaway who, thanks to a radio DJ’s patronage, is able to fulfil her fantasies of becoming a star of the “new wave”.


In Photo 7, Nicky kneels at the edge of the Times Square Theater marquee, deciding if she wants to perform or not. She never looks up in the film like she’s doing here, though, not without turning to look at Pammy or the Blondells. Perhaps she’s waiting here for a cue from Allan Moyle.
Robin Johnson as Nicky Marotta in the Cleo Club, in the UK press kit photograph numbered 8. The text from the press kit's photo captions page: 6/7/8. 15-year-old screen newcomer ROBIN JOHNSON stars as Nicky Marotta, a street-wise young runaway who, thanks to a radio DJ's patronage, is able to fulfil her fantasies of becoming a star of the "new wave".

6/7/8. 15-year-old screen newcomer ROBIN JOHNSON stars as Nicky Marotta, a street-wise young runaway who, thanks to a radio DJ’s patronage, is able to fulfil her fantasies of becoming a star of the “new wave”.

 

Photo 8 has Nicky scoping out the Cleo Club for Pammy, before revealing her attempt at poetry to her. This one is really close to the shot as it appears in the film, but it isn’t. The POV is slightly to the left of the movie camera, and although Robin is doing the same nervous finger-pulling, her hands are never in that exact position. This is the same almost-but-not-quite situation we saw with the shots of Trini from the later scene in the club where Mr. Pearl confronts Pammy.

I don’t have any photos numbered 9 or 10, and the caption sheet has no entries for them.

Trini Alvarado as Pamela Pearl, in the UK press kit photograph numbered 11. The text from the press kit's photo captions page: 11. TRINI ALVARADO, 12-year-old star of Robert Altman's RICH KIDS, is Pamela Pearl, daughter of a well-to-do New York family who runs away to find a new and exciting life in the city’s streets.

11. TRINI ALVARADO, 12-year-old star of Robert Altman’s RICH KIDS, is Pamela Pearl, daughter of a well-to-do New York family who runs away to find a new and exciting life in the city’s streets.

 

 

Photo 11 is a shot of Trini from the end of the same scene in the Cleo Club as Photo 8. In the film she never looks in thIS direction while smiling. Also, this photo has been lit in such a way as to make the background disappear entirely. The photographer took the opportunity to make this a true glamor portrait, not just an on-set publicity still. The glass on the table by her elbow shows that it was taken on the set, though.

Most of the photos in the UK Press Kit are very grainy and dusty compared to the US photos, as if they were printed from copies themselves. I’ve cleaned up the dust and scratches that were on the physical copy of the prints, but I’ve left most of the ones that were in the print itself, except the ones that were so huge I couldn’t stand to leave them.

There are two sets of text pages, and two profiles of Robin in each. The longer profile is almost the same as the one from the US press kit. Almost… but not quite. Aside from the slight rewording of nearly every sentence, this UK version spells Allan Moyle’s name correctly, where the US press kit and the film itself spell it “Alan”. The UK version describes Robin’s “discovery” on the steps of Brooklyn Tech in 1979 when she was 15 (which is accurate), and the US version has it happening in 1980 and gives her age as 16. I’m starting to wonder if the UK Press Kit wasn’t made up first, and the US version derived from it. (The photo captions also state Robin’s age as 15, which she was during the making of the film; she was 16 during its marketing.)

The only difference between the two sets in the UK Press Kit is that the text on the pages without the Times Square letterhead contain American spellings of words, and the pages with Times Square letterhead contain British spellings (“centers”/”centres”, etc.).

“TIMES SQUARE” STAR ROBIN JOHNSON IS A NATURAL

One day Brooklyn’s Technological High School’s front steps may be legendary as the spot where a star was “born”, a ’79 equivalent to Hollywood’s Schwab’s Drug Store, On those steps, smoking a cigarette while waiting for classes to begin, 15 —year—old ROBIN JOHNSON was discovered by a casting scout on the lookout for possible candidates for the lead in TIMES SQUARE.

“He gave me this card and said to call this number if I was interested in being in a movie,” Robin recalls in her inimitible Brooklyn-accented speech. “I thought ‘Oh! Another wise guy’, but gave it a try.”

What Robin didn’t know at the time was that director Allan Moyle, who had written the original story for TIMES SQUARE with Leanne Unger, was determined to cast only the young actress who would be precisely right for the crucial central role of Nicky Marotta, a gusty teenager, loose and without adult super- vision and determined to be a rock star.

The talent search had already bypassed many of the traditional avenues and gone to youth centres, punk clubs, and placed ads in papers like the Village Voice, Soho News, Aquarian. “We were looking for someone who WAS Nicky,” Moyle admits. “Robin’s definitely not that doomed child. Luckily for the picture, Robin’s brought a lot more humour to the character than I had originally envisioned.”

Without any previous experience – “I had sung in a choir when I was 12” – Robin won the role over literally thousands of other candidates. After being cast, she entered an intensive programme of coaching in singing and dance/movement. Making the film meant that the novice was quickly transformed into a seasoned professional. Robin worked seven days a week for three months, for as a minor, the new star had to continue her studies with a tutor on the set and more lessons on Saturday. On Sunday, recording or dancing demands would take up the day. The veteran members of the New York crew were impressed with the professionalism of both Robin and her even younger co-star, 13-year-old TRINI ALVARADO. Both exhibited an almost non-stop flow of dedication, energy, high spirits and raucous good humour.

Robin lives with her older sister Cindy and her mother, in- Brooklyn. Born on May 29th, 1964, Robin never gave any thought to becoming an actress until TIMES SQUARE.

Her inclination previously ran toward sketching (I’m not into landscapes; give me cartoons with some people in there “) and, whenever the opportunity arose, banging on drums. And although she first started dating when she was 11, she’s not worried about permanent relationships at this point in her life. “I’m closest with my sister Cindy, who’s a year older. We’re both Geminis and I like to argue, especially in a friendly way.”

Like many young women her age, Robin can identify with Nicky’s rebelliousness and non-conformity, traits which land Nicky in trouble with the law and into the arms of Rosie (ANNA MARIE HORSFORD), a concerned social worker. “Nicky can’t put things over on Rosie like she does with others,” Robin figures, “and that’s the reason she admires her. I have trouble with authority figures, too, which means anybody with the upper hand – like my mother or my teachers.” But for director Allan Moyle, who might be considered the supreme authority figure, Robin has only praise: “We’re alike in certain ways and that made it easier to relate. Allan’s absolutely brilliant for inspiration, for giving you energy for a scene. When he wants you to do a scene better, he gets you to think, not bullying or intimidating, I want to work with him again.”

Robin sees Nicky as a teenager who masks what she really feels and tried to make her real, “She was bitter about being abandoned. Her Dad’s a loser. All she can do is pity him, not be mad at him now. Nicky has a lot of gutsiness that I really admired. Her philosophy always was, ‘When you’re mad, show it’.”

Gutsiness is a trait Robin and Nicky have in common. Robin, besides being bright, witty and talented, is seemingly fearless, whether performing atop a 42nd Street theatre marquee or being dunked into the icy December water of the polluted Hudson River. “Nerves don’t get you anywhere,” she says.

Robin was coached for TIMES SQUARE by veteran Sue Seaton, who has worked with Katharine Hepburn and Gilda Radner, But that throaty timbre is unmistakably her own, perhaps a result of the ”Kool” cigarettes she smokes incessantly.

The closest Robin had ever been to a movie set before TIMES SQUARE was when a scene for “The Wanderers” was shot in her neighbourhood. Now, the world of movies is opening for her.

“Let me tell you about this movie business,” she says seriously. “There’s no right for anyone to get an attitude just because so many people are aware of your job. What I say is, it’s entertainment and it’s a job. I hope TIMES SQUARE does well, but it’s not the answer to my life. Most, I loved meeting and working with so many wonderful people.”

There is one confession she’ll make when prodded about the rigors of working in the realm of make-believe: “Oh yeah,” she says with a grimace, “chewing roses was pretty disgusting. I’d never tasted flowers before.”

Two things of interest, both in the credits as listed in the letterhead: first, the order of the cast. The film’s credits are “Starring TIM CURRY, TRINI ALVARADO, and introducing ROBIN JOHNSON as Nicky.” This letterhead’s credits read “Starring ROBIN JOHNSON, TRINI ALVARADO and TIM CURRY.” So, for a brief moment, Robin had top billing.

Second, I just noticed… all the promotional materials, as well as the film itself, misspell Leanne Ungar’s name “Unger”. Of course, in Moyle’s earlier film The Rubber Gun (1977), she had a music engineering credit that spelled her name “Lianne Ungen,” so I suppose this was a step up.

 

 

TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_5
1080 px (W) x 864 px (H), 96 dpi, 263 kb (image)
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_7
1080 px (W) x 864 px (H), 96 dpi, 260 kb (image)
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_8
1080 px (W) x 865 px (H), 96 dpi, 282 kb (image)
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_11
1080 px (W) x 865 px (H), 96 dpi, 245 kb (image)
black and white photographic prints, 8 in (H) x 10 in (W) (works);

1980
inscriptions: [on photos] 5; 7; 8; 11;
[on reverse] TIMES SQUARE

 

“TIMES SQUARE” STAR ROBIN JOHNSON IS A NATURAL, pp. 1-4
8.5 in (W) x 11 in (H) (works);
1080 px (H) x 832 px (W), 96 dpi, 238 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 832 px (W), 96 dpi, 200 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 832 px (W), 96 dpi, 233 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 832 px (W), 96 dpi, 115 kb (image)

 

“TIMES SQUARE” STAR ROBIN JOHNSON IS A NATURAL, pp. 1-3
8.27 in (W) x 11.69 in (H) (works);
1080 px (H) x 755 px (W), 96 dpi, 283 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 755 px (W), 96 dpi, 262 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 755 px (W), 96 dpi, 254 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square UK Press Kit (post 2 of 4)

Posted on 30th July 2016 in "Times Square"
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The UK press kit contains a photo caption sheet indicating that there should be 11 photos, and indeed there are, but they don’t match up with the captions. This is the main reason I don’t think my copy of the press kit is complete. On the other hand, it means there are a few photos in it that are complete bonuses, since I’ve never come across them elsewhere.

So, here’s Photo #1.

Nicky and Pammy about to enter the subway after escaping from the cop who chased them through the Adonis Theater. Version one of the first photo (best guess) from the UK TIMES SQUARE press kit. The text from the caption sheet: 1. ROBIN JOHNSON (left) and TRINI ALVARADO (right) as Nicky and Pamela, the teenage runaways who team up to roam the seamier streets of New York City.

1. ROBIN JOHNSON (left) and TRINI ALVARADO (right) as Nicky and Pamela, the teenage runaways who team up to roam the seamier streets of New York City.

We can tell it’s #1 because there’s a tiny “1” taped into the print, there at the lower right. But we immediately run into trouble, because although there’s no photo numbered “2”, Nicky and Pammy about to enter the subway after escaping from the cop who chased them through the Adonis Theater. Version two of the first photo from the UK TIMES SQUARE press kit. This version is cropped differently and has slightly lower contrast, and replaces the identification number "1" in the lower right corner with the US-style number TS-22-11 in the lower left.one of the remaining ten photos is this one:

Exactly the same picture! Except, it isn’t. It’s cropped differently: there’s less at the top and left and more on the right. It’s printed a little better, with less harsh contrast. And most importantly, there’s no little “1” taped into it. Instead, at the lower left it has the code number TS-22-11, in the style of the American press kit photos.

 

The caption for Photo 2 is: “2. TRINI ALVARADO and ROBIN JOHNSON join music’s ‘new wave’ as The Sleaze Sisters.” There are two photos that match up with that description, but neither of them have a “2” on them. One has no number at all, and one has US-publicity-style code printed on it. I’ll get to them later; for now, let’s skip to Photos 3 and 4.

 

A shot not appearing in the film, that would have belonged to the sequence where the girls look for Nicky's father. The caption from the UK Press Kit's photo descriptions page: 3. ROBIN JOHNSON (l) and TRINI ALVARADO (r), the two teenage runaways, become familiar figures in New York’s street society.

3. ROBIN JOHNSON (l) and TRINI ALVARADO (r), the two teenage runaways, become familiar figures in New York’s street society.

 

 

 

Photo 3 is another shot from the deleted scene of Nicky and Pammy searching for Nicky’s dad in Times Square. Considering the entire sequence was deleted and replaced by the short scene of the girls on the subway, there sure were a lot of photos taken. I wonder how much of it was actually filmed. Was there any footage taken of Nicky’s dad, and if so, who played him? And did the guy in this photo have a part in the film?

 

 

 

 

Tim Curry as Johnny LaGuardia in the WJAD studio, in the UK press kit photograph numbered 4. The text from the press kit's photo captions page: 4. TIM CURRY stars as an all-night disc jockey, who, perched in his studio high above Times Square follows and encourages the progress of the runaway girls, who thanks to his efforts become minor media celebrities.

4. TIM CURRY stars as an all-night disc jockey, who, perched in his studio high above Times Square follows and encourages the progress of the runaway girls, who thanks to his efforts become minor media celebrities.

 

 

 

 

 

While it doesn’t appear in the US press kit, we’ve seen Photo 4 before. It appeared in The Aquarian way back in April 1980, and then again in the September-October 1980 Mediascene Prevue, both times paired with a shot of the girls singing “Your Daughter Is One” that hasn’t yet turned up anywhere else. Both of those published versions have been cropped from this one.

 

 

Text:  TIMES SQUARE, a Robert Stigwood production, stars ROBIN JOHNSON, TRINI ALVARADO and TIM CURRY. Directed by Allan Moyle from a screenplay by Jacob Brackman, based on an original story by Moyle and Leanne Unger about two runaway girls and their adventures on the streets of New York0 Produced by Robert Stigwood and Jacob Brackman, with Kevin McCormick and John Nicolella as executive producers and Bill Oakes as associate producer.  TIMES SQUARE has been acquired by EMI for world-wide distribution.  1. ROBIN JOHNSON (left) and TRINI ALVARADO (right) as Nicky and Pamela, the teenage runaways who team up to roam the seamier streets of New York City.  2. TRINI ALVARADO and ROBIN JOHNSON join music's “new wave“ as The Sleaze Sisters.  3. ROBIN JOHNSON (l) and TRINI ALVARADO (r), the two teenage runaways, become familiar figures in New York’s street society.  4. TIM CURRY stars as an all-night disc jockey, who, perched in his studio high above Times Square follows and encourages the progress of the runaway girls, who thanks to his efforts become minor media celebrities.  5. TIM CURRY stars as an all-night disc jockey, who, perched in his studio high above TIMES SQUARE follows and encourages the progress of the runaway girls, who thanks to his efforts become minor media celebrities.  6/7/8.	15-year-old screen newcomer ROBIN JOHNSON stars as Nicky Marotta, a street-wise young runaway who, thanks to a radio DJ's patronage, is able to fulfil her fantasies of becoming a star of the "new wave".  11. TRINI ALVARADO, 12-year-old star of Robert Altman's RICH KIDS, is Pamela Pearl, daughter of a well-to-do New York family who runs away to find a new and exciting life in the city’s streets.

Here’s the full caption sheet. I have no photos numbered 2, 6, 9, or 10. There are no captions for photos numbered 9 or 10. I suppose it’s possible that there never were photos 9 and 10, and as this copy of the press kit went from person to person someone along the line stuck in 3 more photos to bring the total to 11 as the sheet implies. We may never know.

 

I do, however, have a photo numbered “34”. Which raises the question, are there photos numbered 12 to 33 somewhere out there?

 

 

 

TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo 1
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo 1a TS-22-11
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo 3
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo 4
black-and-white prints (photographs), AAT ID: 300128349; 8 in (H) x 10 in (W); 1980 (works);
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_1_1080px.jpg
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_1a_TS-22-11_1080px.jpg
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_3_1080px.jpg
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_4_1080px.jpg
1080 px (W), 96 dpi (images);
 
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit Caption Sheet, 8.27 in (W) × 11.7 in (H) (work);
1980 TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit text page – 0042_1080px.jpg, 764 px (W) x 1080 px (H), 96 dpi, 2.227 KB (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square UK Press Kit (post 1 of 4)

Posted on 20th July 2016 in "Times Square"
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The UK press kit had its own logo, a black-and-white Nicky atop a color theater marquee made of the words "Times Square".  Text:  EMI FILMS presents A ROBERT STIGWOOD Producton TIMES SQUARE EMI

TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit folder, front

 

TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit outer folder, inside

TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit folder, inside

 

The UK Press Kit is an even nicer package than its US counterpart, with its own logo featuring Nicky atop the theater marquee. Inside the big white folder is a smaller silver folder that holds the materials. (The reflective silver didn’t scan very well, I did what I could.) It almost certainly was produced during the summer or autumn of 1980, before the US opening of the movie.

 

 

The materials inside, unfortunately… I am not entirely confident that what I have is a complete press kit. There are two sets of mostly-but-not-quite-identical text pages, one on A4 size paper with a more elaborate letterhead than the US pages, and one on 8½ x 11 inch paper with no logos at all. And the A4 pages include a list of the photographs in the kit, but that list doesn’t quite match up with the photos I have. I have four copies of the US press kit so I have a pretty good idea of what was supposed to be in it; this is only UK press kit I’ve ever seen, and I have a few doubts.

Nevertheless, it still has some neat stuff in it. We’ll start having a look at it next time.

 

 

EMI FILMS presents A ROBERT STIGWOOD Production TIMES SQUARE
outer folder: 22.2 cm (W) x 31.7 cm (H)
inner folder: 22.2 cm (W) x 28.8 cm (H) (work);
inner folder contains: 11 information packets on A4 paper on “Times Square” letterhead, totalling 21 21 cm (W) x 29.7 cm (H) pages: ROBIN JOHNSON (Nicky Marotta) (2 pp.), TRINI ALVARADO (Pamela Pearl) (2 pp.), TIM CURRY (Johnny La Guardia) (2 pp.), ROBERT STIGWOOD (Producer) (4 pp.), ALLAN MOYLE (Director) (2 pp.), JACOB BRACKMAN (Producer and Screenwriter) (1 p.), BILL OAKES (Associate Producer) (1 p.), KEVIN McCORMICK (Exectutive Producer) (1 p.), JOHN NICOLLELLA (Executive Producer) (1 p.), “TIMES SQUARE” STAR ROBIN JOHNSON IS A NATURAL (3 pp.), TRINI ALVARADO – A SHOWBUSINESS “PRO” AT 13 (2 pp.); 12 information packets on 8 1/2 x 11 paper without letterhead, totalling 21 21.6 cm (W) x 27.9 cm (H) pages: TIMES SQUARE: Production Notes (4 pp.), ROBIN JOHNSON (Nicky Marotta) (1 p.), TRINI ALVARADO (Pamela Pearl) (1 p.), TIM CURRY (Johnny LaGuardia) (1 p.), ROBERT STIGWOOD (Producer) (3 pp.), ALLAN MOYLE (Director) (1 p.), JACOB BRACKMAN (Producer and Screenwriter) (1 p.), BILL OAKES (Associate Producer) (1 p.), KEVIN McCORMICK (Exectutive Producer) (1 p.), JOHN NICOLLELLA (Executive Producer) (1 p.), “TIMES SQUARE” STAR ROBIN JOHNSON IS A NATURAL (4 pp.), TRINI ALVARADO – A SHOWBUSINESS “PRO” AT 13 (2 pp.); 1 sheet of photo captions on A4 paper without letterhead; 11 black and white photographs, 23 cm x 25.5 cm

1980
1980 TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit folder cover – 0043_1080px.jpg, 1980 TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit folder inside_stitch_1080px.jpg, 1980 TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit folder flap – 0045_1080px.jpg, 1980 TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit folder back – 0044_1080px.jpg, 1980 TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit inner folder outside_1080px.jpg, 1980 TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit inner folder inside_1080px.jpg (images)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

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Times Square Press Material folder (post 5 of 5)

Posted on 1st June 2015 in "Times Square"
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Publicity still of Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado from the "Times Square" US Press Materials folder. Text: TIMES SQUARE AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution

TS-82-30
Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado are New York teenagers whose runaway antics and revolt against authority make them the talk of The Big Apple through the radio reports of an all-night disc jockey in “Times Square.”

 

 

The last photos from the press kit. To the left, Pammy and Nicky on the roof from which they toss their first television set, although here Nicky appears to be translating a radio broadcast for Pammy. Nothing like this occurs in the film; this photo, however, will be turned into a line drawing and used to advertise the movie’s opening in Germany. Its full code number is nearly impossible to see, as it’s written in white against the white background in the lower right corner. The first three segments (TS-82-30) are on the caption sheet. I think the last segment is “/4.”

 

 

 

 

Publicity still of Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado atop the Times Square Theater marquee, from the "Times Square" US Press Materials folder. Text: TS-28-28/7 TIMES SQUARE AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution

TS-28-28
Robin Johnson, as self-styled “Sleaze Sister,” takes a final rebellious stand against authority atop a Times Square theater marquee, as Trini Alvarado, her fellow runaway and Sleaze Sister, watches in the nerve-tingling climactic scene of “Times Square.”

 

 

 

 

 

To the right is the photo from which the last image on my post of stuff I found on the Web was edited, as Sarah from Vintage Salt informed me shortly after that post went up. I even had a version of that same picture as my Facebook cover image at the time, and somehow I just never made the connection. It’s another of the many photos taken of the concert.

 

 

 

Publicity still of Tim Curry from the "Times Square" US Press Materials folder. Text: (on image) TS-79-28/8 (on border) TIMES SQUARE AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution

TS-79-28
Tim Curry, British actor-singer best known for his rock star role in “The Rocky Horror Picture Show,” is starred as Johnny LaGuardia, all-night disc jockey in New York, whose encouragement on the air to two runaway teenage girls turns them into minor media celebrities in “Times Square.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heeeeere’s Johnny! A glamour shot of Tim Curry as Johnny LaGuardia, in costume for his reporting on the final concert, standing on the balcony of the Candler Building overlooking the Times Square Theater. His telescope is visible there at the right.

 

 

 

Black & white publicity still of Robin Johnson in costume as Nicky Marotta from the last scene of the film, from the "Times Square" US Press Materials folder. Text: TS-104-17A/2 AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution TIMES SQUARE

TS-42-11A
Robin Johnson effects a garish costume and make-up as she and her fellow teenage runaway flaunt authority as the “Sleaze Sisters” on their wild dash through the back streets of New York City in “Times Square.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

And finally, Robin. This must have been taken at the same time as this slide, but this is the shot they went with. I’d love to see it in color.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To wrap things up, here is the press kit’s biography of Robin. It’s four pages. Trini gets two pages. Robert Stigwood gets three. Tim Curry only rates one page. Someone certainly realized which side their promotion was buttered on.

It features a second, longer telling of her “discovery,” as well as her view of the production as a job, and not one she was necessarily even considering continuing.

“TIMES SQUARE” STAR ROBIN JOHNSON IS A NATURAL IN SCREEN BOW

At some time in the future Brooklyn’s Technological High School steps may become legendary as the spot where a star was “born,” the 1980 equivalent to Hollywood’s Schwab’s Drugstore. On those steps and waiting for classes to begin, 16-year-old Robin Johnson was discovered by an (unknown) casting scout on the lookout for possible candidates for the leading role in “Times Square,” an October release from AFD (Associated Film Distribution).

“He gave me this card and said to call this number if I was interested in being in a movie,” Robin recalls in her inimitable Brooklyn-accented speech. “I thought: Wow! Another wise guy. But I gave it a shot.”

What Robin didn’t know at the time was that the film’s director, Alan Moyle, who had written the original story for “Times Square” with Leanne Unger, was determined to cast only the young actress who would be precisely right for the crucial central role of Nicky Marotta, a spunky teenager loose and without adult supervision, determined to become a rock star. The talent search already had bypassed many of the traditional avenues and scoured youth centers, punk rock clubs, and placed ads in papers such as the Village Voice, Soho News, and Aquarian.

“We were looking for someone who WAS Nicky,” Moyle admits. “Robin is definitely not that doomed child. Luckily for the film, Robin brought a lot more humor to the character than what I had originally envisioned. Her youthful innocence and energy buoy up what might have been played as too much of a downer.”

Without any previous experience (“I had sung in a choir when I was 12”), Robin won the role over literally hundreds of other candidates. Upon winning the role, she entered an intensive program of singing lessons and a dance and movement regimen. Making this film meant that the novice had to be transformed quickly into a seasoned professional. Robin worked seven days straight for 12 weeks. As a minor, the new “star” had to continue her studies with a tutor on the set and more learning sessions on Saturdays. On Sundays, recording or dancing demands took up the day. Veteran members of the New York film crew were dazzled by the professionalism of both Robin and her even younger co-star, 13-year-old Trini Alvarado. Both exhibited an almost non-stop flow of dedication, energy, high spirits and raucous good humor.

Robin Johnson lives with her older sister Cindy and their mother in the Park Slope area of Brooklyn, New York. Born May 29, 1964, Robin never gave any thought to becoming an actress until “Times Square.” Her inclination previously ran to sketching (“I’m not into landscapes; give me cartoons with some people in there.”) and, whenever the opportunity arose, banging on drums. And although she first started “dating” when she was 11, she’s not worried about permanent relationships at this point in her life. “I’m closest with my sister Cindy, who’s a year older. We’re both Geminis and I like to argue, especially in a friendly way.”

As do many young women her age, Robin can identify with Nicky’s rebelliousness and non-confirmity, traits which land Nicky in trouble with the law and into the arms of a concerned social worker. “Nicky can’t put things over on her like she does with others,” Robin figures, “and that’s the reason she admires her. I have trouble with authority figures, too, which means anybody with the upper hand—my principal, my mother, my teachers.”

Of director Alan Moyle, who might be considered the supreme authority figure, Robin has only praise. “We’re alike in certain ways and that made it easier to relate. Alan’s absolutely brilliant for inspiration, for giving you energy for a scene. When he believes you can do a scene better, he gets you to think, but not with bullying or intimidation I really want to work with him again.”

Robin perceives Nicky as a teenager, masking what she really feels and tried to “make her real.” “She was bitter about being abandoned. Her dad’s a loser. All she can do is pity him, not be mad at him now. Nicky has a lot of gutsiness that I really admired. Her philosophy always was: ‘When you’re mad, show it.'”

Gutsiness is a trait Robin and Nicky have in common. Robin, as well as being bright, witty and talented, is seemingly fearless, whether performing atop a 42nd Street theater marquee or being dunked into the icy December brine of the polluted Hudson River. “Nerves don’t get you anywhere,” she says, simply enough.

Robin was coached for “Times Square” by veteran Sue Seaton, who has worked with the spectrum from Katharine Hepburn to Gilda Radner. But that throaty timbre is unmistakably Robin’s own, perhaps a result of her ever-present Kool cigarettes (“Kools are cool”).

The closest Robin had ever been to a movie set before “Times Square” was when “The Wanderers” shot a scene down the block in her neighborhood. Now, the world of movies is opening for her. “Let me tell you about this movie business,” she says seriously. “There’s no right for anyone to get an attitude just because so many people are aware of your job. What I say is, it’s entertainment and it’s a job. I hope ‘Times Square’ does well, but it’s not the answer to my life. Most, I loved meeting and working with so many wonderful people.”

There is one confession she’ll make when prodded about the rigors of working in the realm of make-believe: “Oh yeah,” she says with a grimace, “chewing the roses was pretty disgusting. I’d never tasted flowers before.”

“Times Square,” starring Robin with Tim Curry and Trini Alvarado, is a Robert Stigwood Presentation, directed by Alan Moyle from Jacob Brackman’s screenplay. The new film was co-produced by Stigwood and Brackman, with Kevin McCormick and John Nicolella as Executive Producers and Bill Oakes the Associate Producer.

 

 

TS-82-30[/4]
1080 px (H) x 857 px (W), 96 dpi, 330 kb (image)
TS-28-28/7
1080 px (H) x 865 px (W), 96 dpi, 305 kb (image)
TS-79-28/8
1080 px (W) x 855 px (H), 96 dpi, 226 kb (image)
TS-42-11A/2
1080 px (H) x 855 px (W), 96 dpi, 276 kb (image)
black and white photographic prints, 8 in (H) x 10 in (W) (works);

1980
inscriptions: [on photos] TS-82-30[/4?]; TS-28-28/7; TS-79-28/8; TS-42-11A/2;
(on borders) TIMES SQUARE
AFD
©1980 Associated
Film Distribution

 

“TIMES SQUARE” STAR ROBIN JOHNSON IS A NATURAL IN SCREEN BOW, pp. 1-4
8.5 in (W) x 11 in (H) (works);
1080 px (H) x 840 px (W), 96 dpi, 293 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 836 px (W), 96 dpi, 300 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 835 px (W), 96 dpi, 293 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 835 px (W), 96 dpi, 78.9 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square Press Material folder (post 4 of 5)

Posted on 23rd May 2015 in "Times Square"
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Robin Johnson as Nicky Marotta, holding her Rickenbacker guitar in the WJAD studio.  Publicity still from the "Times Square" US Press Materials folder.  Text:  (on image) TS-69-34A/4  (on border)TIMES SQUARE AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution

TS-69-34A
Robin Johnson is a runaway teenage product of the streets who dreams of becoming a rock music star and lets nothing get in her way to make it to the top in “Times Square.”

Publicity still of Trini Alvarado and Robin Johnsonperforming "Your Daughter Is One" in the WJAD studio, from the "Times Square" US Press Materials folder.   Text:  TS-72-8A/14 TIMES SQUARE AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution

TS-72-8A
Robin Johnson (right) is determined to become a rock music star, Trini Alvarado is her fellow teenage runaway and their wild, bizarre escapades in New York make them minor media celebrities when reported by an all-night radio disc jockey in “Times Square.”

 

On the left is the same photo as this one, cropped differently and of course without the autograph.

On the right is the photo that may be the one used the most to promote the film. We’ll have a better idea about that once I’m done with all this stuff. Until just now, I always thought it was a cropped version of this photo (that version of which I’ve only seen on the Web and believe to have been cut from a UK lobby card), but now I realize they were taken a second or two apart. Look at their arms.

Publicity still of Trini Alvarado in the Cleo Club, from the "Times Square" US Press Materials folder. Text: (on image) TS-113-4A/6 (on border) TIMES SQUARE AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution

TS-113-4A
Trini Alvarado is co-starred as the troubled teenage daughter of a New York politician whose lack of attention turns the girl into a teenage runaway and a try at becoming a dancing attraction in a sleazy nitery in “Times Square.”

Publicity still of Peter Coffield and Tim Curry in the WJAD studio from the "Times Square" US Press Materials folder. Text: (on image) TS-78-2/16 (on border) TIMES SQUARE AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution

TS-78-2
Peter Coffield (left), ambitious New York politician and widower, confronts disc jockey Tim Curry when the all-night performer encourages Coffield’s runaway daughter to continue her rebellion against authority in “Times Square.”

 

 

As always, there is no shot in the film that matches up either of these two photos. Mr. Pearl does throw Johnny into the table as at left, but the shot cuts from a close-up of Pearl grabbing Johnny and pushing him to a close-up of Johnny landing; there is no shot of the two of them. Also, Johnny’s hand never touches the mic stand as it does in the photograph. There is nothing even close enough to bother with a frame grab.

We see Pammy looking in the mirror fairly clearly in the film, but just like these photos, in the film we see it from her father’s perspective, and she’s not quite in the same pose as in the photo. Here’s the closest frame from the film:

Pammy Pearl experiments with her look in the Cleo Club - frame grab from "Times Square" (1980)

 

 

TS-69-34A/4
1080 px (H) x 862 px (W), 96 dpi, 297 kb (image)
TS-72-8A/14
1080 px (H) x 856 px (W), 96 dpi, 311 kb (image)
TS-78-2/16
1080 px (W) x 856 px (H), 96 dpi, 289 kb (image)
TS-113-4A/6
1080 px (H) x 862 px (W), 96 dpi, 257 kb (image)
black and white photographic prints, 8 in (H) x 10 in (W) (works);

1980
inscriptions: [on photos] TS-69-34A/4; TS-72-8A/14; TS-78-2/16; TS-113-4A/6;
(on borders) TIMES SQUARE
AFD
©1980 Associated
Film Distribution

 

vlcsnap-2015-04-12-11h40m58s217.png
853 px (W) x 480 px (H), 72 dpi, 872 kb (image)
frame capture from Times Square (1980)
captured 2015-04-12

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square Press Material folder (post 2 of 5)

Posted on 5th May 2015 in "Times Square"
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Times Square… introduces Robin Johnson, dynamic 16-year-old Brooklyn actress and singer in her film debut.”



Okay, forget what I said last time about posting the pictures in the order they occur in the film. There are too many without Robin in them to do it in a way that I find aesthetically pleasing without posting them all at once, and I don’t feel like doing that. Besides, the photo I posted last time was #4 in that order, so I’m already not doing it.

So, here are three photos from the AFD Times Square Press Material folder.

Publicity still of  Trini Alvarado from the "Times Square" US Press Materials folder.  Text:  (on image) TS-11-24/5  (on border) TIMES SQUARE AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution

TS-11-24
Trini Alvarado, who made an impressive screen debut in Robert Altman’s “Rich Kids,” now is co-starred with Robin Johnson and portrays Pamela Pearl, troubled daughter of an ambitious politician, who becomes a runaway and a rebel against authority in “Times Square.”

 

 

 


 

 
This is the photo of Trini that was used, with the photo of Robin from last time, to make the collage that was the American movie poster and the soundtrack album cover. Even now, I find it a bit disconcerting to realize that that wasn’t really a picture of the two of them together, but was assembled from these two separate photos. Of course nearly all movie posters are put together that way, but, still…

 

Publicity still of Tim Curry in the WJAD control room, from the "Times Square" US Press Materials folder.  Text:  (on image) TS-66-28/9  (on border) TIMES SQUARE AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution

TS-66-28
Tim Curry, British actor-singer best known for his rock star role in “The Rocky Horror Picture Show,” is starred as Johnny LaGuardia, all-night disc jockey in New York whose encouragement on the air to two runaway teenage girls turns them into minor media celebrities in “Times Square.”



 

 

This photo of Tim Curry was probably taken at the same time as the photo published in The Aquarian and Prevue. It’s similar to the image of Tim later used in the poster design, but not identical: he’s looking right at us there, as we’ll see, um, soon enough. In my opinion, though, that picture isn’t as good a likeness as the poster versions of Robin and Trini, so it’s possible the artist used this as the basis for an illustration that changed the pose, rather than repainting the photo directly. I haven’t yet found a photo that matches up to Button Johnny.

 

 

 

 

Publicity still of Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado in Pier 56, from the "Times Square" US Press Materials folder.   Text: TS-109-16/12 TIMES SQUARE AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution

TS-109-16
Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado portray New York runaway teenagers who revolt against authority and are encouraged to continue their escapades and “fly” by an all-night radio disc jockey in “Times Square.”

 

 

 

And this shot from the “‘NICKY!!’ ‘PAMMY!!!'” scene, which I assume you’ll trust me by now, doesn’t match up to any frame in the film. It’s not shot from quite that angle, and while she’s speaking Robin bends down to Trini’s eye level. As usual, the photo was taken at the time of the filming, but isn’t a photo of what ended up in the film.

All the photo caption sheets also have the title TIMES SQUARE after the ID number, and end with the lines “Publicity Department, AFD, 12711 Ventura Blvd., Studio City, CA. 91604 / AFD / ©1980 Associated / Film Distribution”. Leaving that in makes the captions here even more unwieldy than they already are. So, it’s here, if you need it.

 
Most of the captions also contain the phrase “revolt” or “rebel against authority,” but I’m leaving those in.

 

Also, here is the “General Information” sheet that leads off the photo pack.

Sheet accompanying photographs in the US Press Materials folder. Text: TIMES SQUARE PHOTO CAPTIONS GENERAL INFORMATION "Times Square," a contemporary drama with music, stars the bright new talents of Tim Curry, British performer best known for "The Rocky Horror Picture Show," Trini Alvarado, who scored a remarkable screen bow in Robert Altman's "Rich Kids," and introduces Robin Johnson, dynamic 16-year-old Brooklyn actress and singer in her film debut. "Times Square," filmed at diverse New York locations, including Times Square's infamous "Deuce," is highlighted by 20 original songs, exemplifying some of the best contemporary rock music and performed by leading recording artists, as well as the feminine co-stars Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado. "Times Square" depicts the misadventures of two rebellious teenage girls, one from an affluent environment, the other a product of the streets. Together, they flee from their room in a neurological hospital, commandeer an ambulance and begin a series of wild and bizarre escapades, with their behavior reported by an all-night disc jockey who urges them on as their antics turn them into minor media celebrities. Their flight from authority of any kind is climaxed in a nerve-tingling dramatic conclusion atop the marquee of a Times Square theater, as hundreds of their teenage followers below cheer in tribute. "Times Square," a Robert Stigwood Presentation, was produced by Stigwood and Jacob Brackman and was directed by Alan Moyle from Brackman's screenplay, based on a story by Moyle and Leanne Unger. Kevin McCormick and John Nicollela are the executive producers, and Bill Oakes is associate producer. The EMI Films motion picture is released in the U.S. and Canada by AFD (Associated Film Distribution).

For what it’s worth, it reads:

TIMES SQUARE

PHOTO CAPTIONS

GENERAL INFORMATION

“Times Square,” a contemporary drama with music, stars the bright new talents of Tim Curry, British performer best known for “The Rocky Horror Picture Show,” Trini Alvarado, who scored a remarkable screen bow in Robert Altman’s “Rich Kids,” and introduces Robin Johnson, dynamic 16-year-old Brooklyn actress and singer in her film debut.

“Times Square,” filmed at diverse New York locations, including Times Square’s infamous “Deuce,” is highlighted by 20 original songs, exemplifying some of the best contemporary rock music and performed by leading recording artists, as well as the feminine co-stars Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado.

“Times Square” depicts the misadventures of two rebellious teenage girls, one from an affluent environment, the other a product of the streets. Together, they flee from their room in a neurological hospital, commandeer an ambulance and begin a series of wild and bizarre escapades, with their behavior reported by an all-night disc jockey who urges them on as their antics turn them into minor media celebrities. Their flight from authority of any kind is climaxed in a nerve-tingling dramatic conclusion atop the marquee of a Times Square theater, as hundreds of their teenage followers below cheer in tribute.

“Times Square,” a Robert Stigwood Presentation, was produced by Stigwood and Jacob Brackman and was directed by Alan Moyle from Brackman’s screenplay, based on a story by Moyle and Leanne Unger. Kevin McCormick and John Nicollela are the executive producers, and Bill Oakes is associate producer. The EMI Films motion picture is released in the U.S. and Canada by AFD (Associated Film Distribution).

More to come. If you’re really ansty, DefeatedandGifted has already long since posted all of these pictures, including a set that was apparently released in 1981 that I don’t have, so you might as well just go over there anyway. Go on. You were just visiting anyway! GET OUTTA HERE!!! –Sorry about that. See you in week or so.

 

 

TS-11-24/5
1080 px (H) x 857 px (W), 96 dpi, 270 kb (image)
TS-66-28/8
1080 px (H) x 860 px (W), 96 dpi, 254 kb (image)
TS-109-16/12
1080 px (W) x 857 px (H), 96 dpi, 197 kb (image)
black and white photographic prints, 8 in (H) x 10 in (W) (works);

1980
inscriptions: [on photos] TS-11-24/5; TS-66-28/8; TS-109-16/12;
(on borders) TIMES SQUARE
AFD
©1980 Associated
Film Distribution

 

TIMES SQUARE PHOTO CAPTIONS GENERAL INFORMATION
8 in (W) x 10 in (H) (work);
1080 px (H) x 836 px (W), 96 dpi, 258 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square Press Material folder (post 1 of 5)

Posted on 26th April 2015 in "Times Square"
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The US Press Kit for "Times Square" (1980); outside front cover of the folder  Text:  TIMES  SQUARE PRESS MATERIAL
Generally referred to as The Press Kit, this is the big-ass promotional package AFD released in North America. Since they didn’t have a table of contents, I can’t be sure what all was in it, not without examining all of them… which is impossible because I’m afraid most of them have been taken apart, the text pages tossed, and the photos sold off individually, because, hey, more money that way. But I have seen four of them, and although two are missing items the others have, the most complete ones contain:

  • 1 8″ x 10″ sheet of “PHOTO CAPTIONS GENERAL INFORMATION”
  • 16 8″ x 10″ black and white photos with accompanying caption sheets affixed to their back and folded over their fronts
  • 8 information packets, totaling 37 8.5″ x 11″ pages:
    • SYNOPSIS (5 pp.)
    • ROBERT STIGWOOD Presents “TIMES SQUARE” (8 pp.)
    • PRODUCTION INFORMATION (8 pp.)
    • ROBERT STIGWOOD BIOGRAPHY (3 pp.)
    • BRITISHER TIM CURRY ACTING RARITY–SKILLED IN MODERN AND CLASSIC (1 p.)
    • “TIMES SQUARE” STAR ROBIN JOHNSON IS A NATURAL IN SCREEN BOW (4 pp.)
    • TRINI ALVARADO–SHOW BUSINESS ‘PRO’ AT 13 (2 pp.)
    • FILM DIRECTOR MOYLE KEEPS HIS COOL ON FIRST MAJOR FILM (3 pp.)
    • MUSIC FROM ‘TIMES SQUARE’ NOW TWO-RECORD SOUNDTRACK ON RSO RECORDS (3 pp.)

I also don’t know for sure what order the items originally went in. Except for today, I’m going to post the images in the order the scenes they represent appear in the film, and not with their caption sheets, although I will include the text from them in their captions (as you can see below). I don’t have unlimited server space, so two copies of each picture is kind of out of the question at the moment. I’m also only going to post the texts that mention Robin, unless, say, I get several dozen requests clamoring for the biography of Robert Stigwood.

So, to start with, here’s the U.S. Press Kit version of the picture we saw here, with and without the caption sheet.

This version is more tightly cropped than the previous one, but it’s lower contrast, so we can read her “I Am Anonymous – Help Me” button. The other version has a tiny number “36” on it, which is cropped out of this version and replaced by the longer number consistent with the rest of the AFD publicity stills.

By this time they’ve settled on the trademarked logo for the film title. The caption sheets all omit the last digit of the number printed onto the photographs: this photo is TS-57-26/1, but the caption sheet identifies it as TS-57-26. As I said before, I also don’t know what the numbers signify. “TS” is obviously “Times Square,” but the rest… scene-shot/take, maybe? This particular photo is just a publicity glamor shot, as well. So, I’m waiting for someone who knows more about it to tell me.

The bottom of the caption sheets, which are on the backs of the photos the way they’re folded, are all identical:

"Times Square," a contemporary drama with music starring Tim Curry,  Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado,  is a Robert Stigwood Presentation,  produced by Stigwood and Jacob Brackman and directed by Alan Moyle from  Brackman's screenplay, based on a story by Moyle and Leanne Unger, with  Kevin McCormick and John Nicollela the executive producers and Bill Oakes  the associate producer. The EMI Films motion picture will be released on Friday,  October 17  in the U.S.  and Canada by AFD   (Associated Film Distribution). * Publicity Department, AFD,  12711 Ventura Blvd., Studio City, CA.  91604 AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution

And, just for kicks, here are the pages from the credits packet that have Robin’s name on them.

Funny, I never noticed before, even in 1980 David Johansen’s publishing company was called Buster Poindexter, Inc.

 

 

TIMES SQUARE PRESS MATERIAL
folder: 9 in (W) x 12 in (H) (work);
1080 px (H) x 888 px (W), 96 dpi, 386 kb (image);
left pocket contains: 1 8 in (W) x 10 in (H) sheet: “PHOTO CAPTIONS GENERAL INFORMATION”, 16 8 in x 10 in black and white photos with accompanying caption sheets affixed to their back and folded over their fronts;
right pocket contains 8 information packets, totalling 37 8.5 in (W) x 11 in (H) pages: SYNOPSIS (5 pp.), ROBERT STIGWOOD Presents “TIMES SQUARE” (8 pp.), PRODUCTION INFORMATION (8 pp.), ROBERT STIGWOOD BIOGRAPHY (3 pp.), BRITISHER TIM CURRY ACTING RARITY–SKILLED IN MODERN AND CLASSIC (1 p.), “TIMES SQUARE” STAR ROBIN JOHNSON IS A NATURAL IN SCREEN BOW (4 pp.), TRINI ALVARADO–SHOW BUSINESS ‘PRO’ AT 13 (2 pp.), FILM DIRECTOR MOYLE KEEPS HIS COOL ON FIRST MAJOR FILM (3 pp.), MUSIC FROM ‘TIMES SQUARE’ NOW TWO-RECORD SOUNDTRACK ON RSO RECORDS (3 pp.);

1980

 

TS-57-26 [with caption sheet]
black and white photographic print, 8 in (W) x 10 in (H) (work)
1080 px (H) x 857 px (W);
96 dpi, 279 kb (image)

1980
inscription: [on caption sheet:] TS-57-26
“TIMES SQUARE”
Robin Johnson, 16-year-old Brooklyn miss, makes her feature film singing and acting debut as Nicky Marotta, an uninhibited product of the streets who sets New York City on edge as a wild runaway from authority in “Times Square.”
Publicity Department, AFD, 12711 Ventura Blvd., Studio City, CA. 91604
AFD
©1980 Associated Film Distribution

 

TS-57-26/1
black and white photographic print, 8 in (H) x 10 in (W) (work);
1080 px (H) x 861 px (W), 96 dpi, 306 kb (image)

1980
inscription: [on photo] TS-57-26/1
[on border] TIMES SQUARE
AFD
©1980 Associated Film Distribution

 

[Back of US press kit caption sheets]
[full caption sheet, not pictured:] 7 in (W) x 6 in (H) (work);
858 px (W) x 364 px (H), 96 dpi, 104 kb (image)

 

ROBERT STIGWOOD Presents “TIMES SQUARE”, pp. 1, 2, 7
8.5 in (W) x 11 in (H) (works);
1080 px (H) x 835 px (W), 96 dpi, 128 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 835 px (W), 96 dpi, 196 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 836 px (W), 96 dpi, 244 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+