SONIDO – la revista musical, No. 56, June 1981

Posted on 12th July 2018 in "Times Square"
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on RedditPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone

Mexican pop music magazine featuring article on TIMES SQUARE.  Text:  NUMERO 56  $30 00  SONIDO 'a musical  ROD STEWART THREE SOULS BEATLES DANGEROUS RHYTHM  ¡¡¡LA NUEVA EXPLOSION DEL ROCK PESADO¡¡¡

 

 

 

 

The June 1981 issue of the Mexican pop music magazine Sonido contained on pages 38 and 39 an article credited to “Vicco,” but which seems to be exactly the same kind of AFD/RSO-written publicity published in English in similar magazines a year before.

The article calls the film Times Square. It wasn’t released under that title in Mexico, though, as we shall see.

The accompanying photos are the ubiquitous TS-72-8A/14, TS-66-28/9, and TS-82-30[/4], all three of which were part of the US Press Material pack.

POR: vicco

TIMES SQUARE es un drama contemporáneo,con música estelarizada por los talentos de Tim Curry, cantante y actor británico que se dio a conocer con El show de terror de Rocky; Trini Alvarado, quien tuvo un importante papel en la película de Robert Altman Rich kids, y Robin Johnson, una actriz proveniente de Brooklin, muy dinámica y que canta también en su debut cinematográfico.

La película fue filmada en diversas locaciones de Nueva York, incluyendo el infame Deuce y es resaltada por veinte canciones originales ejemplificando algo de lo mejor del rock contemporáneo interpretadas por los más importantes artistas del momento, así como por las dos estrellas de la cinta, Robin Johnson y Trini Alvarado.

Times square retrata las desventuras de dos chiquillas rebeldonas, una proveniente de un ambiente sofisticado y, la otra, producto de las calles. Juntas desde el cuarto de un hospital neurológico comienzan una serie de bizarras escapadas y su comportamiento es reportado por un disc-jockey que trabaja toda la noche en una estación de radio y que las anima a seguir con sus trucos y logra convertirlas en celebridades menores de los medios. Ellas pasan sobre todas las autoridades llegando al climax en una escena sobre la marquesina del teatro Times Square con cientos de seguidores rindiendo su tributo.

Dicha cinta es una presentación de Robert Stigwood y fue producida por Stigwood y Jacob Brackman, dirigida por Alan Moyle, basada en una historia de Moyle y Leanne Unger. Kevin McCormick y John Nicollela son los productores ejecutivos y Bill Oakes es productor asociado.

LA MUSICA
En un momento en que la música de películas se encuentra entre los discos más populares y cuando ha sido entendida como un vehículo muy importante para la aceptación de una cinta, aparece un nuevo álbum doble en discos RSO con la música de la película Times square, uno de los más excitantes que han sido lanzados, pues no sólo captura el espíritu de la película, sino que es además una antología única de canciones interpretadas por los mejores artistas de rock del momento, tanto de Inglaterra como de Estados Unidos, incluyendo a Suzi Qautro, The Pretenders, Roxy Music, Gary Numan, The Talking Heads, Joe Jackson, The Patti Smith Group, XTC, The Cure, Lou Reed,The Ramones, The Ruts, David Johansen y muchos otros. ¡Es un álbum espectacular!

v

BY: vicco

TIMES SQUARE is a contemporary drama, with music, starring the talents of Tim Curry, singer and British actor who became known in The Rocky Horror Picture Show; Trini Alvarado, who had an important role in Robert Altman’s movie Rich Kids, and Robin Johnson, an actress from Brooklyn, very dynamic and who also sings in her film début.

The movie was filmed in diverse locations of New York, including the infamous Deuce, and it is highlighted by twenty original songs exemplifying some of the best contemporary rock performed by today’s most important artists, as well as by both stars of the film, Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado.

Times Square portrays the misfortunes of two little girl rebels, one from a sophisticated environment and, the other one, a product of the streets. Together from the room of a neurological hospital they begin a series of bizarre escapades and their behavior is reported by a disc-jockey who works the overnight on a radio station and who encourages them to continue with their tricks and manages to turn them into minor media celebrities. They get past all the authorities, arriving at the climax in a scene on the marquee of the Times Square theatre with hundreds of followers paying tribute.

This film is a Robert Stigwood presentation and it was produced by Stigwood and Jacob Brackman, directed by Alan Moyle, based on a story by Moyle and Leanne Unger. Kevin McCormick and John Nicollela are the executive producers and Bill Oakes is the associate producer.

THE MUSIC

At a time when movie soundtracks are among the most popular records and when they have been understood as a very important vehicle for the acceptance of a film, a new double album appears on RSO Records with the music of the movie Times Square, one of the most exciting to be released, since it not only captures the spirit of the movie, but it is also a unique collection of songs performed by today’s greatest rock artists, from both England and the United States, including Suzi Qautro, The Pretenders, Roxy Music, Gary Numan, The Talking Heads, Joe Jackson, The Patti Smith Group, XTC, The Cure, Lou Reed, The Ramones, The Ruts, David Johansen and many others. It is a spectacular album!

v

 

 

vicco, “Cine-rock : Times Square” (article), AAT ID: 300048715)
SONIDO la revista musical, No. 56, June 1981, pp. 38-39 (magazine (periodical), AAT ID: 300215389)
20.2 (W) x 27.8 cm. (H), 64 pp (work);
Sonido, La Revista Musical Ano 1 Numero 56 Junio 1981 – 0001_1080px.jpg (cover)
1080 px (H) x 823 px (W), 96 dpi, 501 kb
Sonido, La Revista Musical Ano 1 Numero 56 Junio 1981_0037_1080px.jpg (p. 38)
1080 px (H) x 794 px (W), 96 dpi, 439 kb
Sonido, La Revista Musical Ano 1 Numero 56 Junio 1981_0038_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 804 px (W), 96 dpi, 466 kb (images)
 
SONIDO la revista musical ©1981 Corporación Editorial, S.A.

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

UK Promo Photos 4, 13, and 21, 1980-81

Posted on 25th May 2018 in "Times Square"
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on RedditPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone

Typically, shortly before my last post was published (but weeks after I’d initially written it), five more stills from the UK series turned up. Two were duplicates of numbers 20 and 29, but the others were new to me. They follow the series’ general conventions of being black and white 8×10″s with no border, a handwritten number on a tiny square inset along the bottom edge, and a paper strip taped to the back with a typed caption.

This first one I’d been passing up for maybe nearly a year, since Robin isn’t in it and it’s essentially a duplicate of TS-117-13/15, although less cropped, but I picked it up along with these others when I realized it was might be part of this series.

 One of a series of black and white 8x10" photos distributed in the UK in 1981 to promote TIMES SQUARE (1980).  The caption taped to the back is likely the caption from a different photo in the series:  Robin Johnson is a runaway teenage product of the streets who dreams of becoming a rock music star and lets nothing get in her way to make it to the top in"TIMES SQUARE".  "TIMES SQUARE" a contemporary drama with music starring Tim Curry, Robin Johnson and Trini Alverado, is a Robert Stigwood Presentation, produced by Stigwood and Jacob Brackman and directed by Alan Moyle from Brackman's screenplay, based on the story by Moyle and Leanne Unger, with Kevin McCormick and John Nicollela the executive producers and Bill Oakes the associate producer. "TIMES SQUARE" is distributed by Columbia-EMI-Warner.

I have some doubts over whether it truly belongs in this series, though, first because the caption sheet taped to the back seems to belong to a different photo, and doesn’t have the photo number on it:

Robin Johnson is a runaway teenage product of the streets who dreams of becoming a rock music star and lets nothing get in her way to make it to the top in “TIMES SQUARE”.
“TIMES SQUARE” a contemporary drama with music starring Tim Curry, Robin Johnson and Trini Alverado, is a Robert Stigwood Presentation, produced by Stigwood and Jacob Brackman and directed by Alan Moyle from Brackman’s screenplay, based on the story by Moyle and Leanne Unger, with Kevin McCormick and John Nicollela the executive producers and Bill Oakes the associate producer. “TIMES SQUARE” is distributed by Columbia-EMI-Warner.

Robin’s not in the photo, Trini’s name is spelled wrong, and the film distributors’ names are separated by dashes instead of slashes. In fact, the caption is identical to the one on the caption sheet attached to this photo of Robin from the US Press Material folder, except for the typos and the addition of the UK film distributors. The strangest thing is, though, I already have a photo #4 from this series, and it’s of Tim Curry. Both these photos are unmistakably labeled “4”. I’m keeping them both until I find out if one or the other doesn’t belong. I suspect this is the one that should be categorized somewhere else.

The other two are definitely part of this series:

#13 appeared in Photoplay Vol 32 No 1, January 1981, and in the Japanese souvenir program book. A copy of this photo is probably the source of those images.

#29 looks to have been taken within seconds of a shot that appeared cropped in the center of Japanese program book and on a lobby card I don’t have (but Karen Dean [DefeatedandGifted] does), and this color shot. Like that last one, this photo as far as I know was never published and may be making its first public appearance here. It’s probably safe to say that any shot of the performance of “Damn Dog” in the Cleo Club, like the 35mm slide, was taken at the same run-through as this one. None of these shots are of the performance given for the take in the film, even allowing for a different placement of the still and movie cameras.

I promised in the last post, which went up twelve days before this one but was written two months before, that I’d post a collection of all the photos I have from this series once I had fifteen of them, and I now have sixteen, counting both number 4s. So, that will be the next post.

Previous posts referenced above:

Times Square Press Material folder (post 3 of 5)
Times Square Press Material folder (post 4 of 5)
Times Square UK Press Kit (post 2 of 4)
Photoplay Vol 32 No 1, January 1981
Times Square Program Book, Japan, June 1981 (post 1 of 5)
Times Square Program Book, Japan, June 1981, pages 12-13 (post 5 of 5)
“Damn Dog”
Aggie Doon

 

 

Times Square publicity still 4 [2nd version]
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347
UK ; 20.3 x 25.4 cm. (work)
Times_Square_UK_publicity_still_4_auto_1080px.jpg
864 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 368 kb (image)

Times Square publicity still 13
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347
UK ; 20.3 x 25.4 cm. (work)
Times_Square_UK_publicity_still_13_manual_1080px.jpg
864 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 423 kb (image)

Times Square publicity still 21
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347
UK ; 20.3 x 25.4 cm. (work)
Times_Square_UK_publicity_still_21_auto_1080px.jpg
866 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 432 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

UK Promo Photos 20 and 26, 1980-81

Posted on 13th May 2018 in "Times Square"
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on RedditPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone

Times Square 8 x 10″ publicity stills from this series continue to turn up. The first ones I found, I didn’t realize where they had come from, but the UK Press Kit’s caption sheet that matched up with some of the numbers on the photos solved the mystery. Their distinguishing characteristic is a small handwritten identification number in a tiny inset square along the bottom edge. Some have “TIMES SQUARE” stamped on the back. These have captions typed on a strip of paper pasted to their backs.

Photo 20 is the most-used publicity still from the movie, with the exceptions of the headshots of Trini and Robin that were used for the North American movie poster and the soundtrack album cover. I listed its various appearances when it showed up in Film Review Vol. 31 No. 1. Not in that list is photoplay Vol. 32 No. 4, where it also appeared, three months later. This specific version, numbered 20, was used as half of one of the two-photos-on-one-print 8×10’s that had Robert Stigwood’s name misspelled. It would make sense if the other three of those images were part of this series, especially since the caption for this one is identical on both versions, but I can’t see any numbers on the others.

Photo 26 is making its first and only (as far as I know at the moment) appearance here. It was part of the UK series of stills, but not used in any other country, and never published in any magazine or newspaper. (That I’ve yet found, at least.) It was evidently taken at the same time as the shot of Johnny and Pammy used on the Italian lobby poster, which will also later be a German lobby card.

The captions pasted to the photo backs both include the text “A scene from “TIMES SQUARE” distributed by COLUMBIA/EMI/WARNER Film Distributors”, Columbia/EMI/Warner being the film’s distributor in the UK.

The highest number photo in this series I’ve yet found is 36. I have thirteen of them. If I get an even 15 I’ll put up a gallery of just them. Till then, you can see them in these posts:

Times Square UK Press Kit (post 2 of 4)
Times Square UK Press Kit (post 3 of 4)
“6”
the page you’re reading right now
UK Promo Photo #29
“34”
Nicky Marotta, 1980

 

[In the two months that elapsed between my writing this page and my writing this note, shortly before this post is scheduled to be published, I did indeed acquire two more pictures from this series, plus one more that looks like it belongs but has the same number as another photo… so they will go up as soon as I can get them ready, followed by a post showing them all at once.]

 

 

Times Square publicity still 20
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347
UK ; 20.3 x 25.4 cm. (work)
Times_Square_UK_promo_photo_20_manual_2_1080px.jpg
866 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 397 kb (image)
Times_Square_UK_promo_photo_20_back_1080px.jpg
858 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 92.7 kb (image)

 
Times Square publicity still 26
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347
UK ; 20.3 x 25.4 cm. (work)
Times_Square_UK_promo_photo_26_auto_1080px.jpg
865 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 332 kb (image)
Times_Square_UK_promo_photo_26_back_1080px.jpg
855 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 108 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square Program Book, Japan, June 1981, pages 12-13 (post 5 of 5)

Posted on 7th April 2018 in "Times Square"
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on RedditPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone

1981 Japanese program book for TIMES SQUARE (1980), center spread (pp. 12-13)

The center two pages of the Japanese souvenir book feature, alongside a somewhat out of place Yankees logo, three beautifully reproduced photos.

The first, of Pammy and Nicky atop the Times Square Theater marquee, isn’t a frame from the film, and I haven’t yet found it as a publicity still, so it would seem to be making its first and possibly only appearance here.

The inset of Nicky singing in the Cleo Club looks like it was taken just before or after this publicity still (discussed here). This will turn up again later on the Mexican movie poster.

And the last shot: in the film we don’t see see Nicky’s face and the knife on her wrist in the same shot. This photo would seem to have been taken between AFD publicity still TS-109-16/12, which appeared in the US Press Material pack in 1980, and TS-81/34 from 1981, which I don’t have, but Karen Dean (DefeatedandGifted) does, along with several other Items I haven’t got. (Actually I’m fairly certain I do have a version of TS-81/34, but not as an AFD print, but consarn it I can’t seem to find it.)

This last shot would also seem to be making its first and only appearance, and isn’t it beautiful? I don’t know if it comes across in my digitization, but something about the lighting and quality of the printing make it look almost like a painting.

Incidentally, I just noticed that TS-C-34/29 in Karen’s collection is the same photo as the one that accompanied the film review in Playboy Vol. 28 No. 1 from January 1981, which until this moment I thought had only ever appeared there. Now I suspect that the “C” that appears in some of the AFD press photo code numbers means that there’s also a color version somewhere.

I also came across a photo I’d gotten several years ago and totally overlooked while preparing items for this blog. I think it’s a rejected publicity photo, the only one of three shots taken within seconds of each other not to see the light of day… until next time.

 

Times Square program book, pp. 12-13
Japan : souvenir program : AAT ID: 300253341 : 29.4 x 20.5 cm. : 1981 (work);

Press Book Japan 1981_12-13_1080px.jpg
1080 x 1486 px, 96 dpi, 762 kb (image)

©1980 Butterfly Valley N. V.
 
Times Square©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square Program Book, Japan, June 1981, pages 20-24 (post 4 of 5)

Posted on 26th March 2018 in "Times Square"
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on RedditPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone
“Let’s get together at … Hippy Power” (?)

1981 Japanese program book for TIMES SQUARE (1980), p. 21

 

 

 

Here at the end of the Japanese program book, we get the movie’s credits, an ad for the soundtrack album, and… the Times Square Top Ten? I can only imagine what’s being said, in relation to the film, about Make-Up, Music, Fashion, Life Style, Play, Foods, Dream, Sports, Sex, and Friendship. Okay, Music and Friendship I get, but Sports?

 

Page 21, bearing a “Hippy Power” button and the unfinished caption, “Let’s get together at,” features two shots that are neither frames from the film, nor are publicity stills I’ve yet come across. The shot atop the marquee bears a strong resemblance to this color still, and is probably another still shot at that same time, and the shot of the girls entering the abandoned pier is from an entirely different angle than the scene in the film. Also, neither Nicky nor especially Pammy smiles during that sequence in the film. The point being, this is the only place these pictures appear, as far I know.

 

 

I don’t know if the street photo that is the background of page 20 has anything to do the film, other than being New York City. The inset photo of Nicky is from the shot used on one of the Italian lobby posters. Accompanying the credits on page 22, the shot of Pammy and Nicky erupting onto the street after the chase through the Adonis Theater is I believe making its first appearance here; it will later be a press photo distributed in Germany. The other two photos are frames from the film but with more image visible at the tops and bottoms, which as I mentioned last time lead me to believe that these were taken from a full-frame exposure that was matted for release, and may still exist as a TV print.

Page 23 features the soundtrack album cover, the Japanese “Same Old Scene” single picture sleeve, and, clockwise from top right: a shot of Robin and Trini between takes that had previously appeared in Movie 81 No. 2; the image from the cover of the “Same Old Scene” single, which had also appeared in the soundtrack gatefold, the songbook, and the aforementioned Movie 81 No. 2; a shot of Johnny that had been a UK lobby card and an illustration in Movie 81 No.2; and guess where the shot of Robin had appeared previously? Of course! It was in Film Review Vol. 31 No. 1.

And that perfect image on the back cover is a detail from another publicity still that will appear later as a German lobby card.

 

 

Times Square program book, pp. 20-24
Japan : souvenir program : AAT ID: 300253341 : 29.4 x 20.5 cm. : 1981 (work);

Press Book Japan 1981_20_1080px.jpg
Press Book Japan 1981_21_1080px.jpg
Press Book Japan 1981_22_1080px.jpg
Press Book Japan 1981_23_1080px.jpg
Press Book Japan 1981_24_1080px.jpg
96 dpi (images)

©1980 Butterfly Valley N. V.
 
vlcsnap-2018-01-28-14h01m30s878_1080px.jpg
vlcsnap-2018-01-28-14h07m05s115_1080px.jpg
608 x 1080px, 96dpi (contrast-adjusted frame captures from Times Square (1980))
Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Another Italian Times Square Lobby Poster

Posted on 10th November 2017 in "Times Square"
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on RedditPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone

Two images from the film TIMES SQUARE (1980); ((1) Robin Johnson (2) Tim Curry and Trini Alvarado) with accompanying text:  TIMES SQUARE ROBERT STIGWOOD presenta "TIMES SQUARE"con TIM CURRY • TRINI ALVARADO  e per la prima volta sullo schermo ROBIN JOHNSON con PETER COFFIELD • HERBERT BERGHOF • DAVID MARGULIES  ANNA MARIA HORSFORD  produttori esecutivi KEVIN McCORMICK e JOHN NICOLELLA  diretto da ALAN MOYLE  prodotto da ROBERT STIGWOOD e JACOB BRACKMAN  sceneggiatura di JACOB BRACKMAN  soggetto di ALAN MOYLE e LEANNE UNGER EMI  produttore associato BILL OAKES  una produzione EMI-ITC  Technicolor • STEREOFUTURSOUND  IDIF

This is exactly what the post title says: a second lobby poster from Italy. There may be more, but so far I’ve only come across two.

The text is exactly the same as the other one and the Italian movie poster. Robin as Nicky is on the left, in a photo taken during the shooting of the final sequence, which is I believe making its first published appearance on this poster. We’ll be seeing it a few more times; it’s possible those future items actually came out before this, but they’re all from the spring or summer of 1981.

And on the right, we see an adult man giving vodka to a thirteen-year-old-girl, but it’s okay: he’s not interested in her, he wants to know about her sixteen-year-old roommate. Um… yeah. Sure, there’s really both more and less going on in that scene than that implies, but, I think you’d have a pretty hard time getting that from script to screen nowadays.

 

 

Times Square lobby poster (1)
poster, AAT ID: 300027221
Italy ; 46.9 x 64.5 cm. (work)
Times Square 1981 Italy Lobby Poster 1_1080px.jpg
783 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 427 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

U.K. Lobby Cards (post 2 of 3)

Posted on 17th November 2016 in "Times Square"
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on RedditPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone

Color 8"x10" lobby card, 1981  Text:  TIMES SQUARE AA Released by COLUMBIA - EMI - WARNER Distributors Limited. EMI A Member of the THORN EMI Group An EMI-ITC Production This copyright advertising material is licensed and not sold and is the property of National Screen Service Ltd. and upon completion of the exhibition for which it has been licensed it should be returned to National Screen Service Ltd. Printed in Great Britain.

 

This shot of Nicky joining in as Pammy dances at the Cleo Club appears to me to have been taken within seconds of TS-104-17A/7 from the US Press Materials folder, and this color 8×10, the purpose of which I still don’t know. (Its post is here.) Although the presence of Miguel Pinero and the various extras would seem to indicate all three were taken on the actual day of the shoot, they were shot either during a run-through or an unused take (or an unused portion of a used shot), as none of them match up to the action as shown in the film, even allowing for the different vantage points of the still and movie cameras.

 

Color 8"x10" lobby card, 1981 Text: TIMES SQUARE AA Released by COLUMBIA - EMI - WARNER Distributors Limited. EMI A Member of the THORN EMI Group An EMI-ITC Production This copyright advertising material is licensed and not sold and is the property of National Screen Service Ltd. and upon completion of the exhibition for which it has been licensed it should be returned to National Screen Service Ltd. Printed in Great Britain.

 

Another shot of Pammy and Nicky performing, or having just finished performing, “Your Daughter Is One” in the WJAD studio. It’s a shot we haven’t seen so far. The word “Rickenbacker” is clearly visible on the guitar’s headstock, so this photo belongs to the series of photographs from before it was removed (as it appears in the film) (yes, that’s from a different scene, but it’s the same guitar).

Color 8"x10" lobby card, 1981: Pammy and Nicky drop a television off the roof of a New York City building. Text: TIMES SQUARE AA Released by COLUMBIA - EMI - WARNER Distributors Limited. EMI A Member of the THORN EMI Group An EMI-ITC Production This copyright advertising material is licensed and not sold and is the property of National Screen Service Ltd. and upon completion of the exhibition for which it has been licensed it should be returned to National Screen Service Ltd. Printed in Great Britain.

Here Pammy and Nicky push their first television off a rooftop. A shot of them throwing their last one appeared in the songbook and inside the soundtrack album. In the film, Pammy doesn’t hold the box flap back, and Nicky is barely visible behind the box until after the TV is gone. Pammy and Nicky dropping their first television [Image 3 from the "Times Square" 2-sided poster] However, another shot that was obviously taken a split second after this one appeared way back as a tiny part of the collage that made up the double-sided promo poster. In that shot, the television is obviously on its way out of the box and down. Of course they didn’t really let the TV’s plummet to the street if it wasn’t shown happening in that shot), but it never occurred to me before now that not only did they catch them, they had to catch them completely intact right after they left the shot so they could be thrown off again in retakes. Either that, or part of the budget went for multiple identical junk television sets.

Pammy and Nicky throw their first television; frame from "Times Square" (1980)

 

 

[Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado as Nicky and Pammy in the Cleo Club]
[Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado as Nicky and Pammy in the WJAD studio]
[Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado as Nicky and Pammy drop a television]
Lobby cards (AAT ID: 300208593)
8 in (H) x 10 in. (W)
1981, Great Britain (works);

 

Times_Square_UK_Lobby_Card-4_manual_crop_1080px.jpg
1080 px (W) x 855 px (H), 96 dpi, 515 kb
Times_Square_UK_Lobby_Card-5_manual_crop_1080px.jpg
1080 px (W) x 855 px (H), 96 dpi, 592 kb
Times_Square_UK_Lobby_Card-6_manual_crop_1080px.jpg
1080 px (W) x 854 px (H), 96 dpi, 648 kb (images)

 

[Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado as Nicky and Pammy drop a television]
detail from [Double-sided promotional poster, outside] (image)
image 3 from 2-sided poster_800px.jpg
800 px (W) x 686 px (H), 96 dpi, 411 kb (image)

 

vlcsnap-2016-07-23-20h33m29s240.png
853 px (W) x 480 px (H), 72 dpi, 449 kb (image)
frame capture from Times Square (1980)
captured 2016-07-23

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Another 2-fer

Posted on 8th October 2016 in "Times Square"
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on RedditPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone
Two more UK black and white press photos on a single 8 x 10 print.

2 UK TIMES SQUARE B&W Press Photos on a single 8x10 print. The bottom photo is in the Press Kit, the top photo appears nowhere else as of this writing.  Captions:  A ROBERT STIGWARD PRESENTATION FOR EMI FILMS - TIMES SQUARE.  IN  A DISTRESSED CONDITION, NICKY (ROBIN JOHNSON) TRIES TO TELL HER STORY OVER THE AIR FROM THE RADIO STATION.  RELEASED IN THE UK BY COLUMBIA-EMI-WARNER.  A ROBERT STIGWARD PRESENTATION FOR EMI FILMS - TIMES SQUARE.  NICKY (ROBIN JOHNSON) AND PAMELA (TRINI ALVARADO) SURVEY THE CROWDS BELOW THEM IN TIMES SQUARE.  RELEASED IN THE UK BY COLUMBIA-EMI-WARNER.

Like the previous one of these, we have here one familiar picture and one new one.

 

The top photo, which  appears nowhere else as of this writing, from 2 UK TIMES SQUARE B&W Press Photos on a single 8x10 print.  Caption:  A ROBERT STIGWARD PRESENTATION FOR EMI FILMS - TIMES SQUARE.  IN  A DISTRESSED CONDITION, NICKY (ROBIN JOHNSON) TRIES TO TELL HER STORY OVER THE AIR FROM THE RADIO STATION.  RELEASED IN THE UK BY COLUMBIA-EMI-WARNER.

A ROBERT STIGWARD PRESENTATION FOR EMI FILMS – TIMES SQUARE. IN A DISTRESSED CONDITION, NICKY (ROBIN JOHNSON) TRIES TO TELL HER STORY OVER THE AIR FROM THE RADIO STATION. RELEASED IN THE UK BY COLUMBIA-EMI-WARNER.

 

At least I’ve never seen the top photo before, of Nicky waiting for her cue from Johnny to start her performance. Or perhaps it’s Robin waiting for her cue from Allan Moyle.

 

 

Bottom photo from 2 UK TIMES SQUARE B&W Press Photos on a single 8x10 print. The bottom photo is in the Press Kit.  Caption:  A ROBERT STIGWARD PRESENTATION FOR EMI FILMS - TIMES SQUARE.  NICKY (ROBIN JOHNSON) AND PAMELA (TRINI ALVARADO) SURVEY THE CROWDS BELOW THEM IN TIMES SQUARE.  RELEASED IN THE UK BY COLUMBIA-EMI-WARNER.

A ROBERT STIGWARD PRESENTATION FOR EMI FILMS – TIMES SQUARE. NICKY (ROBIN JOHNSON) AND PAMELA (TRINI ALVARADO) SURVEY THE CROWDS BELOW THEM IN TIMES SQUARE. RELEASED IN THE UK BY COLUMBIA-EMI-WARNER.

 

The bottom photo of Pammy looking on as Nicky decides whether to perform or not is a cropped version of TS-22-32 from the UK Press Kit (whose US-style numbering has me doubtful if it was really part of the Press Kit). Unfortunately it doesn’t have a nifty little UK-style number added like its counterpart on the other 2-fer.

Both captions repeat the peculiar misspelling of Robert Stigwood’s name as “Stigward”.

 

 

[2 “Times Square” black and white press photos on 1 8×10″ print 1 of 2]
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347, 7.75 in (W) x 10 in (H) (work);
1981 2-photo UK 8×10-1_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 863 px (W), 96 dpi, 312 kb (image)

1980
[IN A DISTRESSED CONDITION, NICKY (ROBIN JOHNSON) TRIES TO TELL HER STORY OVER THE AIR FROM THE RADIO STATION.]
[detail of 2 “Times Square” black and white press photos on 1 8×10″ print 1 of 2]
1981 2-photo UK 8×10-1_top_1080px.jpg
inscription:
[on photo] 20
[on border]A ROBERT STIGWARD PRESENTATION FOR EMI FILMS – TIMES SQUARE. IN A DISTRESSED CONDITION, NICKY (ROBIN JOHNSON) TRIES TO TELL HER STORY OVER THE AIR FROM THE RADIO STATION. RELEASED IN THE UK BY COLUMBIA-EMI-WARNER.
1080 px (W) x 950 px (H), 96 dpi, 404 kb (image)
[NICKY (ROBIN JOHNSON) AND PAMELA (TRINI ALVARADO) SURVEY THE CROWDS BELOW THEM IN TIMES SQUARE.]
[detail of 2 “Times Square” black and white press photos on 1 8×10″ print 1 of 2]
1981 2-photo UK 8×10-1_bottom_1080px.jpg
inscription:
[on border]
A ROBERT STIGWARD PRESENTATION FOR EMI FILMS – TIMES SQUARE. NICKY (ROBIN JOHNSON) AND PAMELA (TRINI ALVARADO) SURVEY THE CROWDS BELOW THEM IN TIMES SQUARE. RELEASED IN THE UK BY COLUMBIA-EMI-WARNER.
1080 px (W) x 943 px (H), 96 dpi, 406 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

“Nick & Slick”

Posted on 28th September 2016 in "Times Square"
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on RedditPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone
Two UK black and white press photos on a single 8 x 10 print.

2 UK TIMES SQUARE black and white press photos on a single 8x10 print.  The top photo is a version of TS-72-8A/14 from the US press kit, cropped to show less at the top and more at the left, right, and bottom.  It has a tiny number 20 at its lower right.  The bottom photo appears nowhere else as of this writing.  Text:  A ROBERT STIGWARD PRODUCTION FOR EMI FILMS - TIMES SQUARE.  PAMELA (TRINI ALVARADO) AND NICKY (ROBIN JOHNSON) SING LIVE ON THE AIR.  RELEASED IN THE UK BY COLUMBIA-EMI-WARNER.  A ROBERT STIGWARD PRODUCTION FOR EMI FILMS - TIMES SQUARE.  PAMELA (TRINI ALVARADO) AND NICKY (ROBIN JOHNSON) DEFACE PAMELA'S 'LOSTGIRL' POSTER.  RELEASED IN THE UK BY COLUMBIA-EMI-WARNER.

Who exactly printed these, and why, are mysteries, as I haven’t yet come across any publication that used them, but their country of origin is made clear by the captions announcing Times Square’s release in the UK.

A bigger mystery is why the photo captions lead off by misspelling Robert Stigwood’s surname “Stigward”. There’s at least one more 2-on-1 8×10 like this one (see next post), and it maintains the “Stigward” spelling.

 

 

This top photo from a single 8x10 print (2) contaniing 2 UK TIMES SQUARE Press Photos, is a version of TS-72-8A/14 from the US press kit, cropped to show less at the top and more at the left, right, and bottom.  It has a tiny number 20 at its lower right, in the style of the photos from the UK Press Kit.  Text:  A ROBERT STIGWARD PRODUCTION FOR EMI FILMS - TIMES SQUARE.  PAMELA (TRINI ALVARADO) AND NICKY (ROBIN JOHNSON) SING LIVE ON THE AIR.  RELEASED IN THE UK BY COLUMBIA-EMI-WARNER.

A ROBERT STIGWARD PRODUCTION FOR EMI FILMS – TIMES SQUARE. PAMELA (TRINI ALVARADO) AND NICKY (ROBIN JOHNSON) SING LIVE ON THE AIR. RELEASED IN THE UK BY COLUMBIA-EMI-WARNER.

The top photo is a version of TS-72-8A/14 from the US press kit, cropped to show less at the top and more at the left, right, and bottom. The most interesting thing about it it the tiny number 20 at its lower right, in the style of the photos from the UK Press Kit.

This bottom photo appears nowhere else as of this writing.  Text:  A ROBERT STIGWARD PRODUCTION FOR EMI FILMS - TIMES SQUARE.  PAMELA (TRINI ALVARADO) AND NICKY (ROBIN JOHNSON) DEFACE PAMELA'S 'LOSTGIRL' POSTER.  RELEASED IN THE UK BY COLUMBIA-EMI-WARNER.

A ROBERT STIGWARD PRODUCTION FOR EMI FILMS – TIMES SQUARE. PAMELA (TRINI ALVARADO) AND NICKY (ROBIN JOHNSON) DEFACE PAMELA’S ‘LOSTGIRL’ POSTER. RELEASED IN THE UK BY COLUMBIA-EMI-WARNER.

 

The bottom photo, as far as I know, has never appeared anywhere else. It comes from the end of the dancing-along-42nd-Street scene, when they find that someone has spray painted “No Sense Makes Sense – The Sleez Sisters” across a “Missing” poster of Pammy on the side of a city bus. Needless to say, the shot in the film is from a significantly different angle. Also, the scene cuts as Nicky is blacking out Pammy’s eyes, and here Pammy and Nicky admire her completed work, including Nicky’s addition of the legend “Nick & Slick”.

For what it’s worth, this moment is to me the biggest continuity error in the movie. In the film, only Pammy is around when Nicky utters the phrases “Sleez Sisters” and “No Sense Makes Sense”. In the script, there are indications that Johnny has had them in the WJAD studio several times broadcasting their philosophy to the tri-state area, but in the movie, local girls are apparently receiving psychic transmissions from Pier 56. It still works though, adding to the dream logic that underpins the entire movie. There’s no way this could have happened, but of course it did, because it has to. Yes, it makes no sense, but No Sense Makes Sense. It’s pointless to argue about logic flaws in Times Square, because logic isn’t the point, the point is raw emotion, as embodied in Nicky Marotta.

That the incoherent form of the film reflects the intent in this way is a complete accident; I’m certain Allan Moyle and Jacob Brackman weren’t trying to create a film that delivered its message through continuity problems. Moyle has said (in the Anchor Bay DVD commentary) that the script should have had another year’s development before filming, to iron out some of those problems; and if someone other than Robert Stigwood had produced it, the problems created after Moyle left the film wouldn’t have occurred. As I’ve said before, though, if this had happened, Times Square would have been a radically different movie, and wouldn’t have starred Robin Johnson, and I wouldn’t be here blathering on about it.

Now, “No Sense Makes Sense” having its origins as a Charles Manson quote, again betraying the late ’60s-early ’70s sensibilities of the film’s creators, and our heroines adopting it as a rallying cry, and myself using it to explain away the movie’s structural flaws… well, it makes me feel a little icky, but please somebody else discuss this in the comments. I’m really only here to show all the pictures I’ve collected, not to analyze the film. (Every once in a while I just can’t help myself though, as you can see.)

 

 

[2 “Times Square” black and white press photos on 1 8×10″ print 2 of 2]
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347, 7.75 in (W) x 10 in (H) (work);
1981 UK 2-photo 8×10-3_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 852 px (W), 96 dpi, 321 kb (image)

1980
[20 – PAMELA (TRINI ALVARADO) AND NICKY (ROBIN JOHNSON) SING LIVE ON THE AIR.]
[detail of 2 “Times Square” black and white press photos on 1 8×10″ print 2 of 2]
1981 UK 2-photo 8×10-3_top_1080px.jpg
inscription:
[on photo] 20
[on border]A ROBERT STIGWARD PRODUCTION FOR EMI FILMS – TIMES SQUARE. PAMELA (TRINI ALVARADO) AND NICKY (ROBIN JOHNSON) SING LIVE ON THE AIR. RELEASED IN THE UK BY COLUMBIA-EMI-WARNER.
1080 px (W) x 911 px (H), 96 dpi, 358 kb (image)
[PAMELA (TRINI ALVARADO) AND NICKY (ROBIN JOHNSON) DEFACE PAMELA’S ‘LOSTGIRL’ POSTER.]
[detail of 2 “Times Square” black and white press photos on 1 8×10″ print 2 of 2]
1981 UK 2-photo 8×10-3_bottom_1080px.jpg
inscription:
[on border]A ROBERT STIGWARD PRODUCTION FOR EMI FILMS – TIMES SQUARE. PAMELA (TRINI ALVARADO) AND NICKY (ROBIN JOHNSON) DEFACE PAMELA’S ‘LOSTGIRL’ POSTER. RELEASED IN THE UK BY COLUMBIA-EMI-WARNER.
1080 px (W) x 921 px (H), 96 dpi, 391 kb (image)

 

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square UK Press Kit (post 3 of 4)

Posted on 9th August 2016 in "Times Square"
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on RedditPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone

First, some pictures.

Tim Curry as Johnny LaGuardia on the roof outside the WJAD studio, in the UK press kit photograph numbered 5.  This photo was taken a second before or after the photo numbered TS-79-28/8 in the US press kit.  The text from the press kit's photo captions page:  5. TIM CURRY stars as an all-night disc jockey, who, perched in his studio high above Times Square follows and encourages the progress of the runaway girls, who thanks to his efforts become minor media celebrities.

5. TIM CURRY stars as an all-night disc jockey, who, perched in his studio high above Times Square follows and encourages the progress of the runaway girls, who thanks to his efforts become minor media celebrities.

 

 

UK Press Kit photo #5 is another headshot of Tim Curry, this time as Johnny appears at the end of the film as he’s watching the concert though his telescope on the deck outside WJAD. The most interesting thing about this photo is, at first glance it looks like TS-79-28/8 from the US press kit, but it isn’t. It’s not just cropped differently; Tim’s head is tilted up slightly and he hasn’t got the beginnings of a smile he sports in the US photo. It’s a different photo, taken just before or just after.

Photos 6, 7, and 8 are pictures of Robin. Unfortunately I don’t have Photo 6, and none of the photos without the little number are of Robin alone.

Robin Johnson as Nicky Marotta atop the Times Square Theater marquee, in the UK press kit photograph numbered 7. The text from the press kit's photo captions page: 6/7/8. 15-year-old screen newcomer ROBIN JOHNSON stars as Nicky Marotta, a street-wise young runaway who, thanks to a radio DJ's patronage, is able to fulfil her fantasies of becoming a star of the "new wave".

6/7/8. 15-year-old screen newcomer ROBIN JOHNSON stars as Nicky Marotta, a street-wise young runaway who, thanks to a radio DJ’s patronage, is able to fulfil her fantasies of becoming a star of the “new wave”.


In Photo 7, Nicky kneels at the edge of the Times Square Theater marquee, deciding if she wants to perform or not. She never looks up in the film like she’s doing here, though, not without turning to look at Pammy or the Blondells. Perhaps she’s waiting here for a cue from Allan Moyle.
Robin Johnson as Nicky Marotta in the Cleo Club, in the UK press kit photograph numbered 8. The text from the press kit's photo captions page: 6/7/8. 15-year-old screen newcomer ROBIN JOHNSON stars as Nicky Marotta, a street-wise young runaway who, thanks to a radio DJ's patronage, is able to fulfil her fantasies of becoming a star of the "new wave".

6/7/8. 15-year-old screen newcomer ROBIN JOHNSON stars as Nicky Marotta, a street-wise young runaway who, thanks to a radio DJ’s patronage, is able to fulfil her fantasies of becoming a star of the “new wave”.

 

Photo 8 has Nicky scoping out the Cleo Club for Pammy, before revealing her attempt at poetry to her. This one is really close to the shot as it appears in the film, but it isn’t. The POV is slightly to the left of the movie camera, and although Robin is doing the same nervous finger-pulling, her hands are never in that exact position. This is the same almost-but-not-quite situation we saw with the shots of Trini from the later scene in the club where Mr. Pearl confronts Pammy.

I don’t have any photos numbered 9 or 10, and the caption sheet has no entries for them.

Trini Alvarado as Pamela Pearl, in the UK press kit photograph numbered 11. The text from the press kit's photo captions page: 11. TRINI ALVARADO, 12-year-old star of Robert Altman's RICH KIDS, is Pamela Pearl, daughter of a well-to-do New York family who runs away to find a new and exciting life in the city’s streets.

11. TRINI ALVARADO, 12-year-old star of Robert Altman’s RICH KIDS, is Pamela Pearl, daughter of a well-to-do New York family who runs away to find a new and exciting life in the city’s streets.

 

 

Photo 11 is a shot of Trini from the end of the same scene in the Cleo Club as Photo 8. In the film she never looks in thIS direction while smiling. Also, this photo has been lit in such a way as to make the background disappear entirely. The photographer took the opportunity to make this a true glamor portrait, not just an on-set publicity still. The glass on the table by her elbow shows that it was taken on the set, though.

Most of the photos in the UK Press Kit are very grainy and dusty compared to the US photos, as if they were printed from copies themselves. I’ve cleaned up the dust and scratches that were on the physical copy of the prints, but I’ve left most of the ones that were in the print itself, except the ones that were so huge I couldn’t stand to leave them.

There are two sets of text pages, and two profiles of Robin in each. The longer profile is almost the same as the one from the US press kit. Almost… but not quite. Aside from the slight rewording of nearly every sentence, this UK version spells Allan Moyle’s name correctly, where the US press kit and the film itself spell it “Alan”. The UK version describes Robin’s “discovery” on the steps of Brooklyn Tech in 1979 when she was 15 (which is accurate), and the US version has it happening in 1980 and gives her age as 16. I’m starting to wonder if the UK Press Kit wasn’t made up first, and the US version derived from it. (The photo captions also state Robin’s age as 15, which she was during the making of the film; she was 16 during its marketing.)

The only difference between the two sets in the UK Press Kit is that the text on the pages without the Times Square letterhead contain American spellings of words, and the pages with Times Square letterhead contain British spellings (“centers”/”centres”, etc.).

“TIMES SQUARE” STAR ROBIN JOHNSON IS A NATURAL

One day Brooklyn’s Technological High School’s front steps may be legendary as the spot where a star was “born”, a ’79 equivalent to Hollywood’s Schwab’s Drug Store, On those steps, smoking a cigarette while waiting for classes to begin, 15 —year—old ROBIN JOHNSON was discovered by a casting scout on the lookout for possible candidates for the lead in TIMES SQUARE.

“He gave me this card and said to call this number if I was interested in being in a movie,” Robin recalls in her inimitible Brooklyn-accented speech. “I thought ‘Oh! Another wise guy’, but gave it a try.”

What Robin didn’t know at the time was that director Allan Moyle, who had written the original story for TIMES SQUARE with Leanne Unger, was determined to cast only the young actress who would be precisely right for the crucial central role of Nicky Marotta, a gusty teenager, loose and without adult super- vision and determined to be a rock star.

The talent search had already bypassed many of the traditional avenues and gone to youth centres, punk clubs, and placed ads in papers like the Village Voice, Soho News, Aquarian. “We were looking for someone who WAS Nicky,” Moyle admits. “Robin’s definitely not that doomed child. Luckily for the picture, Robin’s brought a lot more humour to the character than I had originally envisioned.”

Without any previous experience – “I had sung in a choir when I was 12” – Robin won the role over literally thousands of other candidates. After being cast, she entered an intensive programme of coaching in singing and dance/movement. Making the film meant that the novice was quickly transformed into a seasoned professional. Robin worked seven days a week for three months, for as a minor, the new star had to continue her studies with a tutor on the set and more lessons on Saturday. On Sunday, recording or dancing demands would take up the day. The veteran members of the New York crew were impressed with the professionalism of both Robin and her even younger co-star, 13-year-old TRINI ALVARADO. Both exhibited an almost non-stop flow of dedication, energy, high spirits and raucous good humour.

Robin lives with her older sister Cindy and her mother, in- Brooklyn. Born on May 29th, 1964, Robin never gave any thought to becoming an actress until TIMES SQUARE.

Her inclination previously ran toward sketching (I’m not into landscapes; give me cartoons with some people in there “) and, whenever the opportunity arose, banging on drums. And although she first started dating when she was 11, she’s not worried about permanent relationships at this point in her life. “I’m closest with my sister Cindy, who’s a year older. We’re both Geminis and I like to argue, especially in a friendly way.”

Like many young women her age, Robin can identify with Nicky’s rebelliousness and non-conformity, traits which land Nicky in trouble with the law and into the arms of Rosie (ANNA MARIE HORSFORD), a concerned social worker. “Nicky can’t put things over on Rosie like she does with others,” Robin figures, “and that’s the reason she admires her. I have trouble with authority figures, too, which means anybody with the upper hand – like my mother or my teachers.” But for director Allan Moyle, who might be considered the supreme authority figure, Robin has only praise: “We’re alike in certain ways and that made it easier to relate. Allan’s absolutely brilliant for inspiration, for giving you energy for a scene. When he wants you to do a scene better, he gets you to think, not bullying or intimidating, I want to work with him again.”

Robin sees Nicky as a teenager who masks what she really feels and tried to make her real, “She was bitter about being abandoned. Her Dad’s a loser. All she can do is pity him, not be mad at him now. Nicky has a lot of gutsiness that I really admired. Her philosophy always was, ‘When you’re mad, show it’.”

Gutsiness is a trait Robin and Nicky have in common. Robin, besides being bright, witty and talented, is seemingly fearless, whether performing atop a 42nd Street theatre marquee or being dunked into the icy December water of the polluted Hudson River. “Nerves don’t get you anywhere,” she says.

Robin was coached for TIMES SQUARE by veteran Sue Seaton, who has worked with Katharine Hepburn and Gilda Radner, But that throaty timbre is unmistakably her own, perhaps a result of the ”Kool” cigarettes she smokes incessantly.

The closest Robin had ever been to a movie set before TIMES SQUARE was when a scene for “The Wanderers” was shot in her neighbourhood. Now, the world of movies is opening for her.

“Let me tell you about this movie business,” she says seriously. “There’s no right for anyone to get an attitude just because so many people are aware of your job. What I say is, it’s entertainment and it’s a job. I hope TIMES SQUARE does well, but it’s not the answer to my life. Most, I loved meeting and working with so many wonderful people.”

There is one confession she’ll make when prodded about the rigors of working in the realm of make-believe: “Oh yeah,” she says with a grimace, “chewing roses was pretty disgusting. I’d never tasted flowers before.”

Two things of interest, both in the credits as listed in the letterhead: first, the order of the cast. The film’s credits are “Starring TIM CURRY, TRINI ALVARADO, and introducing ROBIN JOHNSON as Nicky.” This letterhead’s credits read “Starring ROBIN JOHNSON, TRINI ALVARADO and TIM CURRY.” So, for a brief moment, Robin had top billing.

Second, I just noticed… all the promotional materials, as well as the film itself, misspell Leanne Ungar’s name “Unger”. Of course, in Moyle’s earlier film The Rubber Gun (1977), she had a music engineering credit that spelled her name “Lianne Ungen,” so I suppose this was a step up.

 

 

TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_5
1080 px (W) x 864 px (H), 96 dpi, 263 kb (image)
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_7
1080 px (W) x 864 px (H), 96 dpi, 260 kb (image)
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_8
1080 px (W) x 865 px (H), 96 dpi, 282 kb (image)
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_11
1080 px (W) x 865 px (H), 96 dpi, 245 kb (image)
black and white photographic prints, 8 in (H) x 10 in (W) (works);

1980
inscriptions: [on photos] 5; 7; 8; 11;
[on reverse] TIMES SQUARE

 

“TIMES SQUARE” STAR ROBIN JOHNSON IS A NATURAL, pp. 1-4
8.5 in (W) x 11 in (H) (works);
1080 px (H) x 832 px (W), 96 dpi, 238 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 832 px (W), 96 dpi, 200 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 832 px (W), 96 dpi, 233 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 832 px (W), 96 dpi, 115 kb (image)

 

“TIMES SQUARE” STAR ROBIN JOHNSON IS A NATURAL, pp. 1-3
8.27 in (W) x 11.69 in (H) (works);
1080 px (H) x 755 px (W), 96 dpi, 283 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 755 px (W), 96 dpi, 262 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 755 px (W), 96 dpi, 254 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+