Times Square lobby cards, Germany, 1982 (post 5 of 5)

Posted on 6th May 2019 in "Times Square"
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The last three German lobby cards.

 

Number 13 looks over Nicky’s shoulder down to the sparse crowd on 42nd Street. This shot occurs as the crowd is assembling when they first spot her, though; it grows to at least five times this size. Still not enough to fill the street, but bigger than what we see here. To the right is a Sleez Girl holding a sign reading “Na Na Na,” which was not shown in the film because it refers to a song that was Nicky’s favorite in the script, that was completely written out of the story during shooting. Evidently it was still in the script when the final concert was shot, but by the time they were done shooting it had become a callback reference to events that never occurred. There’s a better look at it in a photo published in the songbook and the inside of the British edition of the soundtrack, which also implies that “Ooga booga booga” was actually a catchphrase Johnny used on the radio. In the May 1979 version of the script, Johnny only says it once, although it’s during the “Your Daughter Is One” scene (the film replaced it with “Piss off”), not during the fight with Mr. Pearl. If it was said over the air, it was added after this script, and then removed again during shooting. A continuity error just like this that still appears in the film is “No Sense Makes Sense” on the side of the bus, and on the signs in the crowd, despite nobody but Pammy ever hearing Nicky say it.

The “Nicky for Borough President” sign barely appears in the film, but it absolutely should have had a close-up. In fact, it should have been what the girls used to catch Nicky when she jumped, then we wouldn’t have “Where did they get the quilt from so fast?” in our list of things about Times Square that make no sense if you stop to think about them.

 

Number 14 is the view from street level, which makes the crowd more convincing. It seems to have been a special for the German market, having only previously appeared in Bravo No. 21 and Cinema Vol. 49 No. 6. [Wait — between the time I wrote that and the time this was posted, I found out I’m wrong about that. Another previous appearance of this image is coming up…]

 

 

 

 

 

 

And finally, number 15 is the card that only appeared in the second set of these I found, appearing in place of number 3. Is Nicky pleading for her last, one more thing to say, or is she still singing her guts out? It’s hard to tell from this picture, which to my knowledge never appeared anywhere else.

 

So there you have it, 15 lobby cards from Germany. Which leads me to believe now that there’s one more out there… I have reason to suspect that lobby cards are printed in sheets of four and them cut apart, which would explain why there are eight British lobby cards, and why… well, a few things I’ve only just stumbled across which will be coming up in the next few weeks. Yeah, I’m running out of Times Square items to share… but not just yet.

 

 

 

[TIMES SQUARE …ihr könnt uns alle ’mal!! German lobby cards 13-15 of 15]
Germany : lobby cards : AAT ID: 300208593 : 24 x 30 cm. : 1982 (works);
Times_Square_German_Lobby_Cards_1982_1_13_1080.jpg
858 x 1080 px, 96 dpi, 531 kb
Times_Square_German_Lobby_Cards_1982_1_14_1080.jpg
857 x 1080 px, 96 dpi, 522 kb
Times_Square_German_lobby_cards_1982_2_15_1080px.jpg
861 x 1080 px, 96 dpi, 495 kb (images)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square lobby cards, Germany, 1982 (post 4 of 5)

Posted on 23rd April 2019 in "Times Square"
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Yet another three German lobby cards.

 

 

 

The first, number 10 by my count, was a UK lobby card, and had been previously published in Film Review Vol. 31 No. 1 and Movie 81 No. 2, and on the back of the Japanese promo flyer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The photo on number 11 had previously appeared on an Italian lobby poster.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And number 12 had seen publication, cropped and reversed, in the Japanese souvenir program book.

 

 

 

[TIMES SQUARE …ihr könnt uns alle ’mal!! German lobby cards 10-12 of 15]
Germany : lobby cards : AAT ID: 300208593 : 24 x 30 cm. : 1982 (works);
Times_Square_German_Lobby_Cards_1982_1_10_1080.jpg
857 x 1080 px, 96 dpi, 556 kb
Times_Square_German_Lobby_Cards_1982_1_11_1080.jpg
858 x 1080 px, 96 dpi, 524 kb
Times_Square_German_Lobby_Cards_1982_1_12_1080.jpg
858 x 1080 px, 96 dpi, 416 kb (images)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square lobby cards, Germany, 1982 (post 3 of 5)

Posted on 10th April 2019 in "Times Square"
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Another three German lobby cards.

 

 

 

 

The image on card #7 previously appeared in Joepie #365.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nicky rising from her seat to dance with Pammy as Roberto looks on was previously a British lobby card, and a cropped version appeared on the back of the Japanese promo flyer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And card #9 (remember, I’ve assigned these numbers, they’re not in any way official) was the centerpiece of the Japanese movie poster, and also appeared on the cover of the Japanese souvenir program book; on the inside of the AFD press folder; on the picture sleeve of the Japanese “Same Old Scene” single; in the gatefold of the soundtrack album and in the songbook; and in Movie 81 No. 2 in February 1981.

 

 

 

[TIMES SQUARE …ihr könnt uns alle ’mal!! German lobby cards 7-9 of 15]
Germany : lobby cards : AAT ID: 300208593 : 24 x 30 cm. : 1982 (works);
Times_Square_German_Lobby_Cards_1982_1_07_1080.jpg
857 x 1080 px, 96 dpi, 496 kb
Times_Square_German_Lobby_Cards_1982_1_08_1080.jpg
857 x 1080 px, 96 dpi, 414 kb
Times_Square_German_Lobby_Cards_1982_1_09_1080.jpg
857 x 1080 px, 96 dpi, 434 kb (images)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square lobby cards, Germany, 1982 (post 2 of 5)

Posted on 28th March 2019 in "Times Square"
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Three more German lobby cards.

 

The shot of Johnny at the mic was previously a British lobby card, and had been published in Movie 81 No. 2 in February 1981. It would appear to have been taken at the same time as the shot that appeared in the center of the gatefold of the soundtrack album (except in the UK), and the earliest published photo of Tim Curry from Times Square (in The Aquarian, April 23, 1980), which was also #4 of the seemingly unending series of UK black and white publicity stills.

It’s also the card that was missing from the second set of these cards I found, replaced by a card not in the first set.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This shot of the girls walking west along 42nd Street towards Times Square, with 6th Avenue behind them, was used in 1981 as a British lobby card. It also appeared in Belgium’s Joepie No. 365, on the Japanese movie poster (Pammy’s face only), and in the first promotional piece sent out by RSO.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And a cropped version of this photo of Nicky and Pammy entering the Pier 56 hideout previously appeared in the Japanese souvenir program book.

 

[TIMES SQUARE …ihr könnt uns alle ’mal!! German lobby cards 4-6 of 15]
Germany : lobby cards : AAT ID: 300208593 : 24 x 30 cm. : 1982 (works);
Times_Square_German_Lobby_Cards_1982_1_04_1080.jpg
857 x 1080 px, 96 dpi, 397 kb
Times_Square_German_Lobby_Cards_1982_1_05_1080.jpg
857 x 1080 px, 96 dpi, 514 kb
Times_Square_German_Lobby_Cards_1982_1_06_1080.jpg
857 x 1080 px, 96 dpi, 353 kb (images)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square lobby cards, Germany, 1982 (post 1 of 5)

Posted on 15th March 2019 in "Times Square"
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Germany may have gotten Times Square last, but they got a set of 15 lobby cards to promote it with. At least, 15 that I’ve found, over several years, in two batches of 14 that each had one different card in them. While 15 sounds like a nice round number, I wouldn’t be surprised if more turn up sometime.

Here are the first three:


 

 

 

They’re not actually numbered, so I’ve put them in an order that makes sense to me.

These three distinguish themselves by all being a rarity in Times Square publicity: a photo of the actor, on set and in costume, looking directly into the camera. The first is familiar, the photo by Yoram Kahana that was taken at the same time as the shot which became the image on the soundtrack album cover and the North American movie poster, and which was at some point distributed as a slide (one of which is owned by DefeatedandGifted), and printed in Movie 81 No 2, as an inset on the Japanese movie poster, and in Filmstar Vol. 1 No. 6.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The shot of Trini made its only previous appearance, as far as I know, on a British lobby card.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But this shot of Tim Curry as Johnny, lounging in the WJAD control room, only ever appeared on this card.

Would you like to know more?

Nicky Marotta, 1980
Times Square Press Material folder (post 1 of 5)
The Original Motion Picture Soundtrack “TIMES SQUARE”
Movie 81 No. 2, February 1981
Times Square movie poster, Japan, June 1981
Filmstar, Vol. 1 No. 6, Thailand, October 1981
U.K. Lobby Cards (post 1 of 3)

 

 

[TIMES SQUARE …ihr könnt uns alle ’mal!! German lobby cards 1-3 of 15]
Germany : lobby cards : AAT ID: 300208593 : 24 x 30 cm. : 1982 (works);
Times_Square_German_Lobby_Cards_1982_1_01_1080.jpg
1080 x 866 px, 96 dpi, 574 kb
Times_Square_German_Lobby_Cards_1982_1_02_1080.jpg
857 x 1080 px, 96 dpi, 430 kb
Times_Square_German_Lobby_Cards_1982_1_03_1080.jpg
856 x 1080 px, 96 dpi, 456 kb (images)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square movie poster, Germany, 1982

Posted on 2nd March 2019 in "Times Square"
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1982 German movie poster for TIMES SQUARE (1980).  Text:  ROBERT STIGWOOD Presents "TIME SQUARE"  Starring TIM CURRY • TRINI ALVARADO • ROBIN  JOHNSON • PETER COFFIELD • HERBERT  BERGHOF • DAVID MARGULIES • ANNA MARIA  HORSFORD  Executive Producers KEVIN McCORMICK  JOHN NICOLELLA • Directed by ALAN MOYLE  Produced by ROBERT STIGWOOD and JACOB  BRACKMAN • Screenplay by JACOB BRACKMAN  Story by ALAN MOYLE and LEANNE UNGER  Associate Producer BILL OAKES  An EMI-ITC Production  Soundtrack erschienen auf dem RSO-Label bei der  DEUTSCHEN GRAMMOPHON GmbH  mit Superstar TIM CURRY ("ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW")  mit TRINI ALVARADO  und ROBIN JOHNSON  Nach "SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER”, ”GREASE”, "JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR” und "TOMMY”  präsentiert ROBERT STIGWOOD jetzt den frechsten und fetzigsten Film über die Teenies auf der wildesten Meile von New York!  TIMES SQUARE ...ihr könnt uns alle ’mal!!  schröder-filmverleih  DOLBY STEREO    FSK FREIGEGEBEN  [Translation:]  Soundtrack from RSO appears on DEUTSCHEN GRAMMOPHON GmbH  with superstar TIM CURRY  ("ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW")  with TRINI ALVARADO and ROBIN JOHNSON  After "SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER", "GREASE", "JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR" and "TOMMY" ROBERT STIGWOOD now presents the sassiest and craziest movie about teens on the wildest mile of New York!  TIMES SQUARE ... you can all [kiss our asses]!  schröder-film distributors  DOLBY STEREO    FSK RELEASED

Times Square opened in West Germany on May 21, 1982. The poster reproduced the painting by Cummins that had graced the other European posters, although with a different pair of photos than the British, Spanish, and Yugoslavian posters, and the addition of a paragraph of ad copy that seems to take its cue from the Belgian poster.

ROBERT STIGWOOD Presents “TIME SQUARE”
Starring TIM CURRY • TRINI ALVARADO • ROBIN
JOHNSON • PETER COFFIELD • HERBERT
BERGHOF • DAVID MARGULIES • ANNA MARIA
HORSFORD

Executive Producers KEVIN McCORMICK
JOHN NICOLELLA • Directed by ALAN MOYLE
Produced by ROBERT STIGWOOD and JACOB
BRACKMAN • Screenplay by JACOB BRACKMAN
Story by ALAN MOYLE and LEANNE UNGER
Associate Producer BILL OAKES
An EMI-ITC Production

Soundtrack erschienen auf dem RSO-Label bei der
DEUTSCHEN GRAMMOPHON GmbH

mit Superstar TIM CURRY
(“ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW”)

mit TRINI ALVARADO
und ROBIN JOHNSON

Nach “SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER”, ”GREASE”, “JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR” und “TOMMY”
präsentiert ROBERT STIGWOOD jetzt den frechsten und fetzigsten Film über die Teenies
auf der wildesten Meile von New York!

TIMES SQUARE
…ihr könnt uns alle ’mal!!

schröder-filmverleih

DOLBY STEREO FSK FREIGEGEBEN

 

Soundtrack from RSO appears on DEUTSCHEN GRAMMOPHON GmbH

with superstar TIM CURRY
(“ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW”)

with TRINI ALVARADO
and ROBIN JOHNSON

After “SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER”, “GREASE”, “JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR” and “TOMMY”
ROBERT STIGWOOD now presents the sassiest and craziest movie about teens
on the wildest mile of New York!

TIMES SQUARE
… you can all [kiss our asses]!

schröder-film distributors

DOLBY STEREO FSK RELEASED

The other European posters:

Times Square U.K. Movie Poster
Times Square Movie Poster, Belgium
Locandina Times Square (Movie Poster, Italy)
Tajms SkverTimes Square Movie Poster, Yugoslavia, 1981
“Toda la Basca!” … a Times Square – Times Square movie poster, Spain

 

 

Times Square …ihr könnt uns alle ’mal!!
Germany : poster : AAT ID: 300027221 : 84 x 60 cm. : 1982 (work);
Times_Square_movie_poster_Germany_1982_1080px.jpg
1080 x 762 px, 96 dpi, 475 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Bravo, No. 21, Germany, May 19, 1982

Posted on 9th January 2019 in "Times Square"
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Bravo No. 21, May 19, 1982, German pop culture magazine
Article promoting TIMES SQUARE in Bravo No. 21, May 19, 1982, a German pop culture magazine. Text: Jetzt im Kino: TIMES SQUARE IHR KONNT UNS ALLE MAL Ein irrer Film mit heißer Musik über die ausgeflipptesten Teenager von New York Die 16jährige Nicky Marotta (Robin Johnson) und die 13jährige Pamela Pearl (Trini Alvarado) liegen zusammen im Zimmer eines New Yorker Krankenhauses. Beide sollen auf ihren Geisteszustand untersucht werden. Nicky, weil sie eine notorische Streunerin ist; Pamela, weil ihr Vater, ein ehrgeiziger Politiker, mit ihr nicht mehr klarkommt. Eines Tages überredet Nicky Pamela zur Flucht. Im Nachthemd entwischen sie aus dem Krankenhaus, schnappen sich einen Krankenwagen und brausen los. In einem alten Schuppen am Times Square, einem der berühmtesten und berüchtigtsten Plätze New Yorks, finden sie Unterschlupf. So beginnt der Film „Times Square“ (in Deutschland hat er noch den Untertitel „Ihr könnt uns alle mal“). Die beiden Mädchen finden ihr „freies“ Leben herrlich. Sie tragen die ausgefallensten Klamotten, hören pausenlos heiße Musik und jobben abends in einer Kneipe. Nicky, die gut Gitarre spielt, singt mit einer Band,| Pamela arbeitet als Go-go-Girl. Natürlich hat Pamelas Vater alle Hebel in Bewegung gesetzt, um seine Tochter zu finden. In den Fall hat sich auch der beliebte Discjockey Johnny LaGuardian (Tim Curry, der Dr. Frank N. Furter aus der „Rocky Horror Picture Show“) eingeschaltet. Er ist so eine Art Thomas Gottschalk. Ihm vertrauen die Teens, wenn er täglich am Mikrofon zu ihnen spricht. Johnny findet die beiden und verspricht, ihnen zu helfen. So dürfen die Mädchen ein von Nicky komponiertes Lied über den Sender singen. Die jugendlichen Hörer sind begeistert. Johnny erzählt ihnen die Geschichte der beiden Ausreißerinnen. Nicky und Pamela werden auf ihre Art zu „Heldinnen“. Einer der Höhepunkte des Films ist die Aufforderung von Nicky und Pamela, dem Götzen „Fernsehen“ abzuschwören. Und Hunderte machen mit: Zum Entsetzen der Eltern werfen die Teenager die Fernseh-Apparate einfach auf die Straße. Doch die beiden Mädchen sehen bald ein, daß ihr Leben so nicht mehr weiterlaufen kann. Und wieder erweist sich der Discjockey Johnny als Retter. Er organisiert für Nicky ein Konzert auf dem Dach eines Kinos. Aus allen Richtungen New Yorks strömen die Kids in gleicher Aufmachung wie Nicky und Pamela zum Times Square. Das Konzert, obwohl von der Polizei nicht genehmigt, wird ein Riesenerfolg. Nicky ist ihrem Traum, ein Rock- Star zu werden, nähergekommen. Pamela kehrt zu ihrem Vater, der eingesehen hat, daß auch er viele Fehler gemacht hat, zurück. Die beiden Hauptdarstellerinnen sind Neulinge. Nicky (Robin Johnson) wurde von der Schule weg engagiert, Pamela (Trini Alvarado) drehte bereits einen Film. Toll natürlich Tim Curry. Die Musik stammt unter anderem von Suzi Quatro, Pretenders, Roxy Music, Gary Numan, XTC, Ramones und Robin Gibb von den Bee Gees. Text: Peter Raschner Auf dem Dach eines Kinos gibt Nicky ihr erstes, umjubeltes Rock-Konzert Wutenbrannt stürzt sich Pamelas Vater auf Disc-jockey Johnny Die 13jährige Pamela Pearl jobbt als Go-go-Girl, nachdem sie zu Hause ausgerissen ist Nicky (rechts) und Pamela träumen von einer Rock-Karriere -- Disc-Jockey Johnny (rechts) hilft ihnen dabei Nicky und Pamela auf dem Times Square. Sie sind in dieser Gegend bekannt wie bunte Hunde

May 1982, and Times Square was about to have its final premiere, in West Germany. Why did it take this long, over a year and a half after its initial premiere, and a year after the rest of Europe had seen it? I have no idea. But someone still had hope for the movie, as shown by the two-page spread in Bravo, featuring the same sort of excited plot synopsis published in Filmstar No. 3, Sonido No. 56 and Film Review Vol. 31 No. 2.

 

 

 

The big picture across the two pages was last seen in the February 1981 Movie 81 and on the Japanese movie poster. The picture on the top left of page 34 was the top middle image on the Mexican movie poster. The center photo on page 34, of Mr. Pearl attacking Johnny, is I think making its first appearance here. We last saw the bottom photo in the Japanese souvenir program book and flyer, and on a British lobby card. On page 35, the shot of Johnny at the mic was also a British lobby card, and appeared in Movie 81. And the bottom photo was also a British lobby card, last seen in Joepie No. 365 in March 1981, and first seen in the “Robert Stigwood Presents Times Square” folder from sometime in 1980 well before the movie’s release.

Here’s the text by Peter Rauscher in German, followed by my attempt at a translation.

Jetzt im Kino: TIMES SQUARE
IHR KONNT UNS ALLE MAL

Ein irrer Film mit heißer
Musik über die ausgeflipptesten
Teenager von New York

Die 16jährige Nicky Marotta (Robin Johnson) und die 13jährige Pamela Pearl (Trini Alvarado) liegen zusammen im Zimmer eines New Yorker Krankenhauses. Beide sollen auf ihren Geisteszustand untersucht werden. Nicky, weil sie eine notorische Streunerin ist; Pamela, weil ihr Vater, ein ehrgeiziger Politiker, mit ihr nicht mehr klarkommt.

Eines Tages überredet Nicky Pamela zur Flucht. Im Nachthemd entwischen sie aus dem Krankenhaus, schnappen sich einen Krankenwagen und brausen los. In einem alten Schuppen am Times Square, einem der berühmtesten und berüchtigtsten Plätze New Yorks, finden sie Unterschlupf.

So beginnt der Film „Times Square“ (in Deutschland hat er noch den Untertitel „Ihr könnt uns alle mal“). Die beiden Mädchen finden ihr „freies“ Leben herrlich. Sie tragen die ausgefallensten Klamotten, hören pausenlos heiße Musik und jobben abends in einer Kneipe. Nicky, die gut Gitarre spielt, singt mit einer Band,| Pamela arbeitet als Go-go-Girl.

Natürlich hat Pamelas Vater alle Hebel in Bewegung gesetzt, um seine Tochter zu finden. In den Fall hat sich auch der beliebte Discjockey Johnny LaGuardian (Tim Curry, der Dr. Frank N. Furter aus der „Rocky Horror Picture Show“) eingeschaltet. Er ist so eine Art Thomas Gottschalk. Ihm vertrauen die Teens, wenn er täglich am Mikrofon zu ihnen spricht.

Johnny findet die beiden und verspricht, ihnen zu helfen. So dürfen die Mädchen ein von Nicky komponiertes Lied über den Sender singen. Die jugendlichen Hörer sind begeistert. Johnny erzählt ihnen die Geschichte der beiden Ausreißerinnen.

Nicky und Pamela werden auf ihre Art zu „Heldinnen“. Einer der Höhepunkte des Films ist die Aufforderung von Nicky und Pamela, dem Götzen „Fernsehen“ abzuschwören. Und Hunderte machen mit: Zum Entsetzen der Eltern werfen die Teenager die Fernseh-Apparate einfach auf die Straße.

Doch die beiden Mädchen sehen bald ein, daß ihr Leben so nicht mehr weiterlaufen kann. Und wieder erweist sich der Discjockey Johnny als Retter. Er organisiert für Nicky ein Konzert auf dem Dach eines Kinos.

Aus allen Richtungen New Yorks strömen die Kids in gleicher Aufmachung wie Nicky und Pamela zum Times Square. Das Konzert, obwohl von der Polizei nicht genehmigt, wird ein Riesenerfolg. Nicky ist ihrem Traum, ein Rock- Star zu werden, nähergekommen.

Pamela kehrt zu ihrem Vater, der eingesehen hat, daß auch er viele Fehler gemacht hat, zurück.

Die beiden Hauptdarstellerinnen sind Neulinge. Nicky (Robin Johnson) wurde von der Schule weg engagiert, Pamela (Trini Alvarado) drehte bereits einen Film. Toll natürlich Tim Curry. Die Musik stammt unter anderem von Suzi Quatro, Pretenders, Roxy Music, Gary Numan, XTC, Ramones und Robin Gibb von den Bee Gees.

Text: Peter Raschner

Auf dem Dach eines Kinos gibt Nicky ihr erstes, umjubeltes Rock-Konzert

Wutenbrannt stürzt sich Pamelas Vater auf Disc-jockey Johnny

Die 13jährige Pamela Pearl jobbt als Go-go-Girl, nachdem sie zu Hause ausgerissen ist

Nicky (rechts) und Pamela träumen von einer Rock-Karriere — Disc-Jockey Johnny (rechts) hilft ihnen dabei

Nicky und Pamela auf dem Times Square. Sie sind in dieser Gegend bekannt wie bunte Hunde

In theaters now: TIMES SQUARE
YOU CAN ALL (KISS OUR ASSES)

A crazy film with hot
music about the freaky
teenagers of New York

16-year-old Nicky Marotta (Robin Johnson) and 13-year-old Pamela Pearl (Trini Alvarado) lie together in the room of a New York hospital. Both to have their mental health examined. Nicky because she is a notorious stray; Pamela because her father, an ambitious politician, can’t handle her any more.

One day Nicky persuades Pamela to escape. In their nightgowns they escape from the hospital, steal themselves an ambulance and zoom off. In an old shack in Times Square, one of the most famous and most notorious places in New York, they find shelter.

So begins the film “Times Square” (in Germany it also has the subtitle “You can all […] our […]”). Both girls find their “free” life wonderful. They wear outrageous clothes, listen to hot music nonstop and in the evening work in a bar. Nicky, who plays guitar well, sings with a band; Pamela works as a go-go girl.

Naturally Pamela’s father has pulled out all the stops to find his daughter. On this case the popular disc jockey Johnny LaGuardian (Tim Curry, Dr. Frank N. Furter from “The Rocky Horror Picture Show”) is also involved. He is a Thomas Gottschalk type. The teens trust him when he speaks daily through the microphone to them.

Johnny finds them both and promises to help them. So the girls sing a song composed by Nicky over the radio. The young listeners are inspired. Johnny tells them the story of the runaways.

Nicky and Pamela become in their own way “heroines.” One of the highlights of the film is the call of Nicky and Pamela to renounce the idol “television.” And hundreds join in: to the horror of their parents the teenagers simply throw their television sets to the street. But both girls soon see that their life cannot continue this way. And again Johnny the disc jockey comes to the rescue. He organizes a concert on the roof of a cinema for Nicky.

The Kids stream from all areas of New York to Times Square in outfits identical to Nicky and Pamela. The concert, although not authorized by the police, becomes a huge success. Nicky has come closer to her dream to become a rock star.

Pamela returns to her father who has realized that he also has made many mistakes.

Both leading actresses are newcomers. Nicky (Robin Johnson) was hired away from her school, Pamela (Trini Alvarado) previously made a film. Of course Tim Curry is terrific. The music is by, among others, Suzi Quatro, Pretenders, Roxy Music, Gary Numan, XTC, Ramones and Robin Gibb of the Bee Gees.

Text: Peter Raschner

On the roof of a cinema Nicky gives her first rock concert performance

Pamela’s father falls furiously on disc jockey Johnny

13-year-old Pamela Pearl works as a go-go girl, after she has run away from home

Nicky (right) and Pamela dream of a rock career – disc jockey Johnny helps (right) them at it

Nicky and Pamela in Times Square. They are known in this neighborhood as colorful dogs

I think that last caption might be better translated as “they are well known to the locals,” but I had a hard enough time rendering the German subtitle into colloquial and printable English.  

Would you like to know more?

Movie 81 No. 2, February 1981
Times Square movie poster, Japan, June 1981
Guerreras de Nueva York (Times Square movie poster, Mexico, 1981)
Times Square Program Book, Japan, June 1981, pages 14-19 (post 3 of 5)
U.K. Lobby Cards (post 2 of 3)
U.K. Lobby Cards (post 1 of 3)
Joepie, No. 365, March 15, 1981
Times Square Press Folder

 
 
Bravo No. 21, May 19, 1982, Germany (monthly (publication) (AAT ID: 300311879))
28 x 21.1 cm. (work);
Bravo No 21 p 1_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 797 px (W), 96 dpi, 622 kb
Bravo No 21 pp 34-35_layers_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 1633 px (W), 96 dpi, 1.03 MB
detail 1 p34 a_800px.jpg
611 px (H) x 800 px (W), 96 dpi, 344 kb
detail 2 p34 a_800px.jpg
765 px (H) x 800 px (W), 96 dpi, 340 kb
detail 3_p 34_800px.jpg
542 px (H) x 800 px (W), 96 dpi, 293 kb
detail_5_p35_a_800px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 698 px (W), 96 dpi, 515 kb
detail_6_p 35_layers_800px.jpg
585 px (H) x 800 px (W), 96 dpi, 313 kb (images)
 
Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+
 

Times Square movie poster, Thailand, 1981

Posted on 21st November 2018 in "Times Square"

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TIMES SQUARE movie poster from Thailand, 1981. Possibly unauthorized.  Text (translated from Thai):  ONE GIRL GROWS TOUGH, ANOTHER BECOMES COURAGEOUS THESE TWO JOIN TOGETHER TO MAKE THE MOST OUT OF THEIR REBELLIOUS LIVES         Presented by  Oriental Artist Treasury of Entertainment  ROBIN JOHNSON TRINI ALVARADO TIM CURRY  TIMES SQUARE ‘TWO’  NOW BEING SHOWN AT                                      ON  (Flyer inserts in the newspaper today) Printed in Thailand by The Siam Offset Co., Ltd. Tel 2860359 By Surat Pukkavesh, Printer/Advertiser               2864074

 

 

 

Movie posters in Thailand are an art form unto themselves. Google “Thai movie posters” and you will go down a rabbit hole you may take days to emerge from. Thai film distributors discard the authorized promotional materials and commission original painted montages in glorious colors. Some of the pages I looked at seemed to say that this practice ended in the 1990s… if so, we are all the poorer for it. But luckily for us, Times Square got the Thai treatment in 1981. The artist went a little heavy on Nicky’s eye shadow, but I can forgive this since the overall poster is so spectacular.

 

 

Unlike the Japanese materials I posted earlier, I hired a translator for the Thai items: Joy Busai at Thai English Headquarters — I can’t recommend her highly enough. (Although, her website seems to be down now, and my attempts to contact her to translate the article in my previous post went unanswered.) Here’s what the poster says in English:

 

ONE GIRL GROWS TOUGH, ANOTHER BECOMES COURAGEOUS
THESE TWO JOIN TOGETHER TO MAKE THE MOST OUT OF THEIR REBELLIOUS LIVES

Presented by
Oriental Artist
Treasury of Entertainment

ROBIN JOHNSON
TRINI ALVARADO
TIM CURRY

TIMES SQUARE
‘TWO’

NOW SHOWING AT _____ ON _____

(Flyer inserts in the newspaper today)
Printed in Thailand by The Siam Offset Co., Ltd. Tel 2860359
By Surat Pukkavesh, Printer/Advertiser 2864074

The only thing missing is the artist’s name. I think that’s a signature there in the lower right, but I’m not sure.

As in Mexico, Robin again gets top billing, and Tim Curry third. The Thai promoters may have been the first to have the insight that led them to give Times Square the secondary title, “Two”.

 

 

Times Square : “Two”
Thailand : poster : AAT ID: 300027221 : 77.9 x 55.7 cm : 1981 (work);
Times_Square_movie_poster_Thailand_1981_1080px.jpg
773 x 1080 px, 96 dpi, 555 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Filmstar, Vol 1 No. 3, Thailand, August 1981

Posted on 9th November 2018 in "Times Square"

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Cover of movie magazine from Thailand with article about TIMES SQUARE (1980)

 

 

 

By August 1981, Robin might already have figured out that neither she nor Andy Gibb were going to get a call telling them when to report to the Grease 2 set. Most of the world had already forgotten about Times Square. But it wasn’t quite over yet.

 

Thailand’s Filmstar magazine devoted four pages and the back cover to the upcoming release of Times Square. I tried and failed to get a professional translation of the article. Google Translate makes nearly as bad a hash of Thai as it does Japanese, but from what I can make out, this is a purely promotional article summarizing the plot, like the articles in Sonido No. 56 and Film Review Vol. 31 No. 2.

 

The caption and drawing on page 63, the first page of the article, are from the European movie poster, and the photo of Pammy and Nicky is TS-72-8A/14, the most-used photo of the girls together.

The image from the poster also appears on page 64, above UK Press Kit photo #4 of Tim Curry. The large photo of Robin, as far as I know, made its first appearance here. As she’s looking directly into the camera, I suspect it was taken at the same time as this pre-take shot, but since the background is cut out there’s just as good a chance it was taken at Pier 56.

The large image of Trini on page 65 looks to be from the same origin as that photo of Robin. Based on what I can make out of the lighting, I tend to think it’s from the outside location. It’s the only photo I’ve seen of Trini in that costume where she isn’t holding the boom box. The inset of the cops pushing Nicky into the back seat is another previously, and as far as I know, otherwise unpublished publicity still. The only matching shots in the film are from the opposite side of the car, and the film camera’s setup from this reverse angle is several feet to the left.

The shot of Robin as Nicky as Aggie Doone singing “Damn Dog” in the Cleo Club is yet another photo making its first appearance. But not its last… there’s a slightly better version yet to come.

So, amazingly, the Times Square publicity campaign was nearing its end, yet the places it was being published were being furnished with new material, despite it being highly unlikely that the local audiences would have seen any of the already-used photos. Unless, perhaps, the EMI/AFD publicity departments had decided that what they’d been doing was failing, and if they could only find the right photos, they could turn Times Square into a hit in the next country…

The back cover of Filmstar was a reproduction of the collage first published in Screen International No. 246 in June 1980 and used in February 1981 as the Australian movie poster, with the addition of Robin’s name in English. If there’s one thing all the local contemporary film publicity outlets agreed on, it’s that Robin herself was the most marketable aspect of the movie.
 

TIMES SQUARE Robin Johnson poster on the back cover of a movie magazine from Thailand

Posts mentioned above but not linked to:

Times Square Press Material folder (post 4 of 5)
Times Square UK Press Kit (post 2 of 4)
On Location
Times Square Program Book, Japan, June 1981, pages 20-24 (post 4 of 5)
Times Square Australian Daybill

 

 

Times Square (article, AAT ID: 300048715)
Filmstar Vol. 1 No. 3, 15 August 1981, pp. 63-66 (magazine (periodical), AAT ID: 300215389)
25.9 x 18.9 cm. (work);
Filmstar Vol 1 No 3_front_cover_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 789 px (W), 96 dpi, 553 kb
Filmstar Vol 1 No 3_p63_1080px_2.jpg
235 px (H) x 787 px (W), 96 dpi, 474 kb
Filmstar Vol 1 No 3_p64_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 774 px (W), 96 dpi, 428 kb
Filmstar Vol 1 No 3_p66_1080px.jpg
688 px (H) x 771 px (W), 96 dpi, 514 kb
Filmstar Vol 1 No 3_back_cover_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 777 px (W), 96 dpi, 679 kb
(images)
 

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

More stills from the UK series

Posted on 28th October 2018 in "Times Square"

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TIMES SQUARE (1980) publicity still, black and white 8"x10", #41 from the UK series  Text:  [on front:] 41  [on back:] [stamp:]  TIMES SQUARE  [in Hebrew and English] STILLER FILM LTD. L.A. [illegible] PHONES [illegible] TEL-AVIV  [handwritten]  [Times Square) [in Hebrew]  41  (41?) [in Hebrew?]

 

I nearly passed over this lot of five black and white stills, except it had one photo I’d never seen. Rather than try to haggle for just the one photo, I bought the lot, and I’m glad I did, because they’re all from the UK series, three of them were new numbers, and the others are slightly different again from the previous copies I have.

 

This shot is number 41, and the highest number I’ve yet found. (I have 18 of them.) It’s the one I thought I’d never seen, but I was wrong: it was published on the back of the “Times Square Trailer” UK soundtrack sampler record sleeve.

 

The other four are numbers 20, 23, 34, and 40.

 

 

All five have borders, where most of the series are printed full-bleed, all the way to the edges. Number 20 is the third copy and the third variant I’ve found. The first had the number printed to the right, against the grey background. The second was cropped more generously at the bottom, and had the number against the black of Nicky’s coat, but cut off at the bottom.. This one is cropped like that second version, and has the number in almost the same place, but up a few millimeters so it can be seen clearly. It also looks like it’s the exact same number stuck on the print – the handwriting looks identical in all three. I suppose this is obvious to anyone who works in movie promotion, but I am not one of those people — it would seem that whenever they needed more copies of an image, they dug out the negative, stuck on the number, and ran off a few prints, and every run ended up slightly different from every other.

 

Number 23 is TS-82-30/4, but cropped more generously at the top and bottom and more narrowly on the left and right. Number 34 is a second copy of the first photo I ever found from this series, but it’s printed much lighter, washing out Pammy’s face, and the number has moved from just to the left of the neon “Q” in “TIMES SQUARE” to inside the curve at the right. And number 40 is TS-42-11A/2, printed lighter with higher contrast, and cropped more generously at the left and bottom. Although it seems obvious now, seeing this is the first time I’ve realized that this shot, along with this one and this one, were taken as Robin was kneeling on top of the theater marquee, and the blurred lights behind her are the street below.

TIMES SQUARE (1980) publicity still, black and white 8"x10", from the UK series  Text:  [on front:] 23  [on back:] [stamp:]  TIMES SQUARE  [in Hebrew and English] STILLER FILM LTD. L.A. [illegible] PHONES [illegible] TEL-AVIV  [handwritten]  [Times Square) [in Hebrew]  (photo number?)

 

These prints were distributed in Israel by Stiller Film Ltd., whose partially visible stamp on their backs indicates that they had a local office in Tel Aviv. The prints also have the TIMES SQUARE stamp found on the backs of many, but not all, of the UK series, and what I believe is Times Square in handwritten Hebrew.

 

Pages referred to but not linked directly above:

Times Square Press Material folder (post 5 of 5)
Blast from the Past
Times Square Blue
Times Square UK Press Kit (post 4 of 4)
UK Promo Photo #29

 

 

20
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347
UK ; 8″ x 10″ (work)
UK still 20_1080px.jpg
863 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 362 kb (image)

23
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347
UK ; 8″ x 10″ (work)
UK still 23_1080px.jpg
867 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 353 kb (image)

UK still 23 back b_1080px.jpg
860 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 169 kb (image)

34
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347
UK ; 8″ x 10″ (work)
UK still 34_1080px.jpg
865 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 374 kb (image)

40
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347
UK ; 10″ x 8″ (work)
UK still 40_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 864 px (W), 96 dpi, 309 kb (image)

41
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347
UK ; 8″ x 10″ (work)
UK still 41_1080px.jpg
868 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 331 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+