Filmstar, Vol 1 No. 3, Thailand, August 1981

Posted on 9th November 2018 in "Times Square"
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Cover of movie magazine from Thailand with article about TIMES SQUARE (1980)

 

 

 

By August 1981, Robin might already have figured out that neither she nor Andy Gibb were going to get a call telling them when to report to the Grease 2 set. Most of the world had already forgotten about Times Square. But it wasn’t quite over yet.

 

Thailand’s Filmstar magazine devoted four pages and the back cover to the upcoming release of Times Square. I tried and failed to get a professional translation of the article. Google Translate makes nearly as bad a hash of Thai as it does Japanese, but from what I can make out, this is a purely promotional article summarizing the plot, like the articles in Sonido No. 56 and Film Review Vol. 31 No. 2.

 

The caption and drawing on page 63, the first page of the article, are from the European movie poster, and the photo of Pammy and Nicky is TS-72-8A/14, the most-used photo of the girls together.

The image from the poster also appears on page 64, above UK Press Kit photo #4 of Tim Curry. The large photo of Robin, as far as I know, made its first appearance here. As she’s looking directly into the camera, I suspect it was taken at the same time as this pre-take shot, but since the background is cut out there’s just as good a chance it was taken at Pier 56.

The large image of Trini on page 65 looks to be from the same origin as that photo of Robin. Based on what I can make out of the lighting, I tend to think it’s from the outside location. It’s the only photo I’ve seen of Trini in that costume where she isn’t holding the boom box. The inset of the cops pushing Nicky into the back seat is another previously, and as far as I know, otherwise unpublished publicity still. The only matching shots in the film are from the opposite side of the car, and the film camera’s setup from this reverse angle is several feet to the left.

The shot of Robin as Nicky as Aggie Doone singing “Damn Dog” in the Cleo Club is yet another photo making its first appearance. But not its last… there’s a slightly better version yet to come.

So, amazingly, the Times Square publicity campaign was nearing its end, yet the places it was being published were being furnished with new material, despite it being highly unlikely that the local audiences would have seen any of the already-used photos. Unless, perhaps, the EMI/AFD publicity departments had decided that what they’d been doing was failing, and if they could only find the right photos, they could turn Times Square into a hit in the next country…

The back cover of Filmstar was a reproduction of the collage first published in Screen International No. 246 in June 1980 and used in February 1981 as the Australian movie poster, with the addition of Robin’s name in English. If there’s one thing all the local contemporary film publicity outlets agreed on, it’s that Robin herself was the most marketable aspect of the movie.
 

TIMES SQUARE Robin Johnson poster on the back cover of a movie magazine from Thailand

Posts mentioned above but not linked to:

Times Square Press Material folder (post 4 of 5)
Times Square UK Press Kit (post 2 of 4)
On Location
Times Square Program Book, Japan, June 1981, pages 20-24 (post 4 of 5)
Times Square Australian Daybill

 

 

Times Square (article, AAT ID: 300048715)
Filmstar Vol. 1 No. 3, 15 August 1981, pp. 63-66 (magazine (periodical), AAT ID: 300215389)
25.9 x 18.9 cm. (work);
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Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

More stills from the UK series

Posted on 28th October 2018 in "Times Square"
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TIMES SQUARE (1980) publicity still, black and white 8"x10", #41 from the UK series  Text:  [on front:] 41  [on back:] [stamp:]  TIMES SQUARE  [in Hebrew and English] STILLER FILM LTD. L.A. [illegible] PHONES [illegible] TEL-AVIV  [handwritten]  [Times Square) [in Hebrew]  41  (41?) [in Hebrew?]

 

I nearly passed over this lot of five black and white stills, except it had one photo I’d never seen. Rather than try to haggle for just the one photo, I bought the lot, and I’m glad I did, because they’re all from the UK series, three of them were new numbers, and the others are slightly different again from the previous copies I have.

 

This shot is number 41, and the highest number I’ve yet found. (I have 18 of them.) It’s the one I thought I’d never seen, but I was wrong: it was published on the back of the “Times Square Trailer” UK soundtrack sampler record sleeve.

 

The other four are numbers 20, 23, 34, and 40.

 

 

All five have borders, where most of the series are printed full-bleed, all the way to the edges. Number 20 is the third copy and the third variant I’ve found. The first had the number printed to the right, against the grey background. The second was cropped more generously at the bottom, and had the number against the black of Nicky’s coat, but cut off at the bottom.. This one is cropped like that second version, and has the number in almost the same place, but up a few millimeters so it can be seen clearly. It also looks like it’s the exact same number stuck on the print – the handwriting looks identical in all three. I suppose this is obvious to anyone who works in movie promotion, but I am not one of those people — it would seem that whenever they needed more copies of an image, they dug out the negative, stuck on the number, and ran off a few prints, and every run ended up slightly different from every other.

 

Number 23 is TS-82-30/4, but cropped more generously at the top and bottom and more narrowly on the left and right. Number 34 is a second copy of the first photo I ever found from this series, but it’s printed much lighter, washing out Pammy’s face, and the number has moved from just to the left of the neon “Q” in “TIMES SQUARE” to inside the curve at the right. And number 40 is TS-42-11A/2, printed lighter with higher contrast, and cropped more generously at the left and bottom. Although it seems obvious now, seeing this is the first time I’ve realized that this shot, along with this one and this one, were taken as Robin was kneeling on top of the theater marquee, and the blurred lights behind her are the street below.

TIMES SQUARE (1980) publicity still, black and white 8"x10", from the UK series  Text:  [on front:] 23  [on back:] [stamp:]  TIMES SQUARE  [in Hebrew and English] STILLER FILM LTD. L.A. [illegible] PHONES [illegible] TEL-AVIV  [handwritten]  [Times Square) [in Hebrew]  (photo number?)

 

These prints were distributed in Israel by Stiller Film Ltd., whose partially visible stamp on their backs indicates that they had a local office in Tel Aviv. The prints also have the TIMES SQUARE stamp found on the backs of many, but not all, of the UK series, and what I believe is Times Square in handwritten Hebrew.

 

Pages referred to but not linked directly above:

Times Square Press Material folder (post 5 of 5)
Blast from the Past
Times Square Blue
Times Square UK Press Kit (post 4 of 4)
UK Promo Photo #29

 

 

20
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347
UK ; 8″ x 10″ (work)
UK still 20_1080px.jpg
863 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 362 kb (image)

23
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347
UK ; 8″ x 10″ (work)
UK still 23_1080px.jpg
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UK still 23 back b_1080px.jpg
860 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 169 kb (image)

34
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347
UK ; 8″ x 10″ (work)
UK still 34_1080px.jpg
865 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 374 kb (image)

40
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347
UK ; 10″ x 8″ (work)
UK still 40_1080px.jpg
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41
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347
UK ; 8″ x 10″ (work)
UK still 41_1080px.jpg
868 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 331 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

JUKE, No. 302, February 7, 1981

Posted on 16th October 2018 in "Times Square"
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Cover of an Australian music newspaper weekly containing several stories relating to TIMES SQUARE (1980)  Text:  JUKE  FEBRUARY 7, 1981  Issue No. 302  70 CENTS  "Registered for posting as Publication Category B"  TIMES SQUARE TO  CITY SQUARE  PLUS ROXY MUSIC SPECIALS  WILLIE NELSON  XTC TAYLOR/MANNING  SURFING  RUTS WILLIE NILE  IN CONCERT  Australian Crawl, Flowers, Midnight Oil, Jo Jo Zep & The Falcons, Mondo Rock

The soundtrack album cover image on the cover of Australia’s Juke no. 302 is the only Robin content in the issue, but it’s still a remarkable piece of Times Square history. In Melbourne at least, PolyGram Records promoted the heck out of the film’s premiere for an entire weekend, and the magazine gave away posters and copies of the soundtrack. If there’s anybody reading this who remembers any of this happening, I’d be very interested in hearing about it.

 
Photo of Tim Curry in an Australian music newspaper weekly containing several stories relating to TIMES SQUARE (1980).  Caption:  In the “Times Square” movie, Tim Curry plays an all night disc jockey who gives his listeners a  running account of the two runaway girls’ progress.

BIG PUSH ON ‘TIMES SQUARE’
By Brian Jones

To promote the opening of the Times Square movie in Melbourne this week, PolyGram Records have come up with a unique idea.

To take Time Square to the city square. Over the weekend they hired out the huge video screen at the Melbourne city square where excerpts of the movie were flashed with lots of plugs for the double soundtrack LP and other PolyGram product. If you caught the screening, you’d have noticed that JUKE Magazine got its whack of plugging as well.

To celebrate the release of the movie, not to mention Roxy Music coming into Melbourne (certainly a big plus in their promotion as Roxy are featured on the soundtrack as well!) JUKE is this week giving away 12 copies of the soundtrack LP. Write to “Times Square” competition, care of this magazine, and tell us three of the artists on the LP, with your name and address on the back of the envelope.

And for Melbourne readers, the first 20 to waltz up to the Juke offices during business hours and ask for it gets a special colour poster.

The movie, which premiers on Feb 5, is about two runaways who end up at Times Square in New York, and is produced by Robert Stigwood.

In the “Times Square” movie, Tim Curry plays an all night disc jockey who gives his listeners a running account of the two runaway girls’ progress.

Pages 6, 7, and 13 contained articles on three of the bands with songs on the soundtrack, one of whom (Roxy Music) was playing in Melbourne that week — although the interview with Phil Manzanera had been conducted a week previous, while the band was still in England. The articles are all branded with a big Times Square logo (unique to this magazine), but make absolutely no references to the movie. I’m reproducing the text below because they’re a bit of a window into the world the movie was being released into, but they have nothing to do with Times Square, and even less to do with Robin Johnson.

And note that one of the articles in the magazine was written by “Betty Page,” and another by “Brian Jones.” I don’t know what to make of that.

TIMES SQUARE
XTC in NEW YORK
Betty Page finds them slaving for the Yankee dollar

Once big in trousers, now big in the States? Five minutes into New York and the taxi driver (always good for copy, dese guys) wants to know in his best Brooklynese “are dey like da Beatles?”

Funny he should say that! Here’s the city mourning not only a death but the fact that any Beatles reunion of any sort is over, and you have XTC who have similar characters — Terry Chambers like Ringo (whacky/moody), Colin Moulding is a Paul (pretty bassist), Andy Patridge is a John with pebble specs and aggressive humour and Dave Gregory is George, the strong silent type with a schoolboy’s face.

Four individuals, churning out pop song after commercial pop song, yet experiencing the ultimate frustration of being denied enormous popular acclaim, after so much hard grafting.

Due to some particular warped business logic, XTC have been touring constantly for 20 weeks (although Andy reckons they haven’t stopped since 1977!) the last half of which has been spent in the USA. This tour’s had its peaks and troughs but, with the backing of the big guns at RSO, Black Sea has launched into the Top 100 and a prestigious support for the Cars at Madison Square Gardens.

I arrived to find the boys a bit ruffled (they’d just seen the sleeve of their next single ‘‘Sgt. Rock” botched by the art department into a variation of Corporal Clot) and homesick for home in Swindon. They’d just been to New Orleans and recounted the constant sun, desert and cacti of Arizona, “we’d only seen them drawn in the Beano (a British comic book — ed) and I made up some cactus jokes especially. What’s the difference between a Scotsman and a cactus? At least you can get a drink out of a cactus!”

The show on Long Island was lacklustre. Their superb soundman Steve Warren had quit after an argument with their manager, and it showed. So too did tour exhaustion. There was so much cussing that even the groupies held back! Groupies haven’t been a XTC forte but, for a band that virtually celebrates its ase-xuality, they now attract a particular brand of predatory females.

Andy: “It’s getting worse. Some of them are real elephant dogs! Others just want to show you their portfolios. I’d rather take to my bed with my plastic tanks”.

XTC are clearly very tired. Despite that, they had to fly back to Britain in a few days to start another tour, and they angrily knocked back offers to do a visit to Scandinavia.

“It’s just piled up since ’77” Andy explained. “I refuse to do anything for at least a couple of months. I want to work on some singles, concentrate on that before the next album.”

The next day was concentrated on doing interviews — and the American press still seem preoccupied with Barry Andrews, who left two years ago, and refer to Dave Gregory as “the newcomer”.

Dave takes it all in good humour. He talks about his dreams and nightmare. His nightmare is to come out on stage on day, plug in and “sound like Ted Nugent”. The dream is to own as many perfectly formed guitars as possible — maybe form his own guitar harem with all of them wearing veils! He tells of the time when they did a tour with Police, and manager Copeland ticked off XTC for not giving everything onstage. The talk made them think; now they gyrate onstage.

Andy was lambasted for “not wearing a decent shirt”. Couldn’t he afford one?

“To be frank, no!”

Not even Sting’s cast-offs?

“No! (recoils in horror) I’m living in that man’s shadow. Been in a bloody coach with him for eight weeks. He nicked all my ideas in the first place. All three of the Police used to come down the Fulham Greyhound (pub) and watch us. He said his favourite song was ‘All Along The Watchtower’ so you can see where they’re coming from!”

The Police spectre looms large. When Police travel the world and play exotic places like Bombay and Cairo, they’re huge. When XTC play the same places then they’re just working hard. Could XTC have such a superhero? Men in backrooms have toyed with the idea of making a sex symbol out of Colin Mulding, trundling him forward more often and pinching some limelight from Andy.

But isn’t Colin too passive, isn’t it too late for a change of image into some sort of double-fronted Cheap Trick style combo?

According to Andy, it’s already started to happen. “I think he’s got a lot more teen appeal than I’ll ever have. I always thought I looked like a tortoise who’d just had his shell ripped off! He comes forward already; he sings the singles, it’s him on Top Of The Pops, not me. I think people associate Colin with singing the singles. A lot of people think he’s our lead singer, those that know our singles. There’s a split identity.”

XTC are having a series of hit singles including “General And Majors”, “Living Through Another Cuba” and “Towers Of London” continually increasing their hit records. In England they have a passionate following but really no image except for Patridge’s cynical persona. In America, they can be easily manipulated; in fact, because all five have such strong personalities, a TV series of films could catapault them into the big time. As yet, America hasn’t decided if they’re clever, banal or intriguing; so they just love them!

First night at Madison Square Gardens. Patridge is nervous and limits his onstage patter. But they go down well. “The next band on is the Cars — don’t be too hard on them”. After a record company guy comes over and ticks them off, in case the Cars feel insulted. Wha-a-t! Come on, oh well, tough shit.

So the struggle goes on. They’re confident that they’ll break through, it takes a bit of time. But at the moment they’re all very tired and very homesick.

Andy: “I just want to re-evaluate our whole position. It may turn out that we may never tour again, hahaha, what a scoop! We’ve been whoring our arses up and down the world too much, it’s obviously, not the way to do it.

“We want to try and be a little bit more exclusive. We were rather lukewarmly received at home last time. We’ll be even more knackered this time. We do need to recharge our batteries, new ideas, new approaches, this really is the end-of-a-long-piece-of-knotted-string tour, the frayed end …”

I’VE GOT ROXY IN MY HEAD
TIMES SQUARE
Roxy Music’s Phil Manzanera Speaks to Vince Lovegrove

“If it weren’t for the Beatles I wouldn’t be playing music”, Phil Manzanera told me by phone one week before Roxy Music arrived in Australia.

“They were a great influence on all of us. You know, when you’re a certain age you really get excited by certain groups. But it’s a bummer about Lennon. A great tragedy. We’ve started doing a tribute to him. Sometimes we do “Jealous Guy”.

Manzanera had just rushed back to his hotel after a sellout concert in Manchester, England. The reason for the rush from the concert hall wasn’t to take my pre-arranged phone call, but to order some food before the hotel kitchen closed.

“It’s the typical rock scenario. Most hotel kitchens close early and then you can only order sandwiches. We have to get back from the gig in a hurry so that we can have a decent meal.

“New York’s different, of course. It’s a twenty four hour city. It’s a bit dangerous, but exciting and stimulating-for a short time”.

Phil Manzanera is an articulate, quietly spoken man … on a Manchester to Sydney telephone call, at least. Although I’m not a diehard Roxyite, I quite like the band, and found myself locked into Manzanera. In fact, as Bert Newton once said to Mohommad Ali, “I like the boy!”

I found his casual thoughts on rock’n’roll and life in general very honest and realistic. Not at all like rock’n’rollers whose conversations begins and ends with the ‘virtues’ of rock music.

In fact, from his early 1970 experimental days in Quiet Sun to his 1976 ‘one off’ album band 801, Manzanera has always seemed to me to be the one who has taken Roxy Music into the provocative areas of rock music. Obviously, Brian Eno added his eccentricity, but he has never really stayed within the confines of Roxy Music like Manzanera.

And it was Manzanera’s honesty that first told us about dissatisfaction within the group after their fourth album, Country Life.

And while it was Ferry who announced in 1976, that Roxy Music were about to enjoy a trial separation, it was Phil Manzanera who immediately rushed headlong into producing 801, ensuring that the genius of Brian Eno would finally be recognised outside the confines of Roxy Music.

“Actually, that was an incredible period. It made me realise just how much the business side of rock’n’roll can ruin the very essence of the music itself.

“It was the business side of it that stopped Roxy moving for three years.

“You get caught on this incredible momentum, that just doesn’t stop. You have to deliver an album, then go on tour to promote it, and by the time you’ve finished you’ve go to deliver another album. Consequently, you don’t get time to write any material.

“You get locked into a cocoon, getting transported around in an unreal world and just don’t get time to develop as a human being.

“We just had to stop the merry-go-round, get off and become human beings again”.

It was during that re-kindling period that Johnny Rotten spearheaded the movement that saved rock’n’roll from a pathetic, self indulgent, financially bloated, slow agonising death. And one of its staunchest supporters was Phil Manzanera.

“I think Johnny Rotten is a very interesting character. He has a great sense of humour. I admire him greatly.

“The entire punk movement was fantastic. It gave rock music a much needed kick in the arse. It provided heaps of enthusiasm, inspired amateurs and showed that anyone could start a group”.

In total contrast, it was the pure jazz/classical influences of English contemporary band Sky that smashed the snob inspired anti rock music feeling that once existed amongst highly trained, technical musicians.

“Rock isn’t about technical prowess, it’s about feel, “Manzanera enthused.

“Sky are great musos, and they smashed that anti rock snobbery”.

Did he know two members of Sky, Kevin Peak and John Williams were Australian?

“No, I didn’t”.

Roxy Music, during their ‘rest periods’ are quite a sporting bunch of fellas, and super whizz kid guitarist Phil Manzanera is no exception. He plays a lot of golf, tennis, and water skis when he can. That is, when he’s not spending time with his two dogs, two cats, several horses, or simply lounging around home with his pregnant wife listening to music.

And what sort of music would Phil Manzanera listen to?

“Well, I love UB40’s. They have great feel, fantastic lyrics, and memorable melodies. Then there’s Steely Dan — I love their new album. Bowie I like, Dire Straits, a band called Black Uhuru, and of course Talking Heads.

“But I think their latest album is more of an Eno album that a Heads set. They seem to have lost some of themselves, and given way to more of Brian”.

Well, I don’t know who’s going to pay for this bloody phone call. Maybe I should finish off.

After all, the group will be in Australia by the time I get off my backside and get it into Juke. And you can bet your last pair of safety pins that Roxy’s record company won’t pay for it. And I just KNOW the promoter won’t pay for it. I better finish. I’ll probably end up footing the bill again.

One last question, Phil. Is there anything special in Roxy Music’s staging this time around?

“As a matter of fact, there is. We have a very interesting stage set… not like anything else around at the moment. It’s electric in a mechanial sort of way. I won’t give it away, let me say that I still like looking at it after six months”.

LONDON CALLING
with Jillian Hughes
TIMES SQUARE
NO RUTS ABOUT IT

Very few bands are willing to carry on when their focal point leaves. When that person dies suddenly in an accident — or a heroin overdose as in the case of Malcolm Owen the lead singer of the Ruts — then it takes awhile to get over the shock.

But the Ruts, one of the original punk bands, came up trumps. Renaming themselves Ruts DC (DC stands for Da Capo which is Latin for “a new beginning”) they went back to their original audiences, tore them apart, and are now off to America to try their luck there. Meantime there’s also a new LP of old material called Grin and Bear It.

“Last summer was probably the worst time for us” says bassist Vince Segs, who has stepped in as their main vocalist. ‘‘We’ve always known that Malcolm was doing heroin. He also had problems with his throat, which just went on him. It was very frustrating for us, because we couldn’t work a lot of the time, and it was very frustrating for Malcolm, which is probably why he went back on the hard stuff again.

“The pressure was on us — everyone was aware that the kids out there wanted to hear us, but we were being held up. We started to drift apart.”

Right after Owen died, the Ruts came up with one of their best singles yet, ‘‘West One (Shine On Me)”. But partly because it was such a change from their rock-reggae, and partly because they made no appearances to promote it, the disc died. Then the Damned stepped in and took the three — the other two are drummer Dave Ruffy and guitarist Paul Fox — on tour with them, just to give them a helping hand. The Ruts re-discovered their audience, and found enough confidence to write new songs.

Grin and Bear It is seen by some as a shoddy cashing in on Malcolm’s death by their record company Virgin, well known for Sid Vicious/-Pistols re-issues.

“It is an album we put together for Malcolm’s memory, that’s all. We wanted it out, not the record company. We didn’t have enough studio material with Malcolm to make up an LP so we put in some live things. Some people say it’s a con because Ruts fans would have all the tracks.

“That’s not so. Fans wouldn’t have the live version of ‘Babylon’s Burning’ or the John Peel (radio) session recording of ‘Demolition Dancing’ — the LP’s not intended to tear about the charts, it’s just there for anyone who wants it. The album we aim for the charts is the one we start work on soon. If anything, we wanted to bring ‘Love in Vein’ back — it was hidden on the b-side of ‘Staring at the Rude Boys’ the first time.”

Ruts DC are touring and recording with a sessions sax/keyboards player called Garry Barnacle who was on their first LP The Crack as well as Grin and Bear It.

 

 

Juke No. 302, February 7, 1981 (weekly (publication) (AAT ID: 300312030))
44 x 28 cm.;
Brian Jones, Big push on ‘Times Square’; p. 5
Betty Page, XTC in New York; p. 6
Vince Lovegrove, I’ve got Roxy in my head; p. 7
Jillian Hughes, No Ruts about it; p. 13 (works);
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(images)
 
©1981 Newspress Pty. Ltd.

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Suplemento de Espectaculos El Heraldo de Mexico, No. 820, August 9, 1981

Posted on 29th August 2018 in "Times Square"
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“If there’s one thing I defend fiercely, it’s my private life.”

Entertainment Supplement to The Herald of Mexico, August 9, 1981, featuring cover story on Robin Johnson, with two photos.  Text:  México, D. F., Domingo 9 de Agosto de 1981    suplemento de ESPECTACULOS EL HERALDO DE MEXICO  NUEVAS ESTRELLAS: ROBIN JOHNSON Por Mauricio Peña       "Si hay algo que defiendo ferozmente, es mi vida privada", nos dice de entrada Robín Johnson al recibirnos en la suite de un hotel capitalino. Y sigue: "No lo digo porque me sienta incómoda al ver que la gente empieza a invadir mi mundo; no, después de todo sólo he filmado una película y nadie tiene obligación de reconocerme en la calle. Pero estoy convencida que si sigo en esto por más tiempo, empezarán las responsabilidades de otro tipo, como esconderse en público, soportar la intromisión de extraños cuando de piden autógrafos. Yo admiro profundamente a Bette Midler pe ro nunca me atrevería a pedirle un autógrafo; no la molestaría con una tontería de esa clase."       Robín Johnson es una muchacha de 17 años, la única película que ha protagonizado se llama "Guerreras de Nueva York"  (Times Square).       Es de las nuevas actrices de cine, que crecieron con otro concepto de lo que es una actriz de cine; Robín es el ejemplo de la antiestrella: una ¡oven espontánea, que habla y dice lo que piensa. "Si llego a film otra película o más, nunca iré a vivir a Hollywood; prefiero que se haga en Nueva York, donde vivo, donde está mi familia, mis amigos, mi  propio ambiente".       Algo puede suceder con la carrera cinematográfica de Robín Johnson. Tiene un contrato para hacer otras películas y  grabar discos con la organización de Robert Stigwood. "De aquí a febrero estoy a la expectativa de hacer una película o  dos, y grabar un al bum, pero todavía no se eligen las canciones. Existe el proyecto de Robert Stigwood, para hacer la secuela de 'Vaselina", y allí me quieren poner. Me encanta la idea de seguir haciendo películas musicales, o donde la música tenga".         Es una jovencita independiente y decidida; tiene una voz ron ca, pero al mismo tiempo muy dulce y femenina. Es muy sana y conoce muy bien los peligros a los cuales están orilladas muchas actrices jóvenes, cuando les llega su trozo de celebridad y triunfo. "No quiero segúir el esquema de todas las actrices que se involucran demasiado en su carrera, que enloquecen con ella, que al teran su vida familiar y caen a veces en garras de la droga o se suicidan con alcohol".         En la película de su debut, Robin Johnson trabajó con Trini Alvarado, y dice de ella: "es una gran amiga". Acerca del actor inglés Tim Curry, que hace el papel de un disc jockey de estación de radio en "Guerreras de Nueva York", Robin nos dice: "No llegamos a ser grandes amigos, pero es admirable verlo trabajar; es una gente muy rigurosa, se encierra a meditar cada escena, es de los actores con método a los que puedes aprenderles muchas cosas. Es envidiable su trabajo. Yo no tengo ningún método, soy lo que podría considerarse: una actriz natural".                                                 (Las fotos de este reportaje son de Raul "Speedy" Gonzalez). [Mexico, D.F., Sunday, August 9, 1981    The Herald of Mexico - Entertainment Supplement  NEW STARS: ROBIN JOHNSON By Mauricio Peña       "If there's one thing I defend fiercely, it's my private life," Robin Johnson tells us as   she enters the suite of a hotel in the capital. And she continues: "I'm not just saying that   because I feel uncomfortable seeing people start invading my world; no, after all I've just   filmed a movie and nobody is obligated to recognize me on the street. But I'm convinced that if   I do this long enough, I'll have to start laying low in public, to endure   the intrusion of strangers asking for autographs. I deeply admire Bette Midler, but I would   never dare to ask her for an autograph; I wouldn't bother her with nonsense like that."       Robin Johnson is a 17-year-old girl; the only film that she has starred in is called   "Warriors of New York" (Times Square).       She is one of the new film actresses, who grew up with a different concept of what a film   actress is; Robin is an example of the anti-star: a spontaneous woman who speaks and says what   she thinks. "If I get to film another movie or more, I will never go live in Hollywood; I'd   prefer it to be done in New York, where I live, where my family is, my friends, my own   environment."       Something may come of Robin Johnson's film career. She has a contract to doother movies and   make records with Robert Stigwood's organization. "From now until February I'm expecting to make   a movie or two, and record an album, but the songs are not yet chosen. There's Robert Stigwood's   project to do the sequel to 'Grease,' and they want to put me in it. I love the idea of   continuing to make musical films, or where music plays a big part, like in the first one. "               Many will wonder then, why did she choose an artistic career in which she is not 100   percent sure of meeting her responsibilities?          "I'm 17 years old, I'm just going to finish my studies and my family wants me to go to   college. There are also many things I can study. I like the film world, but I have never   taken classes in a rigorous and formal way; I have very good memories of my first film, but I   think that tomorrow something different will also grab my attention."         Robin says that her family -- father, mother and older sister -- weren't critical of her   trying her luck in the movies. "They're not pushing me to continue in this medium, leave home or   my studies, as far as a career as an actress, they let me make my decisions alone. I had no   experience when I tried out for the leading role of 'Warriors Of New York.' I auditioned after a   few setbacks. I had a lot of worries but no experience."         She is an independent and determined young woman; her voice is hoarse, but at the same   time very sweet and feminine. She is very healthy and knows very well the dangers to which many   young actresses are exposed when they attain celebrity and triumph. "I don't want to follow in   the footsteps of all the actresses who are invested too much in their career, who go crazy with   it; they lose their family and sometimes get hooked on drugs or kill themselves with alcohol."         In her debut film, Robin Johnson worked with Trini Alvarado, and says of her, "She's a   great friend." About the English actor Tim Curry, who plays the role of a radio station disc   jockey in "Warriors of New York", Robin tells us, "We're not going to be close friends, but I   admire watching him working; he's very rigorous, he meditates alone on ever<y scene, he's a   method actor who you can learn a lot from. His work is enviable. I have no method, I am what you   could call a natural actress."                                                 (Photos by Raul "Speedy" Gonzalez) ]

The Sunday entertainment supplement to El Heraldo de Mexico put Robin on its cover on August 9, 1981. I don’t know for sure if Robin’s publicity tour took her to Mexico City, but the two photos by Raul “Speedy” Gonzalez do seem to have never been published anywhere else. The interview has many similarities to her other interviews, but that may just be because she was getting asked the same questions over and over. It was certainly one of the few times she mentioned how she didn’t understand the impulse to collect autographs. I quickly checked and didn’t see any previous article that this was an obvious translation of, so I’m going with the assumption that it’s a legitimate interview.

Unlike the earlier promotional article in Sonido, the movie is here referred to by its Mexican title, Guerreras de Nueva York. And Grease is called by its Mexican title, Vaselina.

NUEVAS ESTRELLAS: ROBIN JOHNSON

Por Mauricio Peña

“Si hay algo que defiendo ferozmente, es mi vida privada”, nos dice de entrada Robin Johnson al recibirnos en la suite de un hotel capitalino. Y sigue: “No lo digo porque me sienta incómoda al ver que la gente empieza a invadir mi mundo; no, después de todo sólo he filmado una película y nadie tiene obligación de reconocerme en la calle. Pero estoy convencida que si sigo en esto por más tiempo, empezarán las responsabilidades de otro tipo, como esconderse en público, soportar la intromisión de extraños cuando de piden autógrafos. Yo admiro profundamente a Bette Midler pe ro nunca me atrevería a pedirle un autógrafo; no la molestaría con una tontería de esa clase.”

Robin Johnson es una muchacha de 17 años, la única película que ha protagonizado se llama “Guerreras de Nueva York” (Times Square).

Es de las nuevas actrices de cine, que crecieron con otro concepto de lo que es una actriz de cine; Robin es el ejemplo de la antiestrella: una ¡oven espontánea, que habla y dice lo que piensa. “Si llego a film otra película o más, nunca iré a vivir a Hollywood; prefiero que se haga en Nueva York, donde vivo, donde está mi familia, mis amigos, mi propio ambiente”.

Algo puede suceder con la carrera cinematográfica de Robin Johnson. Tiene un contrato para hacer otras películas y grabar discos con la organización de Robert Stigwood. “De aquí a febrero estoy a la expectativa de hacer una película o dos, y grabar un al bum, pero todavía no se eligen las canciones. Existe el proyecto de Robert Stigwood, para hacer la secuela de ‘Vaselina”, y allí me quieren poner. Me encanta la idea de seguir haciendo películas musicales, o donde la música tenga gran importancia, como en la primera”.

Muchos se preguntarán entonces, ¿porqué escogió uivá carrera artística en la cual no está segura de cumplir al ciento por ciento en cuanto a obligaciones se refiere?

“Tengo 17 años, apenas voy a terminar mis estudios y mi familia quiere que siga el camino de la universidad. Allí también hay muchas cosas que puedo estudiar. Me gusta el ambientedel cine, aunque nunca he tomado clases de una manera rigurosa y formal; tengo muy buenos recuerdos de mi primera película, pero piensp que el día de mañana alguna otra cosa muy distinta también me va a llamar la atención”.

Robin dice que en su familia: padre, madre y una hermana mayor que ella, no le criticaron mucho el que haya ido a probar suerte en el cine. “No me empujan para que siga en este medio, abandone la casa o los estudios; para esta cuestión de la carrera como actriz, me dejan que haga yo sola mis decisiones. No tenía ninguna experiencia cuando fui a solicitar el papel protagónico de ‘Guerrera de Nueva York’. Hice una prueba después de algunos contratiempos. Tenía mucha inquietud pero ninguna experiencia”.

Es una jovencita independiente y decidida; tiene una voz ron ca, pero al mismo tiempo muy dulce y femenina. Es muy sana y conoce muy bien los peligros a los cuales están orilladas muchas actrices jóvenes, cuando les llega su trozo de celebridad y triunfo. “No quiero segúir el esquema de todas las actrices que se involucran demasiado en su carrera, que enloquecen con ella, que al teran su vida familiar y caen a veces en garras de la droga o se suicidan con alcohol”.

En la película de su debut, Robin Johnson trabajó con Trini Alvarado, y dice de ella: “es una gran amiga”. Acerca del actor inglés Tim Curry, que hace el papel de un disc jockey de estación de radio en “Guerreras de Nueva York”, Robin nos dice: “No llegamos a ser grandes amigos, pero es admirable verlo trabajar; es una gente muy rigurosa, se encierra a meditar cada escena, es de los actores con método a los que puedes aprenderles muchas cosas. Es envidiable su trabajo. Yo no tengo ningún método, soy lo que podría considerarse: una actriz natural”.

(Las fotos de este reportaje son de Raul “Speedy” Gonzalez).

NEW STARS: ROBIN JOHNSON

By Mauricio Peña

“If there’s one thing I defend fiercely, it’s my private life,” Robin Johnson tells us as she enters the suite of a hotel in the capital. And she continues: “I’m not just saying that because I feel uncomfortable seeing people start invading my world; no, after all I’ve just filmed a movie and nobody is obligated to recognize me on the street. But I’m convinced that if I do this long enough, I’ll have to start laying low in public, to endure the intrusion of strangers asking for autographs. I deeply admire Bette Midler, but I would never dare to ask her for an autograph; I wouldn’t bother her with nonsense like that.”

Robin Johnson is a 17-year-old girl; the only film that she has starred in is called “Warriors of New York” (Times Square).

She is one of the new film actresses, who grew up with a different concept of what a film actress is; Robin is an example of the anti-star: a spontaneous woman who speaks and says what she thinks. “If I get to film another movie or more, I will never go live in Hollywood; I’d prefer it to be done in New York, where I live, where my family is, my friends, my own environment.”

Something may come of Robin Johnson’s film career. She has a contract to do other movies and make records with Robert Stigwood’s organization. “From now until February I’m expecting to make a movie or two, and record an album, but the songs are not yet chosen. There’s Robert Stigwood’s project to do the sequel to ‘Grease,’ and they want to put me in it. I love the idea of continuing to make musical films, or where music plays a big part, like in the first one. ”

Many will wonder then, why did she choose an artistic career in which she is not 100 percent sure of meeting her responsibilities?

“I’m 17 years old, I’m just going to finish my studies and my family wants me to go to college. There are also many things I can study. I like the film world, but I have never taken classes in a rigorous and formal way; I have very good memories of my first film, but I think that tomorrow something different will also grab my attention.”

Robin says that her family — father, mother and older sister — weren’t critical of her trying her luck in the movies. “They’re not pushing me to continue in this medium, leave home or my studies, as far as a career as an actress, they let me make my decisions alone. I had no experience when I tried out for the leading role of ‘Warriors Of New York.’ I auditioned after a few setbacks. I had a lot of worries but no experience.”

She is an independent and determined young woman; her voice is hoarse, but at the same time very sweet and feminine. She is very healthy and knows very well the dangers to which many young actresses are exposed when they attain celebrity and success. “I don’t want to follow in the footsteps of all the actresses who are invested too much in their career, who go crazy with it; they lose their family and sometimes get hooked on drugs or kill themselves with alcohol.”

In her debut film, Robin Johnson worked with Trini Alvarado, and says of her, “She’s a great friend.” About the English actor Tim Curry, who plays the role of a radio station disc jockey in “Warriors of New York”, Robin tells us, “We’re not going to be close friends, but I admire watching him working; he’s very rigorous, he meditates alone on every scene, he’s a method actor who you can learn a lot from. His work is enviable. I have no method, I am what you could call a natural actress.”

(Photos by Raul “Speedy” Gonzalez)

As always, if anyone has a better translation, please feel free to pass it along.

Photos by Raul “Speedy” Gonzalez:

 

 

Mauricio Peña, “Nuevas estrellas: Robin Johnson” (article, AAT ID: 300048715)
Suplemento de espectaculos el heraldo de Mexico, No. 820, August 9 1981, p. 1 (supplement (document genre), AAT ID: 300027363)
35.7 x 27.9 cm., 8 pp. (work);
Suplemento de Espectaculos El Heraldo de Mexico No 820 1981-08-09_p1 manual_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 849 px (W), 96 dpi, 659 kb
Robin_Johnson_1_p1 manual_800px.jpg
800 px (H) x 700 px (W), 96 dpi, 537 kb
Robin_Johnson_2_p1 manual_800px.jpg
800 px (H) x 683 px (W), 96 dpi, 545 kb (images)
 
©1981 El Heraldo de México

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Guerreras de Nueva York (Times Square lobby card, Mexico, 1981)

Posted on 17th August 2018 in "Times Square"
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Mexican lobby card for the film "Guerreras de Nueva York," 1981 ("Times Square," 1980)

Mexico’s Guerreras de Nueva York got at least one lobby card, too, and here it is, with the same photo used on two items in Karen Dean’s (DefeatedandGifted’s) collection: one of three lobby cards from somewhere that used the US logo, but had EMI as the film’s distributor; and a pull-out poster from an unidentified magazine.

Organización Apolo, S.A. presenta a
ROBIN JOHNSON
TRINI ALVARADO
TIM CURRY en

Guerreras de Nueva York

NO SOMOS INOCENTES…
NO SOMOS CULPABLES…
¡SOMOS JOVENES!

Director ALAN MOYLE

Organización Apolo, S.A. presents
ROBIN JOHNSON
TRINI ALVARADO
TIM CURRY in

Warriors of New York

WE ARE NOT INNOCENT…
WE ARE NOT GUILTY…
WE ARE YOUNG!

Director ALAN MOYLE

 

 

Guerreras de Nueva York
Lobby card (AAT ID: 300208593)
27.6 x 35.6 cm. (10.9 x 14 in.)
Mexico (work);
Times_Square_Mexican_Lobby_Card_1981_1080px.jpg
839 x 1080 px, 96 dpi, 479 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Guerreras de Nueva York (Times Square movie poster, Mexico, 1981)

Posted on 5th August 2018 in "Times Square"
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1981 Mexican movie poster for TIMES SQUARE (1980)  Text:  NO SOMOS CRIMINALES... Y SI NOS TRATAN COMO TAL USAREMOS ANTIFAZ  NO NECESITAMOS ANTIDEPRESIVOS QUEREMOS AMOR  NO SOMOS INOCENTES... NO SOMOS CULPABLES... SOMOS JOVENES  NO SOMOS GOLFAS... AYUDENOS A VIVIR  ORGANIZACION APOLO, S.A. Presenta a ROBIN JOHNSON • TRINI ALVARADO • TIM CURRY en Guerreras de Nueva York Director ALAN MOYLE  Un Film de Robert Stigwood   [WE ARE NOT CRIMINALS ... AND IF WE'RE TREATED THAT WAY WE'LL WEAR MASKS  WE DO NOT NEED ANTIDEPRESSANTS WE WANT LOVE  WE ARE NOT INNOCENT ... WE ARE NOT GUILTY ... WE ARE YOUNG  WE ARE NOT WHORES ... HELP US TO LIVE  APOLO ORGANIZATION, S.A. Presents ROBIN JOHNSON • TRINI ALVARADO • TIM CURRY in Warriors of New York Director ALAN MOYLE  A Film by Robert Stigwood]

Warriors of New York came out in Mexico in 1981, and its poster was a collage of publicity stills and the European poster painting. To my mind, though, the most interesting thing about it, even more than the new title, is that Robin Johnson has top billing, and Tim Curry is reduced to third. I can only assume that, even more than in the rest of the world, she was the film’s major selling point in Mexico.

Clockwise from top left: an edit of the photo that ran in Film Review Vol 31 No 1, on an Italian lobby poster, and on the back of the Japanese promo flyer and in the Japanese souvenir program book (in the movie, Nicky holds the microphone in her other hand); a shot of the final concert that I think is making its first appearance here; a larger crop of a shot that appeared in the Japanese program book, and which appeared in an even larger crop on a lobby card whose provenance I’m unsure of (part of the collection of Karen Dean (DefeatedandGifted); I’ve assumed they’re Australian, but I don’t know — they use the American logo but identify the distributor as EMI, not AFD); a shot whose last appearance was in the Japanese program book, and you know what, you can find its previous appearances listed in that post; the painting by Cummins that first appeared on the UK movie poster and on most of the European posters after; and a shot that previously appeared in the “Press Folder,” as a UK lobby card, and in Joepie No. 365.

Here’s the text, along with my feeble attempt at a translation. As always, I welcome any corrections.

NO SOMOS CRIMINALES… Y SI NOS TRATAN COMO TAL USAREMOS ANTIFAZ

NO NECESITAMOS ANTIDEPRESIVOS
QUEREMOS AMOR

NO SOMOS INOCENTES… NO SOMOS CULPABLES… SOMOS JOVENES

NO SOMOS GOLFAS… AYUDENOS A VIVIR

ORGANIZACION APOLO, S.A. Presenta a
ROBIN JOHNSON • TRINI ALVARADO • TIM CURRY en
Guerreras de Nueva York
Director ALAN MOYLE

Un Film de
Robert Stigwood

WE ARE NOT CRIMINALS … AND IF WE’RE TREATED THAT WAY WE’LL WEAR MASKS

WE DO NOT NEED ANTIDEPRESSANTS
WE WANT LOVE

WE ARE NOT INNOCENT … WE ARE NOT GUILTY … WE ARE YOUNG

WE ARE NOT WHORES … HELP US TO LIVE

APOLO ORGANIZATION, S.A. Presents
ROBIN JOHNSON • TRINI ALVARADO • TIM CURRY in
Warriors of New York
Director ALAN MOYLE

A Film by
Robert Stigwood

Further reading:

Film Review Vol 31 No 1
Italian lobby poster 2 of 2
Japanese promo flyer
Japanese souvenir program book, pp. 1-7
Japanese souvenir program book, pp. 12-13
Japanese souvenir program book, pp. 20-24
Movie poster, UK
Movie poster, Belgium
Movie poster, Italy
Movie poster, Spain
Movie poster, Yugoslavia

 

 

Guerreras de Nueva York
Mexico : poster : AAT ID: 300027221 : 42.2 x 55.9 cm : 1981 (work);
Times_Square_Movie_Poster_Mexico_1981_1080px.jpg
829 x 1080 px, 96 dpi, 553 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Música Original de la Película TIMES SQUARE (soundtrack album, Mexican edition, 1981)

Posted on 24th July 2018 in "Times Square"
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This is the last version of the soundtrack album I have, and the one in the worst condition. I’ve seen one or two other copies and they were as beat up as this one is. They might have had their spines intact, where this one’s is completely worn away (which is why I have no picture of it), but that didn’t seem enough to justify buying another copy. This one also didn’t have the paper picture sleeves. I don’t know if they were issued with the Mexican edition or not.

The most interesting thing about this edition is that all the text is in Spanish.


TIMES SQUARE original soundtrack album, Mexico, 1981, gatefold interior  Text:  Producido por ROBERT STIGWOOD AND JAC0B BRACKMAN  Dirigido por ALAN MOYLE       Distribuido por EMI ROBERT STIGWOOD Presenta "TIMES SQUARE"  Protagonistas  TIM CURRY  TRINI ALVARADO  y presentando a ROBIN JOHNSON como Nicky   Con PETER COFFIELD  HERBERT BERGHOF  DAVID MARGULIES ANNA MARIA HORSFORD   Vestuario ROBERT deMORA  Escenografía STUART WURTZEL Una historia de ALAN MOYLE AND  LEANNE UNGER Guion  JACOB BRACKMAN  Edicion TOM PRIESTLEY Productores Ejecutivos KEVIN McCORMICK JOHN NICOLELLA       Productor Asociado BILL OAKES       Director de Fotografía JAMES A. CONTNER

All the other editions of the soundtrack seem to have been issued simultaneously in 1980, but this one is dated 1981. It also has a unique version of the cover art: where the US edition has the familiar face of Tim Curry as Johnny LaGuardia on Nicky’s badge, and the Canadian, French, and Peruvian editions had a blank red spot, and the UK edition had nothing at all, the Mexican version has a painted red blank badge, imitating the paint-smeared style of the rest of the cover.

The Peruvian edition had some of the song titles in Spanish on its labels, and interestingly, they’re not all identical to the titles here. For instance, “Help Me!” in Peru is “Ayúdenme,” and in Mexico it’s “Ayudame.” “Babylon’s Burning” in Peru is “El incendio de Babylon,” and in Mexico, “Babilonia se quema.” I suppose it shouldn’t be surprising that Mexican Spanish and Peruvian Spanish are different, but as a speaker of neither it’s fascinating to see evidence.

[FRONT:]

Música Original de la Película
TIMES
SQUARE
Una Producción de ROBERT STIGWOOD
LPR 16370 A2 ESTEREO
Presentando música de:
SUZI QUATRQ, THE PRETENDERS, R0XY MUSIC,
GARY NUMAN, MARCY LEVY & ROBIN GIBB, TALKING HEADS, JOE JACKSON,
XTC, THE RAMONES, ROBIN JOHNSON & TRINI ALVARADO,
THE RUTS, D.L. BYRON. LOU REED, DESMOND CHILD &, ROUGE,
GARLAND JEFFREYS, THE CURE, PATTT SMITH GROUP, DAVID JOHANSEN.

[GATEFOLD:]

Producido por ROBERT STIGWOOD AND JAC0B BRACKMAN Dirigido por ALAN MOYLE Distribuido por EMI
ROBERT STIGWOOD Presenta “TIMES SQUARE” Protagonistas TIM CURRY TRINI ALVARADO y presentando a ROBIN JOHNSON como Nicky Con PETER COFFIELD HERBERT BERGHOF DAVID MARGULIES
ANNA MARIA HORSFORD Vestuario ROBERT deMORA Escenografía STUART WURTZEL
Una historia de ALAN MOYLE AND LEANNE UNGER
Guion JACOB BRACKMAN
Edicion TOM PRIESTLEY
Productores Ejecutivos KEVIN McCORMICK JOHN NICOLELLA
Productor Asociado BILL OAKES
Director de Fotografía JAMES A. CONTNER

[BACK:]

LPR 16370 A2 ESTEREO
1 MCR 91010

Disco 1 Lado 1
“ROCK HARD” – SUZI QUATRO
ROCK PESADO 3:18 PRODUCIDO POR MIKE CHAPMAN
M. Chapman/N. Chinn (Chinnicap Publishing, Inc
Admin. in the U.S.A. & Canada by Careers Music, Inc.)
Cortesia de Dreamland Records, Inc. ℗ 1980 Dreamland Records. Inc.
“TALK OF THE TOWN”
– THE PRETENDERS
HABLA DEL PUEBLO 3:16 PRODUCIDO POR CHRIS THOMAS
C. Hynde (Al Gallico Music Corp.)
Cortesia de Sire Records, Inc./Real Records ℗ 1980 REAL RECORDS
“SAME OLD SCENE” – ROXY MUSIC
LA MISMA EXCENA 3:54 PRODUCIDO POR ROXY MUSIC Y RHETT DAVIES
B. Ferry (E. G. Music, Inc.)
Cortesia de E.G. Records, Ltd./Atlantic Recording Corp./Polydor
International ℗ 1980 Atlantic Recording Corporation
“DOWN IN THE PARK” – GARY NUMAN
EN EL PARQUE 4:20 PRODUCIDO POR GARY NUMAN
G. Numan (Geoff & Eddie Music, Inc. and Blackwood Music Inc)
Cortesia de Wea Records, Ltd.?Beggars Banquet Limited
℗1979 A. Beggars Banquet Recording
“HELP ME!”
– MARCY LEVY & ROBIN GIBB
AYUDAME 3:37 PRODUCIDO POR ROBIN GIBB AND BLUE WEAVER
R. Gibb/B. Weaver (Stigwood Music, Inc. (Unichappell Music, Admin.)
℗1980 Yam, Inc.

Lado 2
“LIFE DURING WARTIME”
– TALKING HEADS
LA VIDA DURANTE LA GUERRA 3:40 PRODUCIDO POR BRIAN ENO Y TALKING HEADS
D. Byrne (Index Music/Bleu Disque Music Co. Inc.)
Cortesia de Sire Records, Inc./Real Records ℗ 1979 Sire Records Company
“PRETTY BOYS” – JOE JACKSON
CHICOS GUAPOS 3:21 PRODUCIDO JOE JACKSON
J. Jackson (Albion Music, Ltd. (Admin by Almo Music Corp. in
the U.S. & Canada) Cortesia de A. & M. Records, Inc.
℗1980 Multiplier N. V.
“TAKE THIS TOWN” – XTC
TOMEN ESTE PUEBLO 4:07 PRODUCICO POR STEVE LILLYWHITE
A. Partridge (Nymph Music (Unichappell Music, Admin.)
Cortesia de Virgin Records, Ltd. ℗1980 Virgin Records, Ltd.
“I WANNA BE SEDATED” – THE RAMONES
QUIERO ESTAR TRANQUILO 2:229 PRODUCIDO POR T. ERDELYI Y ED STASIUM
The ramones (Bleu Disque Music Co. Inc./Taco Tunes, Inc.)
Cortesia de Sire Records, Inc./Real Records ℗1979 SIre Records, Inc.
“DAMN DOG” – ROBIN JOHNSON
PERRO MALDITO 2:40 PRODUCIDO POR BILL OAKES
INGENIERO: THOM PANUNZIO – B. Mernit/J. Brackman
(Stigwood Music, Inc. (Unichappell Music, Admin)
℗1980 Multiplier N.V.

Disco 2 Lado 1
“YOUR DAUGHTER IS ONE”
– ROBIN JOHNSON & TRINI ALVARADO
TU HIJA ES UNICA 2:10 PRODUCIDO POR BILL OAKES
INGENIERO: JOHN PACE – B. Mernit/N. Ross/S. Brackman
(Stigwood Music, Inc. (Unichappell Music, Admin)
℗1980 Multiplier N.V.
“BABYLON’S BURNING” – THE RUTS
BABILONIA SE QUEMA 2:34 ARREGLOS Y PRODUCCION DE MICK GLOSSOP
J. Jennings/D. Ruffy/M. Owen/P. Fox (Nymph Music (Unichappel
Music, Admin.) Cortesia de Virgin Records, Ltd. P 1979 Virgin Records, Ltd.
“YOU CAN’T HURRY LOVE” – D.L. BYRON
NO PUEDES APRESURAR EL AMOR 3:04 PRODUCIDO POR JIMMY IOVINE CON JON SMALL
E. Holland/L. Dozier/B. Holland (Stone Agate Music Division)
Cortesia de Arista Records, Inc. ℗1980 Arista Records, Inc.
“WALK ON THE WILD SIDE”
– LOU REED
VE POR EL CAMINO DIFICIL 4:12 PRODUCIDO POR DAVID BOWIE Y MICK RONSON
L. Reed (Oakfield Avenue Music, Ltd.)
Cortesia de RCA Records ℗1972 RCA Records
“THE NIGHT WAS NOT”
– DESMOND CHILD & ROUGE
NO FUE EN LA NOCHE 3:08 PRODUCIDO POR RICHARD LANDIS Y D.C. ASSOCIATE PRODUCTIONS
D. Child (Desmobile Music Co.)
Cortesia de Capitol records, Inc. ℗1979 Capitol Records, Inc.

Lado 2
“INNOCENT, NOT GUILTY”
– GARLAND JEFFREYS
INOCENTE, NO CULPABALE 2:13 PRODUCIDO POR GARLAND JEFFREYS Y BILL OAKES
INGENIERO: JOHN PACE – G. Jeffreys (Garland Jeffreys Music
℗1980 Multiplier N.V.
“GRINDING HALT”
– THE CURE
DETENTE 2:49 PRODUCIDO POR CHRIS PARRY
L. Tolhurst/M. Dempsey/R. Smith (APB Music Co. Ltd.)
Cortesia de Fiction Records/Polydor Ltd./Jem Records
℗1979 Fiction Records
“PISSING IN THE RIVER”
PATTI SMITH GROUP
EN EL RIO 4:41 PRODUCIDO POR JACK DOUGLAS
P. Smith/ I. Kral (Linda’s Music Corp.)
Cortesia de Arits Records, Inc. ℗1976 Arista Records, INc.
“FLOWERS IN THE CITY”
– DAVID JOHANSEN & ROBIN JOHNSON
FLORES EN LA CIUDAD 3:58 PRODUCIDO POR DAVID JOHANSEN
INGENIERO: HARVEY GOLDGERG – D. Johansen/R. Guy
(Buster Poindexter, Inc. and Purple Man Publishing.)
Cortesia de Blue Sky Records, Inc./CBS Records ℗1980 Blue Sky Records, Inc.
“DAMN DOG” — ROBIN JOHNSON
(Reprise – The Cleo Club)
PERRO MALDITO 2:40 PRODUCIDO POR BILL OAKES
B. Mernit/J. Brackman (Stigwood Music, Inc. (Unichappell Music, Admin.)
℗1980 Multiplier N.V.

Productor Ejecutivo de Album: Bill Oakes

RSO

MUY IMPORTANTE
Este fonograma es una obra intelectual protegida en favor de su productor
℗ 1981 POLYGRAM RECORD ORGANIZATION Derechos protegidos
La titularidad de los derechos contenidos en el fonograma se encuentra reconocida
e inscrita en el Registro Público del Derecho de Autor
Dirección General del Derecho de Autor – Secreteria de Educación Pública
SE PROHIBE SU COPIA O REPRODUCCION PARCIAL O TOTAL
La violacion de esta prohibición esta penada conforme a los Articulos
386 del Codico Penal y 135 y 136 de la Ley Federal sobre el Derecho de Autor, vigentes

2658 145

℗ 1981 HECHO EN MEXICO / DISTRIBUIDO POR
POlYGram DISCOS, S. A. se C. V.

MIEMBRO ACTIVO DE amprofon.
(Asociación Mexicana de Productores de Fonogramas, A. C.)

[SIDE 1:]

HECHO EN MEXICO
DISTRIBUIDO POR POLYDOR, S.A.
MARCA REGISTRADA
RESERVADOS TODOS LOS
DERECHOS DEL PRODUCTOR FONOGRAFICO Y DE LA OBRA
PROHIBIDA SU EJECUCION PUBLICA CON FINES DE LUCRO

RSO

16370/A2
2658 145
2479 264

1
DISCO 1

℗ 1980

MUSCIA ORIGINAL DE LA PELICULA
“TIMES SQUARE”
Productor Ejecutivo: BILL OAKES

1. ROCK PESADO (Hard rock) 3:18
-M. Chapman-N. Chinn- *SUZI QUATRO*

2. HABLA DEL PUEBLO (Talk of the town) 3:16
-C. Hynde- *THE PRETENDERS*

3. LA MISMA ESCENA (Same old scene) 3:54
-B. Ferry- *ROXY MUSIC*

4. EN EL PARQUE (Down in the park) 4:20
-G. Numan- *GARY NUMAN*

5. AYUDAME (Help me!) 3:37
-R. Gibb-B. Weaver- *MARCY LEVY Y ROBIN GIBB*

[SIDE 2:]

HECHO EN MEXICO
DISTRIBUIDO POR POLYDOR, S.A.
MARCA REGISTRADA
RESERVADOS TODOS LOS
DERECHOS DEL PRODUCTOR FONOGRAFICO Y DE LA OBRA
PROHIBIDA SU EJECUCION PUBLICA CON FINES DE LUCRO

RSO

16370/2A
2658 145
2479 264

2
DISCO 1

℗ 1980

MUSCIA ORIGINAL DE LA PELICULA
“TIMES SQUARE”
Productor Ejecutivo: BILL OAKES

1. LA VIDA DURANTE LA GUERRA (Life during wartime) 3:40
-D. Byrne- *TALKING HEADS*

2. CHICOS GUAPOS (Pretty boys) 3:21
-J. Jackson- *JOE JACKSON*

3. TOMEN ESTE PUEBLO (Take this town) 4:07
-A. Partridge- *XTC*

4. QUIERO ESTAR TRANQUILO (I wanna be sedated) 2:29
-The Ramones- *THE RAMONES*

5. PERRO MALDITO (Damn dog) 2:40
-B. Mernit-J. Brackman- *ROBIN JOHNSON*

[SIDE 3:]

HECHO EN MEXICO
DISTRIBUIDO POR POLYDOR, S.A.
MARCA REGISTRADA
RESERVADOS TODOS LOS
DERECHOS DEL PRODUCTOR FONOGRAFICO Y DE LA OBRA
PROHIBIDA SU EJECUCION PUBLICA CON FINES DE LUCRO

RSO

16370/A2
2658 145
2479 264

1
DISCO 2

℗ 1980

MUSCIA ORIGINAL DE LA PELICULA
“TIMES SQUARE”
Productor Ejecutivo: BILL OAKES

1. TU HIJA ES UNICA (Your daughter is one) 2:10
-B. Mernit-N. Ross-J. Brackman- *ROBIN JOHNSON AND TRINI ALVARADO*

2. BABILONIA SE QUEMA (Babylon’s burning) 2:34
-J. Jennings-D. Ruffy-M. Owen-P. Fox- *THE RUTS*

3. NO PUEDES APRESURAR EL AMOR (You can’t hurry love) 3:04
-E. Holland-L. Dozier-B. Holland- *D.L. BYRON*

4. VE POR EL CAMINO DIFICIL (Walk on the wild side) 4:12
-L. Reed- *LOU REED*

5. NO FUE EN LA NOCHE (The night was not) 3:08
-D. Child- *DESMOND CHILD AND ROUGE*

[SIDE 4:]

HECHO EN MEXICO
DISTRIBUIDO POR POLYDOR, S.A.
MARCA REGISTRADA
RESERVADOS TODOS LOS
DERECHOS DEL PRODUCTOR FONOGRAFICO Y DE LA OBRA
PROHIBIDA SU EJECUCION PUBLICA CON FINES DE LUCRO

RSO

16370/2A
2658 145
2479 264

2
DISCO 2

℗ 1980

MUSCIA ORIGINAL DE LA PELICULA
“TIMES SQUARE”
Productor Ejecutivo: BILL OAKES

1. INOCENTE, NO CULPABLE (Innocent, not guilty) 2:13
-G. Jeffreys- *GARLAND JEFFREYS*

2. DENTENTE (Grinding halt) 2:49
-L. Tolhurst-M. Dempsey-R. Smith- *THE CURE*

3. EN EL RIO (Pissing in the river) 4:41
-P. Smith-I. Kral- *PATTI SMITH GROUP*

4. FLORES DE LA CIUDAD (Flowers in the city) 3:58
-D. Johansen-R. Guy- *DAVID JOHANSEN Y ROBIN JOHNSON*

5. PERRO MALDITO (Reprise-The Cleo Club) (Damn dog) 2:40
-B. Mernit-J. Brackman- *ROBIN JOHNSON*

Other editions of the soundtrack:

US
Canada
UK
France
Peru
Cassette (Canada)
8-track (US)

 

Música Original de la Película TIMES SQUARE, RSO LPR 16370 A2; Mexico, 1981; 2 long-playing records (AAT 300265802) with gatefold picture sleeve (AAT 300266823)(work);
 
©1980 Multiplier N.V.
℗1981 POLYGRAM RECORD ORGANIZATION

 

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SONIDO – la revista musical, No. 56, June 1981

Posted on 12th July 2018 in "Times Square"
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Mexican pop music magazine featuring article on TIMES SQUARE.  Text:  NUMERO 56  $30 00  SONIDO 'a musical  ROD STEWART THREE SOULS BEATLES DANGEROUS RHYTHM  ¡¡¡LA NUEVA EXPLOSION DEL ROCK PESADO¡¡¡

 

 

 

 

The June 1981 issue of the Mexican pop music magazine Sonido contained on pages 38 and 39 an article credited to “Vicco,” but which seems to be exactly the same kind of AFD/RSO-written publicity published in English in similar magazines a year before.

The article calls the film Times Square. It wasn’t released under that title in Mexico, though, as we shall see.

The accompanying photos are the ubiquitous TS-72-8A/14, TS-66-28/9, and TS-82-30[/4], all three of which were part of the US Press Material pack.

POR: vicco

TIMES SQUARE es un drama contemporáneo,con música estelarizada por los talentos de Tim Curry, cantante y actor británico que se dio a conocer con El show de terror de Rocky; Trini Alvarado, quien tuvo un importante papel en la película de Robert Altman Rich kids, y Robin Johnson, una actriz proveniente de Brooklin, muy dinámica y que canta también en su debut cinematográfico.

La película fue filmada en diversas locaciones de Nueva York, incluyendo el infame Deuce y es resaltada por veinte canciones originales ejemplificando algo de lo mejor del rock contemporáneo interpretadas por los más importantes artistas del momento, así como por las dos estrellas de la cinta, Robin Johnson y Trini Alvarado.

Times square retrata las desventuras de dos chiquillas rebeldonas, una proveniente de un ambiente sofisticado y, la otra, producto de las calles. Juntas desde el cuarto de un hospital neurológico comienzan una serie de bizarras escapadas y su comportamiento es reportado por un disc-jockey que trabaja toda la noche en una estación de radio y que las anima a seguir con sus trucos y logra convertirlas en celebridades menores de los medios. Ellas pasan sobre todas las autoridades llegando al climax en una escena sobre la marquesina del teatro Times Square con cientos de seguidores rindiendo su tributo.

Dicha cinta es una presentación de Robert Stigwood y fue producida por Stigwood y Jacob Brackman, dirigida por Alan Moyle, basada en una historia de Moyle y Leanne Unger. Kevin McCormick y John Nicollela son los productores ejecutivos y Bill Oakes es productor asociado.

LA MUSICA
En un momento en que la música de películas se encuentra entre los discos más populares y cuando ha sido entendida como un vehículo muy importante para la aceptación de una cinta, aparece un nuevo álbum doble en discos RSO con la música de la película Times square, uno de los más excitantes que han sido lanzados, pues no sólo captura el espíritu de la película, sino que es además una antología única de canciones interpretadas por los mejores artistas de rock del momento, tanto de Inglaterra como de Estados Unidos, incluyendo a Suzi Qautro, The Pretenders, Roxy Music, Gary Numan, The Talking Heads, Joe Jackson, The Patti Smith Group, XTC, The Cure, Lou Reed,The Ramones, The Ruts, David Johansen y muchos otros. ¡Es un álbum espectacular!

v

BY: vicco

TIMES SQUARE is a contemporary drama, with music, starring the talents of Tim Curry, singer and British actor who became known in The Rocky Horror Picture Show; Trini Alvarado, who had an important role in Robert Altman’s movie Rich Kids, and Robin Johnson, an actress from Brooklyn, very dynamic and who also sings in her film début.

The movie was filmed in diverse locations of New York, including the infamous Deuce, and it is highlighted by twenty original songs exemplifying some of the best contemporary rock performed by today’s most important artists, as well as by both stars of the film, Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado.

Times Square portrays the misfortunes of two little girl rebels, one from a sophisticated environment and, the other one, a product of the streets. Together from the room of a neurological hospital they begin a series of bizarre escapades and their behavior is reported by a disc-jockey who works the overnight on a radio station and who encourages them to continue with their tricks and manages to turn them into minor media celebrities. They get past all the authorities, arriving at the climax in a scene on the marquee of the Times Square theatre with hundreds of followers paying tribute.

This film is a Robert Stigwood presentation and it was produced by Stigwood and Jacob Brackman, directed by Alan Moyle, based on a story by Moyle and Leanne Unger. Kevin McCormick and John Nicollela are the executive producers and Bill Oakes is the associate producer.

THE MUSIC

At a time when movie soundtracks are among the most popular records and when they have been understood as a very important vehicle for the acceptance of a film, a new double album appears on RSO Records with the music of the movie Times Square, one of the most exciting to be released, since it not only captures the spirit of the movie, but it is also a unique collection of songs performed by today’s greatest rock artists, from both England and the United States, including Suzi Qautro, The Pretenders, Roxy Music, Gary Numan, The Talking Heads, Joe Jackson, The Patti Smith Group, XTC, The Cure, Lou Reed, The Ramones, The Ruts, David Johansen and many others. It is a spectacular album!

v

 

 

vicco, “Cine-rock : Times Square” (article), AAT ID: 300048715)
SONIDO la revista musical, No. 56, June 1981, pp. 38-39 (magazine (periodical), AAT ID: 300215389)
20.2 (W) x 27.8 cm. (H), 64 pp (work);
Sonido, La Revista Musical Ano 1 Numero 56 Junio 1981 – 0001_1080px.jpg (cover)
1080 px (H) x 823 px (W), 96 dpi, 501 kb
Sonido, La Revista Musical Ano 1 Numero 56 Junio 1981_0037_1080px.jpg (p. 38)
1080 px (H) x 794 px (W), 96 dpi, 439 kb
Sonido, La Revista Musical Ano 1 Numero 56 Junio 1981_0038_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 804 px (W), 96 dpi, 466 kb (images)
 
SONIDO la revista musical ©1981 Corporación Editorial, S.A.

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Film Review Vol. 31 No. 2, February 1981

Posted on 30th June 2018 in "Times Square"
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Cover (p. 1) of Film Review Vol 31 No 2 February 1981

Contents entry from Film Review Vol 31 No 2 February 1981, contents page (p. 3)  text:  47 TIMES SQUARE Adventures of two teenage girls (Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado) and all-night disc jockey Tim Curry who gives a boost to their dream of rock stardom.

Times Square probably hadn’t had its January 15th opening yet when the February issue of Film Review came out. Unlike the article in the previous month’s issue, this isn’t a review at all, but a promotional summary of the film, with the exception of the backhanded compliment that most of the movie’s appeal is in the casting of Robin and Trini.

Film Review Vol 31 No 2 February 1981, p. 47  text:  HARD TIMES  Times Square is a movie about youth. New York and rebellion — with a prominent soundtrack of New Wave music. Two girls, from totally opposite backgrounds, find themselves thrown together in the same private ward undergoing psychiatric tests. In spite of their initial incongruity, the girls find a common link in that they have both been misunderstood for most of their young lives. In retaliation they escape their remedial surroundings and disappear into the heart of the Big Apple.  Nicky Marotta, the stronger, older and more street-wise of the two girls, instils a rebelliousness into the weaker, 12-year-old Pamela Pearl, and together they form a united attack against everything Pamela's father, and the bourgeois in general, stand for. Not before long the daring duo earn a certain infamy following a series of amusing and some rather more destructive pranks, including pilfering on the one hand and the levering of television sets off the top of New York apartment blocks on the other. With the assistance of a sympathetic DJ, the girls also gain air time and a wider notoriety, and are even allowed to sing their protest songs over the radio.  If it hadn't been for the casting of 15-year-old newcomer Robin Johnson as Nicky and Trini Alvarado (who played the lead in Robert Altman's Rich Kids) as Pamela, the film might well have lost a lot of the appeal it has. Tim Curry completes the billing as the DJ up against more than he can handle, with Peter Coffield as Pamela's short-sighted father.  Times Square is an EMI release and was directed by Alan Moyle, with songs by The Pretenders, Lou Reed, Suzi Quatro, Robin Johnson, and many others.  Times Square can also lay claim to being the first major release to present a look at New Wave music.  Tim Curry as the late-night DJ Robin Johnson as the rebellious Nicky Trini Alvarado as the introverted Pamela

HARD TIMES

Times Square is a movie about youth. New York and rebellion — with a prominent soundtrack of New Wave music. Two girls, from totally opposite backgrounds, find themselves thrown together in the same private ward undergoing psychiatric tests. In spite of their initial incongruity, the girls find a common link in that they have both been misunderstood for most of their young lives. In retaliation they escape their remedial surroundings and disappear into the heart of the Big Apple.

Nicky Marotta, the stronger, older and more street-wise of the two girls, instils a rebelliousness into the weaker, 12-year-old Pamela Pearl, and together they form a united attack against everything Pamela’s father, and the bourgeois in general, stand for. Not before long the daring duo earn a certain infamy following a series of amusing and some rather more destructive pranks, including pilfering on the one hand and the levering of television sets off the top of New York apartment blocks on the other. With the assistance of a sympathetic DJ, the girls also gain air time and a wider notoriety, and are even allowed to sing their protest songs over the radio.

If it hadn’t been for the casting of 15-year-old newcomer Robin Johnson as Nicky and Trini Alvarado (who played the lead in Robert Altman’s Rich Kids) as Pamela, the film might well have lost a lot of the appeal it has. Tim Curry completes the billing as the DJ up against more than he can handle, with Peter Coffield as Pamela’s short-sighted father.

Times Square is an EMI release and was directed by Alan Moyle, with songs by The Pretenders, Lou Reed, Suzi Quatro, Robin Johnson, and many others.

Times Square can also lay claim to being the first major release to present a look at New Wave music.

Tim Curry’s photo is UK Press Kit photo #4, which had been previously published in Mediascene Prevue Vol. 2 No. 2, Sept.-Oct. 1980, and The Aquarian, April 23-April 30 1980. Robin’s is TS-57-26/1 from the US Press Material folder, which was used for both the soundtrack album cover and the North American movie posters, and published, oh, lots of places previously. Seriously, I’m sure I’ve already listed them somewhere. Maybe next time it turns up I’ll do another reassessment, but not today.

The unusually sultry photo of Trini, however, hasn’t appeared anywhere else, as far as I know.

 

Why did I say earlier that the movie hadn’t opened yet? Because there was an ad announcing its opening on page 10.

TIMES SQUARE movie advertisement, from Film Review Vol 31 No 2 February 1981, p. 10

This is the exact same ad I posted on December 7, 2016. Yes, we now know that someone cut up a copy of this magazine and sold the pieces, and yep, I bought one. It’s a shame that these artifacts tend to be worth more sold by the half-page, but here we are.

 

(Yeah, this post should have gone up over a year ago, probably between Films Illustrated, Vol. 10 No. 113 and Movie 81 No. 2. I had everything ready to go, and somehow accidentally passed over it. Well, here it is now.)

 

The previous posts mentioned above (except for the many soundtrack and poster variants):

Film Review, Vol. 31 No. 1, January 1981
Times Square UK Press Kit (post 2 of 4)
Times Square isn’t a punk picture”
“The Trend Settles in New York”
Times Square Press Material folder (post 1 of 5)
UK Movie Ad
Films Illustrated, Vol. 10 No. 113
Movie 81 No. 2

 

 

Hard times (article, AAT ID: 300048715)
Film Review Vol. 31 No. 2, February 1981, p. 47 (magazine (periodical), AAT ID: 300215389)
29.6 x 21.2 cm. (work);
1981-02 TS Film Review Feb 1981 V31 N2 – 0002_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 771 px (W), 96 dpi, 520 kb
1981-02 TS Film Review Feb 1981 V31 N2 – 0004_p3_detail_800px.jpg
235 px (H) x 800 px (W), 96 dpi, 114 kb
1981-02 TS Film Review Feb 1981 V31 N2 – 0007_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 762 px (W), 96 dpi, 410 kb
1981-02 TS Film Review Feb 1981 V31 N2 – 0007_image_1_800px.jpg
688 px (H) x 800 px (W), 96 dpi, 242 kb
1981-02 TS Film Review Feb 1981 V31 N2 – 0007_image_2_800px.jpg
800 px (H) x 474 px (W), 96 dpi, 188 kb
1981-02 TS Film Review Feb 1981 V31 N2 – 0007_image_3_800px.jpg
800 px (H) x 473 px (W), 96 dpi, 184 kb
(images)
 

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Robin and Trini “Bandphotos”, UK 1981

Posted on 18th June 2018 in "Times Square"
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More recently-turned-up Times Square publicity from England. Exactly how these fit in with the rest of it, I’m not sure. I’m guessing they were relatively early UK publicity, since the photos still have the American numbers on them. Perhaps before their own publicity machine got going, EMI contracted with Alan Band to send out photos of the stars. So, maybe there’s a Tim Curry Bandphoto out there somewhere as well.

The photo of Robin is her out-of-costume headshot, the only one she or any of the cast got. We’ve previously seen the American version and another UK version distributed by ITC, one of the movie’s co-producing companies. Looking at them now, the US version has been shrunk to fit with the AFD caption at the bottom, while the ITC version looks like its caption stripe has been placed over top of this Bandphoto version. The Bandphoto caption has been severely edited from the one accompanying the other two, which read “Robin Johnson makes her motion picture acting and singing debut after being discovered by chance at her high school in Brooklyn for the co-starring role with Tim Curry and Trini Alvarado in ‘Times Square.'”

The photo of Trini in costume as Pammy is the one used on the US movie poster and the soundtrack album cover. It was included in the US Press Material folder and appeared in the AFD Campaign Pressbook. The Bandphoto caption, judging by the initials, was edited by Alan Band himself to be far more breathlessly exciting than the US caption had been (“Trini Alvarado, who made an impressive screen debut in Robert Altman’s “Rich Kids,” now is co-starred with Robin Johnson and portrays Pamela Pearl, troubled daughter of an ambitious politician, who becomes a runaway and a rebel against authority in “Times Square.”)

The blue Bandphoto stamps read:

MUST
RETURN

CREDIT
BANDPHOTO
ALAN BAND ASSOCIATES
25 LONGDOWN ROAD
FARNHAM, SURREY, ENGLAND

I’m surprised that this particular photo of Trini — this specific print — is maybe the only item I’ve found that’s showing any age-related image problems (the discoloration along her left cheek). Considering their age, all the Times Square items I’ve come across have held up remarkably well.

The previous posts mentioned above:

Robin Johnson’s Times Square Headshot, “TS-Spec.3”
Headshot, ITC version
Times Square Press Material folder (post 2 of 5)
AFD Campaign Pressbook (pages 1-4)

 

 

TS-Special/3
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347
UK ; 22.9 x 20.1 cm. (work)
TS-Special 3 auto_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 951 px (W), 96 dpi, 235 kb (image)

TS-Special 3 back_layers_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 953 px (W), 96 dpi, 211 kb (image)

TS-11-25/5
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347
UK ; 23.2 x 20.2 cm. (work)
TS-11-24-5 Trini headshot UK_auto_layers_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 940 px (W), 96 dpi, 329 kb (image)

TS-11-24-5 Trini headshot UK_back_manual_layers_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 940 px (W), 96 dpi, 257 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+