Headshot, ITC version

Posted on 8th September 2016 in "Times Square"
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Inscription:  TIMES SQUARE  4  Robin Johnson makes her motion picture acting and singing debut after being discovered by chance at her high school in Brooklyn for the co-starring role with Tim Curry and Trini Alvarado in "Times Square."  ITC ENTERTAINMENT  AN acc COMPANY  Permission is hereby granted to newspapers and other periodicals to reproduce this photograph for publicity or advertising except for the endorsement of products. This must not be sold leased or given away  Printed in USA

Associated Film Distribution, which released Times Square in the US, was a partnership between Thorn-EMI (which released Times Square in the UK and most of the rest of the world), and ITC, which was primarily a producer of television in the UK. By the time Times Square came out, AFD was already struggling from the failures of Can’t Stop the Music and Raise the Titanic! earlier that summer, and even as Times Square hit theaters and Robin was traveling the world promoting it, EMI and ITC were already working to dissolve AFD and sell its films to Universal. As far as I know, Universal still owns the theatrical performance rights, as well as the only pristine print and the negative to Times Square (which was not destroyed in the 2008 Universal Studios fire as had been reported), although through the vagaries of multiple rights and companies rising and falling, all other rights in the property (not counting the soundtrack album) are held by StudioCanal.

Anyway, a few publicity stills were released in the UK with ITC credited as the producer, and this is one. It’s TS-Spec.3, cropped a little closer, and with the caption printed directly on it rather than included as a separate slip of paper. Interestingly, it was “Printed in USA.” Even more interestingly, there’s a little number “4” before the caption, implying there are at least three more ITC-variant photos. I know of at least one other that I don’t have. Less interestingly, it, like this one, is a duplicate of an American publicity photo we’ve already seen.

 

 

[Robin Johnson head shot, ITC variant]
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347, 7.75 in (W) x 10 in (H) (work);
1080 px (H) x 852 px (W), 96 dpi, 364 kb (image)

1981
inscription:
(on border)
TIMES SQUARE
4
Robin Johnson makes her motion picture acting and singing debut after being discovered by
chance at her high school in Brooklyn for the co-starring role with Tim Curry and Trini
Alvarado in “Times Square.”
ITC ENTERTAINMENT
AN acc COMPANY
Permission is hereby granted to newspapers and other periodicals to reproduce this photograph
for publicity or advertising except for the endorsement of products. This must not be sold
leased or given away
Printed in USA

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

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AFD Campaign Pressbook (pages 1-4)

Posted on 25th July 2015 in "Times Square"
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“Newcomer Robin Johnson is a revelation as Nicky…”

 

The Campaign Pressbook from Associated Film Distribution was a promotional tool for theater owners. The first part repeated almost verbatim the biographical articles from the Press Materials folder, but supplied them in a format with illustrations that could be sent directly to a newspaper and printed. For instance, the article on Robin is the same as the one in the press kit, but the paragraphs dealing with her birthday, her home life, and her “whatever” attitude toward an acting career have been removed, and a line added for the theater owner to insert the theater name and the date Times Square opens. All of the photos in the Pressbook are ones included with the press kit.

The cover is a variation of the poster, with the elements moved to fill a 600-line newspaper ad space (four columns by 150 lines). (Most of the Pressbook, in fact, consists of pages of variously-sized ads based on the poster, all ready to be cut out and sent to your local paper with your theater’s name added in the blank space provided.)

The “Synopsis” on pages 1 and 2 is an edited version of what was given in the press kit. The accompanying photo is cropped from TS-82-30.

“‘Times Square Opens _____ at the _____ Theatre” is an edited version of the “Photo Captions – General Information” sheet from the press kit, accompanied by press photo TS-72-8A/14.

Trini’s bio is word-for-word from the press kit, illustrated with her headshot TS-11-24/5. Robin’s bio starts on page 3, and concludes on page 4 with her headshot TS-57-26/1. The Tim Curry bio has a cropped version of TS-66-28/8, and the Alan Moyle article is accompanied by TS-78-2/16, the action shot of Peter Coffield and Tim Curry.

The article at the end of page 4 is a new, punched-up synopsis intended to get you, the theater owner, excited about the fantastic promotional gimmicks on the pages to follow:

TIMES SQUARE INTRODUCTION

Nicky Marotta is tough…funny…funky… talented. At sixteen, she’s been put away and put down often enough to last a lifetime. She roams Times Square with a hot-wired guitar and a portable amp, making music and trouble.

But Nicky may be off the street for awhile. She bashed the car of an arrogant club owner with a crowbar — and now she’s in the hospital, under observation.

Pamela Pearl is the daughter of a civic do-gooder who has sworn to clean up Times Square. She is scared…shy…delicately pretty. In a recent letter to an all-night deejay, she described herself as a “zombie.”

She is in the same hospital — taking the same tests — as Nicky.

That’s the start of a beautiful friendship that leads to a wild escape in a stolen ambulance…a crumbling Hudson River pier…and back to the neon night world of Times Square where Pammy and Nicky take on a new identity.

As the incredible Sleaze Sisters.

With half the city searching for them, and the other half cheering for them to stay lost, only one person knows where the teenagers will turn up next — or what they’ll do. He is dee jay Johnny LaGuardia, the Diogenes of the all-night broadcasting.

And he isn’t telling…

Set to the beat of today’s most popular music, TIMES SQUARE is bold…colorful…exciting…imaginative entertainment from Robert Stigwood, whose hold on the youth market is now established with hits like “Grease,” “Saturday Night Fever” and “Tommy.”

Tim Curry (Dr. Frankenfurter in the cult classic, “The Rocky Horror Picture Show) is Johnny LaGuardia, perched in a soundproof skyscraper studio above Times Square, turning urban sprawl into poetry.

Newcomer Robin Johnson is a revelation as Nicky, teaching her new-found friend the ropes of roughing it and toughing it on 42nd Street. She’s also a dynamite singer, whose rendition of “Damn Dog” becomes a rallying cry for a million kids — in the movie — and is poised to zoom to the top of the charts in reality.

Trini Alvarado brings a cameo beauty and disarming appeal to the role of “Pammy,” who finds the courage to defy her uptight father — and his upright principles — by dancing in a Times Square nightery. She does it for friendship..for Sleaze Sister Nicky… and that’s all that matters.

Whether they’re creating a road hazard as windshield washing vagrants …developing a new teen-age fad, the rag-tag “look”… coming down on television…or coming up with kooky ideas to enlighten a city…the teamwork is terrific.

And the finale, atop a 42nd Street theatre marquee — where a swarm of chanting kids have gathered to hear the Sleaze Sisters play their spectacular swan song — is the best thing of its kind since “Meet John Doe.”

Kids will soon start picking up the Sleaze Sisters’ slogans (like “No sense makes sense”), their outrageous fashions and their music. But you can help that excitement get rolling by taking advantage of some sensational promotional opportunities.

Here’s what we mean….

 

 

AFD. “Times Square” Campaign Pressbook. Los Angeles: Associated Film Distribution, 1980, pp. 1-4;
black and white, 14.75 in (H) x 10.5 in (W), 20 pp (work)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

The Mystery of the Double-Sided Poster, Side Two

Posted on 28th June 2015 in "Times Square"
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Designed to be opened one fold at a time, the blue side is a promotional presentation for "Times Square" and its soundtrack, and the red side is a full poster. This is the red side.  Text:  TIMES SQUARE Can you feel my fever? Can you hear me howl? I'm just a Damn Dog. Tune into me because I am tuned into you. STICK IT IN YOUR EAR. NO SENSE MAKES SENSE They tell me I'm crazy. But the truth is I just know bullshit when I see it.Fully opening the two-sided poster reveals my favorite version of the image most associated with Times Square.

As I mentioned last time, I find the red background more visually pleasing than the yellow used on the movie poster and soundtrack album cover. There are several other differences in this version, as well. The Seiniger designers have collaged the black and white photos of Robin and Trini, but here they’re of equal height; the future versions will make Trini seem significantly shorter than Robin. Also, this is the only time we get to see Robin’s right shoulder; the movie poster and album cover cut her out at the lapel.

This side doesn’t use the DYMO label-style typeface, but it does use Nicky’s pins as a design element, floating quotes from the film and Tim Curry’s image in badges. The Tim Curry button will later find its way to Nicky’s left lapel, which for now plays host to a button with the RSO cow. The buttons-scattered-across-the-poster idea will later be used by the Japanese promotion artists, although their choices of what constitute statements of rebellion will face a bit of a language barrier.

The artists do a masterful job of colorizing the black and white photographs, but either they had no color reference photos or they made an artistic decision for reasons of their own, because they made Robin’s eyes blue. Robin’s eyes are green with a trace of brown. Trini’s eyes here are pretty much the color of Robin’s eyes in real life. I don’t know what color Trini’s eyes really are.

There are color photos that were taken at the same time as the black and white shot of Nicky so I also don’t know why they felt the need to slather eye shadow on Nicky that she certainly wasn’t wearing. I’ve never once had the feeling that Nicky was an eye shadow kind of girl. The closest thing we ever see to her applying make-up is to paint a mask across the entire top half of her face. Even though the poster designers had finally gotten a very good handle on what the film was trying to get across, they didn’t quite understand the character of Nicky. It’s another attempt to make her just a little more girly, like the Press Folder’s misspelling her name as “Nikki.”

 

 

[“Times Square” double-sided promotional poster, inside]
color, 39 in (H) x 25.75 in (W) (work);
712 px (W) x 1080 px (H), 510 kb (image)
1980, Seiniger & Associates

inscription:
TIMES SQUARE
Can you feel my fever? Can you hear me howl? I’m just a Damn Dog.
Tune into me because I am tuned into you.
STICK IT IN YOUR EAR.
NO SENSE MAKES SENSE
They tell me I’m crazy. But the truth is I just know bullshit when I see it.

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Robin Johnson’s Times Square Headshot, “TS-Spec.3”

Posted on 10th June 2015 in "Times Square"
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Publicity headshot of Robin Johnson for publicity for "Times Square" (1980). This photo was distributed with a caption sheet identifying it at "TS-Spec.3." [Inscription] "TIMES SQUARE" AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution

TS-Spec.3
Robin Johnson makes her motion picture acting and singing debut after being discovered by chance at her high school in Brooklyn for the co-starring role with Tim Curry and Trini Alvarado in “Times Square.”


 

This is one of my favorite pictures of Robin, appearing for the first time not in character. I agree with DefeatedandGifted that it wasn’t part of the US press kit, even though it’s designed identically and even came with a folded-over caption sheet, just like the the photos in the press kit. However, none of the press kits I’ve seen contained it; I think if a press kit turns up with one of these in it, it’s because someone has recently inserted it thinking it belonged there.

Also, it has a different numbering system. “TS-Spec.3” sets it apart from the press kit photos, whose numbers imply scene/shot numbers. “Spec.” seems, well, special. And the “3” implies to me that there are a “1” and a “2” somewhere — headshots of Trini Alvarado and Tim Curry, perhaps? — but I’ve never seen anything like that. As far as I know, only Robin got a photo from AFD as herself.
 

The full caption sheet accompanying the "Times Square" publicity headshot of Robin Johnson. Text: TS-Spec.3 "TIMES SQUARE" Robin Johnson makes her motion picture acting and singing debut after being discovered by chance at her high school in Brooklyn for the co-starring role with Tim Curry and Trini Alvarado in "Times Square." ©1980 Associated Film Distribution Publicity Department, AFD, 12711 Ventura Blvd., Studio City, CA. 91604 "Times Square," a contemporary drama with music starring Tim Curry, Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado, is a Robert Stigwood Presentation, produced by Stigwood and Jacob Brackman and directed by Alan Moyle from Brackman's screenplay, based on a story by Moyle and Leanne Unger, with Kevin McCormick and John Nicollela the executive producers and Bill Oakes the associate producer. The EMI Films motion picture will be released on Friday, October 17 in the U.S. and Canada by AFD (Associated Film Distribution). ©1980 Associated Film Distribution Publicity Department, AFD, 12711 Ventura Blvd., Studio City, CA. 91604

 

 

TS-Spec.3
black and white photographic print, 8 in (W) x 10 in (H) (work);
1080 px (W) x 859 px (H), 96 dpi, 178 kb (image)

1980
inscription:
(on border) TIMES SQUARE
AFD
©1980 Associated
Film Distribution

 

[TS-Spec.3 accompanying caption sheet]
7.3 in (W) x 6.5 in (H) (work);
856 px x 757 px, 96 dpi, 136 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

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Times Square Press Material folder (post 5 of 5)

Posted on 1st June 2015 in "Times Square"
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Publicity still of Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado from the "Times Square" US Press Materials folder. Text: TIMES SQUARE AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution

TS-82-30
Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado are New York teenagers whose runaway antics and revolt against authority make them the talk of The Big Apple through the radio reports of an all-night disc jockey in “Times Square.”

 

 

The last photos from the press kit. To the left, Pammy and Nicky on the roof from which they toss their first television set, although here Nicky appears to be translating a radio broadcast for Pammy. Nothing like this occurs in the film; this photo, however, will be turned into a line drawing and used to advertise the movie’s opening in Germany. Its full code number is nearly impossible to see, as it’s written in white against the white background in the lower right corner. The first three segments (TS-82-30) are on the caption sheet. I think the last segment is “/4.”

 

 

 

 

Publicity still of Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado atop the Times Square Theater marquee, from the "Times Square" US Press Materials folder. Text: TS-28-28/7 TIMES SQUARE AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution

TS-28-28
Robin Johnson, as self-styled “Sleaze Sister,” takes a final rebellious stand against authority atop a Times Square theater marquee, as Trini Alvarado, her fellow runaway and Sleaze Sister, watches in the nerve-tingling climactic scene of “Times Square.”

 

 

 

 

 

To the right is the photo from which the last image on my post of stuff I found on the Web was edited, as Sarah from Vintage Salt informed me shortly after that post went up. I even had a version of that same picture as my Facebook cover image at the time, and somehow I just never made the connection. It’s another of the many photos taken of the concert.

 

 

 

Publicity still of Tim Curry from the "Times Square" US Press Materials folder. Text: (on image) TS-79-28/8 (on border) TIMES SQUARE AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution

TS-79-28
Tim Curry, British actor-singer best known for his rock star role in “The Rocky Horror Picture Show,” is starred as Johnny LaGuardia, all-night disc jockey in New York, whose encouragement on the air to two runaway teenage girls turns them into minor media celebrities in “Times Square.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heeeeere’s Johnny! A glamour shot of Tim Curry as Johnny LaGuardia, in costume for his reporting on the final concert, standing on the balcony of the Candler Building overlooking the Times Square Theater. His telescope is visible there at the right.

 

 

 

Black & white publicity still of Robin Johnson in costume as Nicky Marotta from the last scene of the film, from the "Times Square" US Press Materials folder. Text: TS-104-17A/2 AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution TIMES SQUARE

TS-42-11A
Robin Johnson effects a garish costume and make-up as she and her fellow teenage runaway flaunt authority as the “Sleaze Sisters” on their wild dash through the back streets of New York City in “Times Square.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

And finally, Robin. This must have been taken at the same time as this slide, but this is the shot they went with. I’d love to see it in color.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To wrap things up, here is the press kit’s biography of Robin. It’s four pages. Trini gets two pages. Robert Stigwood gets three. Tim Curry only rates one page. Someone certainly realized which side their promotion was buttered on.

It features a second, longer telling of her “discovery,” as well as her view of the production as a job, and not one she was necessarily even considering continuing.

“TIMES SQUARE” STAR ROBIN JOHNSON IS A NATURAL IN SCREEN BOW

At some time in the future Brooklyn’s Technological High School steps may become legendary as the spot where a star was “born,” the 1980 equivalent to Hollywood’s Schwab’s Drugstore. On those steps and waiting for classes to begin, 16-year-old Robin Johnson was discovered by an (unknown) casting scout on the lookout for possible candidates for the leading role in “Times Square,” an October release from AFD (Associated Film Distribution).

“He gave me this card and said to call this number if I was interested in being in a movie,” Robin recalls in her inimitable Brooklyn-accented speech. “I thought: Wow! Another wise guy. But I gave it a shot.”

What Robin didn’t know at the time was that the film’s director, Alan Moyle, who had written the original story for “Times Square” with Leanne Unger, was determined to cast only the young actress who would be precisely right for the crucial central role of Nicky Marotta, a spunky teenager loose and without adult supervision, determined to become a rock star. The talent search already had bypassed many of the traditional avenues and scoured youth centers, punk rock clubs, and placed ads in papers such as the Village Voice, Soho News, and Aquarian.

“We were looking for someone who WAS Nicky,” Moyle admits. “Robin is definitely not that doomed child. Luckily for the film, Robin brought a lot more humor to the character than what I had originally envisioned. Her youthful innocence and energy buoy up what might have been played as too much of a downer.”

Without any previous experience (“I had sung in a choir when I was 12”), Robin won the role over literally hundreds of other candidates. Upon winning the role, she entered an intensive program of singing lessons and a dance and movement regimen. Making this film meant that the novice had to be transformed quickly into a seasoned professional. Robin worked seven days straight for 12 weeks. As a minor, the new “star” had to continue her studies with a tutor on the set and more learning sessions on Saturdays. On Sundays, recording or dancing demands took up the day. Veteran members of the New York film crew were dazzled by the professionalism of both Robin and her even younger co-star, 13-year-old Trini Alvarado. Both exhibited an almost non-stop flow of dedication, energy, high spirits and raucous good humor.

Robin Johnson lives with her older sister Cindy and their mother in the Park Slope area of Brooklyn, New York. Born May 29, 1964, Robin never gave any thought to becoming an actress until “Times Square.” Her inclination previously ran to sketching (“I’m not into landscapes; give me cartoons with some people in there.”) and, whenever the opportunity arose, banging on drums. And although she first started “dating” when she was 11, she’s not worried about permanent relationships at this point in her life. “I’m closest with my sister Cindy, who’s a year older. We’re both Geminis and I like to argue, especially in a friendly way.”

As do many young women her age, Robin can identify with Nicky’s rebelliousness and non-confirmity, traits which land Nicky in trouble with the law and into the arms of a concerned social worker. “Nicky can’t put things over on her like she does with others,” Robin figures, “and that’s the reason she admires her. I have trouble with authority figures, too, which means anybody with the upper hand—my principal, my mother, my teachers.”

Of director Alan Moyle, who might be considered the supreme authority figure, Robin has only praise. “We’re alike in certain ways and that made it easier to relate. Alan’s absolutely brilliant for inspiration, for giving you energy for a scene. When he believes you can do a scene better, he gets you to think, but not with bullying or intimidation I really want to work with him again.”

Robin perceives Nicky as a teenager, masking what she really feels and tried to “make her real.” “She was bitter about being abandoned. Her dad’s a loser. All she can do is pity him, not be mad at him now. Nicky has a lot of gutsiness that I really admired. Her philosophy always was: ‘When you’re mad, show it.'”

Gutsiness is a trait Robin and Nicky have in common. Robin, as well as being bright, witty and talented, is seemingly fearless, whether performing atop a 42nd Street theater marquee or being dunked into the icy December brine of the polluted Hudson River. “Nerves don’t get you anywhere,” she says, simply enough.

Robin was coached for “Times Square” by veteran Sue Seaton, who has worked with the spectrum from Katharine Hepburn to Gilda Radner. But that throaty timbre is unmistakably Robin’s own, perhaps a result of her ever-present Kool cigarettes (“Kools are cool”).

The closest Robin had ever been to a movie set before “Times Square” was when “The Wanderers” shot a scene down the block in her neighborhood. Now, the world of movies is opening for her. “Let me tell you about this movie business,” she says seriously. “There’s no right for anyone to get an attitude just because so many people are aware of your job. What I say is, it’s entertainment and it’s a job. I hope ‘Times Square’ does well, but it’s not the answer to my life. Most, I loved meeting and working with so many wonderful people.”

There is one confession she’ll make when prodded about the rigors of working in the realm of make-believe: “Oh yeah,” she says with a grimace, “chewing the roses was pretty disgusting. I’d never tasted flowers before.”

“Times Square,” starring Robin with Tim Curry and Trini Alvarado, is a Robert Stigwood Presentation, directed by Alan Moyle from Jacob Brackman’s screenplay. The new film was co-produced by Stigwood and Brackman, with Kevin McCormick and John Nicolella as Executive Producers and Bill Oakes the Associate Producer.

 

 

TS-82-30[/4]
1080 px (H) x 857 px (W), 96 dpi, 330 kb (image)
TS-28-28/7
1080 px (H) x 865 px (W), 96 dpi, 305 kb (image)
TS-79-28/8
1080 px (W) x 855 px (H), 96 dpi, 226 kb (image)
TS-42-11A/2
1080 px (H) x 855 px (W), 96 dpi, 276 kb (image)
black and white photographic prints, 8 in (H) x 10 in (W) (works);

1980
inscriptions: [on photos] TS-82-30[/4?]; TS-28-28/7; TS-79-28/8; TS-42-11A/2;
(on borders) TIMES SQUARE
AFD
©1980 Associated
Film Distribution

 

“TIMES SQUARE” STAR ROBIN JOHNSON IS A NATURAL IN SCREEN BOW, pp. 1-4
8.5 in (W) x 11 in (H) (works);
1080 px (H) x 840 px (W), 96 dpi, 293 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 836 px (W), 96 dpi, 300 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 835 px (W), 96 dpi, 293 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 835 px (W), 96 dpi, 78.9 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square Press Material folder (post 2 of 5)

Posted on 5th May 2015 in "Times Square"
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Times Square… introduces Robin Johnson, dynamic 16-year-old Brooklyn actress and singer in her film debut.”



Okay, forget what I said last time about posting the pictures in the order they occur in the film. There are too many without Robin in them to do it in a way that I find aesthetically pleasing without posting them all at once, and I don’t feel like doing that. Besides, the photo I posted last time was #4 in that order, so I’m already not doing it.

So, here are three photos from the AFD Times Square Press Material folder.

Publicity still of  Trini Alvarado from the "Times Square" US Press Materials folder.  Text:  (on image) TS-11-24/5  (on border) TIMES SQUARE AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution

TS-11-24
Trini Alvarado, who made an impressive screen debut in Robert Altman’s “Rich Kids,” now is co-starred with Robin Johnson and portrays Pamela Pearl, troubled daughter of an ambitious politician, who becomes a runaway and a rebel against authority in “Times Square.”

 

 

 


 

 
This is the photo of Trini that was used, with the photo of Robin from last time, to make the collage that was the American movie poster and the soundtrack album cover. Even now, I find it a bit disconcerting to realize that that wasn’t really a picture of the two of them together, but was assembled from these two separate photos. Of course nearly all movie posters are put together that way, but, still…

 

Publicity still of Tim Curry in the WJAD control room, from the "Times Square" US Press Materials folder.  Text:  (on image) TS-66-28/9  (on border) TIMES SQUARE AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution

TS-66-28
Tim Curry, British actor-singer best known for his rock star role in “The Rocky Horror Picture Show,” is starred as Johnny LaGuardia, all-night disc jockey in New York whose encouragement on the air to two runaway teenage girls turns them into minor media celebrities in “Times Square.”



 

 

This photo of Tim Curry was probably taken at the same time as the photo published in The Aquarian and Prevue. It’s similar to the image of Tim later used in the poster design, but not identical: he’s looking right at us there, as we’ll see, um, soon enough. In my opinion, though, that picture isn’t as good a likeness as the poster versions of Robin and Trini, so it’s possible the artist used this as the basis for an illustration that changed the pose, rather than repainting the photo directly. I haven’t yet found a photo that matches up to Button Johnny.

 

 

 

 

Publicity still of Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado in Pier 56, from the "Times Square" US Press Materials folder.   Text: TS-109-16/12 TIMES SQUARE AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution

TS-109-16
Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado portray New York runaway teenagers who revolt against authority and are encouraged to continue their escapades and “fly” by an all-night radio disc jockey in “Times Square.”

 

 

 

And this shot from the “‘NICKY!!’ ‘PAMMY!!!'” scene, which I assume you’ll trust me by now, doesn’t match up to any frame in the film. It’s not shot from quite that angle, and while she’s speaking Robin bends down to Trini’s eye level. As usual, the photo was taken at the time of the filming, but isn’t a photo of what ended up in the film.

All the photo caption sheets also have the title TIMES SQUARE after the ID number, and end with the lines “Publicity Department, AFD, 12711 Ventura Blvd., Studio City, CA. 91604 / AFD / ©1980 Associated / Film Distribution”. Leaving that in makes the captions here even more unwieldy than they already are. So, it’s here, if you need it.

 
Most of the captions also contain the phrase “revolt” or “rebel against authority,” but I’m leaving those in.

 

Also, here is the “General Information” sheet that leads off the photo pack.

Sheet accompanying photographs in the US Press Materials folder. Text: TIMES SQUARE PHOTO CAPTIONS GENERAL INFORMATION "Times Square," a contemporary drama with music, stars the bright new talents of Tim Curry, British performer best known for "The Rocky Horror Picture Show," Trini Alvarado, who scored a remarkable screen bow in Robert Altman's "Rich Kids," and introduces Robin Johnson, dynamic 16-year-old Brooklyn actress and singer in her film debut. "Times Square," filmed at diverse New York locations, including Times Square's infamous "Deuce," is highlighted by 20 original songs, exemplifying some of the best contemporary rock music and performed by leading recording artists, as well as the feminine co-stars Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado. "Times Square" depicts the misadventures of two rebellious teenage girls, one from an affluent environment, the other a product of the streets. Together, they flee from their room in a neurological hospital, commandeer an ambulance and begin a series of wild and bizarre escapades, with their behavior reported by an all-night disc jockey who urges them on as their antics turn them into minor media celebrities. Their flight from authority of any kind is climaxed in a nerve-tingling dramatic conclusion atop the marquee of a Times Square theater, as hundreds of their teenage followers below cheer in tribute. "Times Square," a Robert Stigwood Presentation, was produced by Stigwood and Jacob Brackman and was directed by Alan Moyle from Brackman's screenplay, based on a story by Moyle and Leanne Unger. Kevin McCormick and John Nicollela are the executive producers, and Bill Oakes is associate producer. The EMI Films motion picture is released in the U.S. and Canada by AFD (Associated Film Distribution).

For what it’s worth, it reads:

TIMES SQUARE

PHOTO CAPTIONS

GENERAL INFORMATION

“Times Square,” a contemporary drama with music, stars the bright new talents of Tim Curry, British performer best known for “The Rocky Horror Picture Show,” Trini Alvarado, who scored a remarkable screen bow in Robert Altman’s “Rich Kids,” and introduces Robin Johnson, dynamic 16-year-old Brooklyn actress and singer in her film debut.

“Times Square,” filmed at diverse New York locations, including Times Square’s infamous “Deuce,” is highlighted by 20 original songs, exemplifying some of the best contemporary rock music and performed by leading recording artists, as well as the feminine co-stars Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado.

“Times Square” depicts the misadventures of two rebellious teenage girls, one from an affluent environment, the other a product of the streets. Together, they flee from their room in a neurological hospital, commandeer an ambulance and begin a series of wild and bizarre escapades, with their behavior reported by an all-night disc jockey who urges them on as their antics turn them into minor media celebrities. Their flight from authority of any kind is climaxed in a nerve-tingling dramatic conclusion atop the marquee of a Times Square theater, as hundreds of their teenage followers below cheer in tribute.

“Times Square,” a Robert Stigwood Presentation, was produced by Stigwood and Jacob Brackman and was directed by Alan Moyle from Brackman’s screenplay, based on a story by Moyle and Leanne Unger. Kevin McCormick and John Nicollela are the executive producers, and Bill Oakes is associate producer. The EMI Films motion picture is released in the U.S. and Canada by AFD (Associated Film Distribution).

More to come. If you’re really ansty, DefeatedandGifted has already long since posted all of these pictures, including a set that was apparently released in 1981 that I don’t have, so you might as well just go over there anyway. Go on. You were just visiting anyway! GET OUTTA HERE!!! –Sorry about that. See you in week or so.

 

 

TS-11-24/5
1080 px (H) x 857 px (W), 96 dpi, 270 kb (image)
TS-66-28/8
1080 px (H) x 860 px (W), 96 dpi, 254 kb (image)
TS-109-16/12
1080 px (W) x 857 px (H), 96 dpi, 197 kb (image)
black and white photographic prints, 8 in (H) x 10 in (W) (works);

1980
inscriptions: [on photos] TS-11-24/5; TS-66-28/8; TS-109-16/12;
(on borders) TIMES SQUARE
AFD
©1980 Associated
Film Distribution

 

TIMES SQUARE PHOTO CAPTIONS GENERAL INFORMATION
8 in (W) x 10 in (H) (work);
1080 px (H) x 836 px (W), 96 dpi, 258 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square Press Material folder (post 1 of 5)

Posted on 26th April 2015 in "Times Square"
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The US Press Kit for "Times Square" (1980); outside front cover of the folder  Text:  TIMES  SQUARE PRESS MATERIAL
Generally referred to as The Press Kit, this is the big-ass promotional package AFD released in North America. Since they didn’t have a table of contents, I can’t be sure what all was in it, not without examining all of them… which is impossible because I’m afraid most of them have been taken apart, the text pages tossed, and the photos sold off individually, because, hey, more money that way. But I have seen four of them, and although two are missing items the others have, the most complete ones contain:

  • 1 8″ x 10″ sheet of “PHOTO CAPTIONS GENERAL INFORMATION”
  • 16 8″ x 10″ black and white photos with accompanying caption sheets affixed to their back and folded over their fronts
  • 8 information packets, totaling 37 8.5″ x 11″ pages:
    • SYNOPSIS (5 pp.)
    • ROBERT STIGWOOD Presents “TIMES SQUARE” (8 pp.)
    • PRODUCTION INFORMATION (8 pp.)
    • ROBERT STIGWOOD BIOGRAPHY (3 pp.)
    • BRITISHER TIM CURRY ACTING RARITY–SKILLED IN MODERN AND CLASSIC (1 p.)
    • “TIMES SQUARE” STAR ROBIN JOHNSON IS A NATURAL IN SCREEN BOW (4 pp.)
    • TRINI ALVARADO–SHOW BUSINESS ‘PRO’ AT 13 (2 pp.)
    • FILM DIRECTOR MOYLE KEEPS HIS COOL ON FIRST MAJOR FILM (3 pp.)
    • MUSIC FROM ‘TIMES SQUARE’ NOW TWO-RECORD SOUNDTRACK ON RSO RECORDS (3 pp.)

I also don’t know for sure what order the items originally went in. Except for today, I’m going to post the images in the order the scenes they represent appear in the film, and not with their caption sheets, although I will include the text from them in their captions (as you can see below). I don’t have unlimited server space, so two copies of each picture is kind of out of the question at the moment. I’m also only going to post the texts that mention Robin, unless, say, I get several dozen requests clamoring for the biography of Robert Stigwood.

So, to start with, here’s the U.S. Press Kit version of the picture we saw here, with and without the caption sheet.

This version is more tightly cropped than the previous one, but it’s lower contrast, so we can read her “I Am Anonymous – Help Me” button. The other version has a tiny number “36” on it, which is cropped out of this version and replaced by the longer number consistent with the rest of the AFD publicity stills.

By this time they’ve settled on the trademarked logo for the film title. The caption sheets all omit the last digit of the number printed onto the photographs: this photo is TS-57-26/1, but the caption sheet identifies it as TS-57-26. As I said before, I also don’t know what the numbers signify. “TS” is obviously “Times Square,” but the rest… scene-shot/take, maybe? This particular photo is just a publicity glamor shot, as well. So, I’m waiting for someone who knows more about it to tell me.

The bottom of the caption sheets, which are on the backs of the photos the way they’re folded, are all identical:

"Times Square," a contemporary drama with music starring Tim Curry,  Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado,  is a Robert Stigwood Presentation,  produced by Stigwood and Jacob Brackman and directed by Alan Moyle from  Brackman's screenplay, based on a story by Moyle and Leanne Unger, with  Kevin McCormick and John Nicollela the executive producers and Bill Oakes  the associate producer. The EMI Films motion picture will be released on Friday,  October 17  in the U.S.  and Canada by AFD   (Associated Film Distribution). * Publicity Department, AFD,  12711 Ventura Blvd., Studio City, CA.  91604 AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution

And, just for kicks, here are the pages from the credits packet that have Robin’s name on them.

Funny, I never noticed before, even in 1980 David Johansen’s publishing company was called Buster Poindexter, Inc.

 

 

TIMES SQUARE PRESS MATERIAL
folder: 9 in (W) x 12 in (H) (work);
1080 px (H) x 888 px (W), 96 dpi, 386 kb (image);
left pocket contains: 1 8 in (W) x 10 in (H) sheet: “PHOTO CAPTIONS GENERAL INFORMATION”, 16 8 in x 10 in black and white photos with accompanying caption sheets affixed to their back and folded over their fronts;
right pocket contains 8 information packets, totalling 37 8.5 in (W) x 11 in (H) pages: SYNOPSIS (5 pp.), ROBERT STIGWOOD Presents “TIMES SQUARE” (8 pp.), PRODUCTION INFORMATION (8 pp.), ROBERT STIGWOOD BIOGRAPHY (3 pp.), BRITISHER TIM CURRY ACTING RARITY–SKILLED IN MODERN AND CLASSIC (1 p.), “TIMES SQUARE” STAR ROBIN JOHNSON IS A NATURAL IN SCREEN BOW (4 pp.), TRINI ALVARADO–SHOW BUSINESS ‘PRO’ AT 13 (2 pp.), FILM DIRECTOR MOYLE KEEPS HIS COOL ON FIRST MAJOR FILM (3 pp.), MUSIC FROM ‘TIMES SQUARE’ NOW TWO-RECORD SOUNDTRACK ON RSO RECORDS (3 pp.);

1980

 

TS-57-26 [with caption sheet]
black and white photographic print, 8 in (W) x 10 in (H) (work)
1080 px (H) x 857 px (W);
96 dpi, 279 kb (image)

1980
inscription: [on caption sheet:] TS-57-26
“TIMES SQUARE”
Robin Johnson, 16-year-old Brooklyn miss, makes her feature film singing and acting debut as Nicky Marotta, an uninhibited product of the streets who sets New York City on edge as a wild runaway from authority in “Times Square.”
Publicity Department, AFD, 12711 Ventura Blvd., Studio City, CA. 91604
AFD
©1980 Associated Film Distribution

 

TS-57-26/1
black and white photographic print, 8 in (H) x 10 in (W) (work);
1080 px (H) x 861 px (W), 96 dpi, 306 kb (image)

1980
inscription: [on photo] TS-57-26/1
[on border] TIMES SQUARE
AFD
©1980 Associated Film Distribution

 

[Back of US press kit caption sheets]
[full caption sheet, not pictured:] 7 in (W) x 6 in (H) (work);
858 px (W) x 364 px (H), 96 dpi, 104 kb (image)

 

ROBERT STIGWOOD Presents “TIMES SQUARE”, pp. 1, 2, 7
8.5 in (W) x 11 in (H) (works);
1080 px (H) x 835 px (W), 96 dpi, 128 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 835 px (W), 96 dpi, 196 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 836 px (W), 96 dpi, 244 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Odds and Ends

Posted on 8th April 2015 in "Times Square"
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Before moving on, I mentioned some time ago some pictures I’ve only seen on the Web and not found any physical copies of. So, here they are. Some of them anyway.

I’d found a bunch of these at Cineplex, having been digitized by Baseline Research, but as I was assembling this post I found that about half of them were taken from a set of 1981 UK lobby cards. Since they’re all the same size, that would lead me to suspect that there are more lobby cards that I haven’t found yet. (There also seem to be two entirely different sets of UK lobby cards, but I’m getting ahead of myself.) But without knowing for sure, these are just free-floating publicity stills with no provenance before being scanned in 2010, and I’m putting them here.

I posted these first two awhile back, on November 6, 2014:
o-TIMES-900 M8DTISQ EC001

The first was used to promote the May 21, 2014 screening of Times Square at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. I’d never seen it before. The second is the most complete version of that image I’ve seen, and it turns out to have been a UK lobby card. (I’ll post the lobby cards when Times Square opens in England. Right now, they’re still trying to put the soundtrack and US ad campaign together.)

 

MSDTISQ EC002
 
This one was also printed in black and white by Associated Film Distribution in the format of the photos used in the US press kit.

You can see it here at DefeatedandGifted’s “Times Square Fandom” blog, along with 3 other photos I don’t have. Strangely, those photos are copyrighted 1981 by AFD, and as far as I know AFD wasn’t promoting the film after it closed in the US in November 1980. They certainly weren’t included in the US Press Materials folder. Back to this particluar image, it’s the other shot that shows some behind-the-scenes action that I mentioned here: you can see a crowd of kids behind a barricade watching the filming.
 

TIMES SQUARE, Trini Alvarado, Robin Johnson, 1980

 

 

 

 

This one was used many times, but this version shows more of the background than any other I’ve seen.

 

TIMES SQUARE, Trini Alvarado, Robin Johnson, 1980

 
 

Both Trini and Robin just look so angelic here. I love it.

 
And, look closely at Nicky’s guitar. Compare it to the picture above. This photo was taken before they taped over the word “Rickenbacker” on the headstock. There are a few publicity stills where the guitar’s make is visible, just like there are quite a few of Robin holding a Kent with its big distinctive “K,” but in the film the guitar brands are both blacked out.

 

 
And, finally,
TIMES SQUARE, 1980. (c) Associated Film.
Robin Johnson, "Times Square"

 

 

 

 
If I come across physical copies of any of these in the future, you’ll be the first to know.

 

 

Times Square (1980) directed by Allan Moyle shown: Robin Johnson, Trini Alvarado (o-TIMES-900-300×199.jpg)
900 px (W) x 598 px (H), 300 dpi, 140 KB (image)
1979/1980
retrieved on 2014-05-01 from Brooks, Katherine. “12 Films That Pay Homage To Punk Rock Girls.” The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, Inc., 1 May 2014.

 

TIMES SQUARE, from left, Robin Johnson, Trini Alvarado, 1980, ©Associated Film . (86548_full.jpg)
1000 px (W) x 685 px (H), 300 dpi, 98.4 KB (image)
1979/1980
retrieved on 2014-10-22 from “Times Square.” Cineplex. Cineplex Entertainment LP, n.d.

 

MSDTISQ EC002 (262141_full.jpg)
1000 px (W) x 664 px (H), 300 dpi, 113 KB (image)
MSDTISQ EC001 (262140_full.jpg)
1000 px (W) x 667 px (H), 300 dpi, 83.3 KB (image)
MSDTISQ EC003 (262142_full.jpg)
1000 px (W) x 673 px (H), 300 dpi, 79.4 KB (image)
MBDTISQ EC001 (102361_full.jpg)
808 px (W) x 1000 px (H), 300 dpi, 134 KB (image)
1979/1980
retrieved on 2014-10-25 from “Times Square.” Cineplex. Cineplex Entertainment LP, n.d.

 

tumblr_n92trfhqfw1sfnn0mo4_r2_250.jpg
250 px (W) x 350 px (H), 96 dpi, 51.7 kb (image)
1979/1980
retrieved on 2014-09-04 from http://38.media.tumblr.com/cace6ebffbc484224e3fe281421b0837/tumblr_n92trfhqfw1sfnn0mo4_r2_250.jpg

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square Press Folder

Posted on 30th March 2015 in "Times Square"
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At least that’s what it was called when I got it. It’s only a folder though in the sense that it’s folded, not that it contained something else like the press kits which have pockets to hold papers and photos. This is just a big piece of heavy glossy stock, folded over.


It’s not really a “press” folder, either. It looks like promotion to theater owners, to get them to book the film. I’m not an authority on film publicity; if you know a technical term for this kind of object, please leave a comment!

One thing is for sure, though — this was created, like the articles in my last few posts, before the advertising campaign had been designed. The outside is an extremely cool yet rather anonymous collage of Times Square by night, and most of the photos inside are not the ones used later for publicity. The background image is a collage of the collage with a photo that will turn up in black and white in the press kit. The last image at the bottom right is a cropped version of the one I talked about here, which got used a lot. The shot of the concert in Times Square and the close-up of Nicky will both later appear in the Songbook, I think. The close-up of Tim Curry looks like it was taken a second before or after the photo that was printed in black and white in The Aquarian and Prevue. The other pictures may be unique to this folder.

Ironically, the image of the girls with the “Times Square-42nd St.” sign superimposed over them was, as we’ve seen, taken on the corner of 8th Avenue and 50th Street.

The text… well, judge for yourself. It misspells Nicky’s name “Nikki.” Lots of people do that, sure, but, but, no. She spells her first name “Nicky.” The film isn’t even out yet, and it looks like someone may be worried she’s not girly enough.

ROBERT STIGWOOD
PRESENTS
TIMES SQUARE

AFD
Associated
Film Distribution

Robert Stigwood, whose multimedia touch produced such movie-record super hits as “Grease”… “Tommy”… “Saturday Night Fever”… and “Jesus Christ Superstar”… will now usher in a new wave of youthful excitement:
TIMES SQUARE

Set in the neon nerve center of young New York. Crammed with colorful, careening characters. Ablaze with the light of a million midnight suns. Tuned to a furious rock beat… amps up… full power on. The new wave. It’s called:
TIMES SQUARE

It’s about the most rollicking runaways since Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn. Pammy Pearl… bright… pretty… shy of love… from a Fifth Avenue penthouse overlooking the park. Nikki Marotta… tough… funny… hooked on dreams… from the mean streets of the east Village.

They’ve ridden a wild river called 42nd Street. Now, they’re hiding on the exciting, eccentric, busy dizzy, dangerous island that’s Times Square.

Half the city is hunting for them. The other half is cheering for them… to stay “lost.” The only one who knows their whereabouts is all-night disc jockey Johnny La Guardia, perched in a skyscraper studio, playing their song. And he won’t tell.

Because any moment now… Pammy and Nikki will reappear as the spectacular “Sleaze Sisters”… to stop traffic… live their dreams… and turn on the whole town.
TIMES SQUARE

It’s a dazzling youth-market-musical that will pack theatres this October… like TIMES SQUARE on New Year’s Eve.
Get in on the action…
TIMES SQUARE

©1980 Associated
Film Distribution

By popular demand (meaning Deb asked), here are close-ups of the inside pictures. Their actual size is pretty close to the thumbnails below, so the gallery will give a good view of the individual pixels.

 

 

“Robert Stigwood presents Times Square”
12 in (H) x 18 in (W) (folded) (work);
1080 px (W) x 718 px (H), 96 dpi, 525 kb (outside image)
1080 px (W) x 721 px (H), 96 dpi, 647 kb (inside image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Post edited on 4 April 2015 to add the detail image gallery.

The Last Word

Posted on 3rd March 2015 in "Times Square"
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The May 1980 issue of Photoplay mentioned Times Square’s production in Ken Johns’ Last Word column.

Edit from Photoplay's Last Word, Photoplay Vol. 31 No. 5, May 19
The image of Nicky singing “Damn Dog” in the Cleo Club was later published in at least one more magazine after the film’s release, but I haven’t yet seen it anywhere else, or in color.

This was the version of Photoplay published in the U.K. Times Square wouldn’t open there until the following January.

For the benefit of all the search spiders out there, here’s the relevant text:

Newcomer Robin Johnson stars in Times Square

The beautiful Trini Alvarado (from Rich Kids) gets the star role in Times Square, produced by Robert Stigwood and Jacob Brackman. Said Stigwood: “The film reflects the tragedy of grown-ups who cannot relate to kids, who view the world very differently. It is a tough raw film, but with lots of humour.” The film features a rock score written and played by many talented stars. Tim Curry stars in the movie as a dee-jay. The story concerns two young girls (Trini, and newcomer Robin Johnson) who meet in the ward of a psychiatric hospital and decide that the shrinks are crazier than they are and so go on the run. The DJ (Tim Curry) carries their exploits to the world via his all-night radio show…

Robert Stigwood is quoted. Allan Moyle isn’t mentioned. Hmm.

 

 

Photoplay Vol. 31 No. 5, May 1980, cover
8.5 in (W) x 11 in (H) (work)
800 px (H) x 627 px (W), 96 dpi, 435 kb (image)

 

Johns, Ken; “Photoplay’s LAST WORD Column”
Photoplay Vol. 31 No. 5, May 1980, p. 62
8.5 in (W) x 11 in (H) (work)
800 px (H) x 622 px (H), 96 dpi, 372 kb (image)

 

Edit of Photoplay Vol. 31 No. 5, May 1980, p. 62
(Johns, Ken; “Photoplay’s LAST WORD Column”)
1080 px (W) x 728 px (H), 96 dpi, 488 kb (image)

 

Photoplay ©1980 The Illustrated Publications Company Limited

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+