SONIDO – la revista musical, No. 56, June 1981

Posted on 12th July 2018 in "Times Square"
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on RedditPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone

Mexican pop music magazine featuring article on TIMES SQUARE.  Text:  NUMERO 56  $30 00  SONIDO 'a musical  ROD STEWART THREE SOULS BEATLES DANGEROUS RHYTHM  ¡¡¡LA NUEVA EXPLOSION DEL ROCK PESADO¡¡¡

 

 

 

 

The June 1981 issue of the Mexican pop music magazine Sonido contained on pages 38 and 39 an article credited to “Vicco,” but which seems to be exactly the same kind of AFD/RSO-written publicity published in English in similar magazines a year before.

The article calls the film Times Square. It wasn’t released under that title in Mexico, though, as we shall see.

The accompanying photos are the ubiquitous TS-72-8A/14, TS-66-28/9, and TS-82-30[/4], all three of which were part of the US Press Material pack.

POR: vicco

TIMES SQUARE es un drama contemporáneo,con música estelarizada por los talentos de Tim Curry, cantante y actor británico que se dio a conocer con El show de terror de Rocky; Trini Alvarado, quien tuvo un importante papel en la película de Robert Altman Rich kids, y Robin Johnson, una actriz proveniente de Brooklin, muy dinámica y que canta también en su debut cinematográfico.

La película fue filmada en diversas locaciones de Nueva York, incluyendo el infame Deuce y es resaltada por veinte canciones originales ejemplificando algo de lo mejor del rock contemporáneo interpretadas por los más importantes artistas del momento, así como por las dos estrellas de la cinta, Robin Johnson y Trini Alvarado.

Times square retrata las desventuras de dos chiquillas rebeldonas, una proveniente de un ambiente sofisticado y, la otra, producto de las calles. Juntas desde el cuarto de un hospital neurológico comienzan una serie de bizarras escapadas y su comportamiento es reportado por un disc-jockey que trabaja toda la noche en una estación de radio y que las anima a seguir con sus trucos y logra convertirlas en celebridades menores de los medios. Ellas pasan sobre todas las autoridades llegando al climax en una escena sobre la marquesina del teatro Times Square con cientos de seguidores rindiendo su tributo.

Dicha cinta es una presentación de Robert Stigwood y fue producida por Stigwood y Jacob Brackman, dirigida por Alan Moyle, basada en una historia de Moyle y Leanne Unger. Kevin McCormick y John Nicollela son los productores ejecutivos y Bill Oakes es productor asociado.

LA MUSICA
En un momento en que la música de películas se encuentra entre los discos más populares y cuando ha sido entendida como un vehículo muy importante para la aceptación de una cinta, aparece un nuevo álbum doble en discos RSO con la música de la película Times square, uno de los más excitantes que han sido lanzados, pues no sólo captura el espíritu de la película, sino que es además una antología única de canciones interpretadas por los mejores artistas de rock del momento, tanto de Inglaterra como de Estados Unidos, incluyendo a Suzi Qautro, The Pretenders, Roxy Music, Gary Numan, The Talking Heads, Joe Jackson, The Patti Smith Group, XTC, The Cure, Lou Reed,The Ramones, The Ruts, David Johansen y muchos otros. ¡Es un álbum espectacular!

v

BY: vicco

TIMES SQUARE is a contemporary drama, with music, starring the talents of Tim Curry, singer and British actor who became known in The Rocky Horror Picture Show; Trini Alvarado, who had an important role in Robert Altman’s movie Rich Kids, and Robin Johnson, an actress from Brooklyn, very dynamic and who also sings in her film début.

The movie was filmed in diverse locations of New York, including the infamous Deuce, and it is highlighted by twenty original songs exemplifying some of the best contemporary rock performed by today’s most important artists, as well as by both stars of the film, Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado.

Times Square portrays the misfortunes of two little girl rebels, one from a sophisticated environment and, the other one, a product of the streets. Together from the room of a neurological hospital they begin a series of bizarre escapades and their behavior is reported by a disc-jockey who works the overnight on a radio station and who encourages them to continue with their tricks and manages to turn them into minor media celebrities. They get past all the authorities, arriving at the climax in a scene on the marquee of the Times Square theatre with hundreds of followers paying tribute.

This film is a Robert Stigwood presentation and it was produced by Stigwood and Jacob Brackman, directed by Alan Moyle, based on a story by Moyle and Leanne Unger. Kevin McCormick and John Nicollela are the executive producers and Bill Oakes is the associate producer.

THE MUSIC

At a time when movie soundtracks are among the most popular records and when they have been understood as a very important vehicle for the acceptance of a film, a new double album appears on RSO Records with the music of the movie Times Square, one of the most exciting to be released, since it not only captures the spirit of the movie, but it is also a unique collection of songs performed by today’s greatest rock artists, from both England and the United States, including Suzi Qautro, The Pretenders, Roxy Music, Gary Numan, The Talking Heads, Joe Jackson, The Patti Smith Group, XTC, The Cure, Lou Reed, The Ramones, The Ruts, David Johansen and many others. It is a spectacular album!

v

 

 

vicco, “Cine-rock : Times Square” (article), AAT ID: 300048715)
SONIDO la revista musical, No. 56, June 1981, pp. 38-39 (magazine (periodical), AAT ID: 300215389)
20.2 (W) x 27.8 cm. (H), 64 pp (work);
Sonido, La Revista Musical Ano 1 Numero 56 Junio 1981 – 0001_1080px.jpg (cover)
1080 px (H) x 823 px (W), 96 dpi, 501 kb
Sonido, La Revista Musical Ano 1 Numero 56 Junio 1981_0037_1080px.jpg (p. 38)
1080 px (H) x 794 px (W), 96 dpi, 439 kb
Sonido, La Revista Musical Ano 1 Numero 56 Junio 1981_0038_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 804 px (W), 96 dpi, 466 kb (images)
 
SONIDO la revista musical ©1981 Corporación Editorial, S.A.

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

UK Promo Photos 4, 13, and 21, 1980-81

Posted on 25th May 2018 in "Times Square"
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on RedditPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone

Typically, shortly before my last post was published (but weeks after I’d initially written it), five more stills from the UK series turned up. Two were duplicates of numbers 20 and 29, but the others were new to me. They follow the series’ general conventions of being black and white 8×10″s with no border, a handwritten number on a tiny square inset along the bottom edge, and a paper strip taped to the back with a typed caption.

This first one I’d been passing up for maybe nearly a year, since Robin isn’t in it and it’s essentially a duplicate of TS-117-13/15, although less cropped, but I picked it up along with these others when I realized it was might be part of this series.

 One of a series of black and white 8x10" photos distributed in the UK in 1981 to promote TIMES SQUARE (1980).  The caption taped to the back is likely the caption from a different photo in the series:  Robin Johnson is a runaway teenage product of the streets who dreams of becoming a rock music star and lets nothing get in her way to make it to the top in"TIMES SQUARE".  "TIMES SQUARE" a contemporary drama with music starring Tim Curry, Robin Johnson and Trini Alverado, is a Robert Stigwood Presentation, produced by Stigwood and Jacob Brackman and directed by Alan Moyle from Brackman's screenplay, based on the story by Moyle and Leanne Unger, with Kevin McCormick and John Nicollela the executive producers and Bill Oakes the associate producer. "TIMES SQUARE" is distributed by Columbia-EMI-Warner.

I have some doubts over whether it truly belongs in this series, though, first because the caption sheet taped to the back seems to belong to a different photo, and doesn’t have the photo number on it:

Robin Johnson is a runaway teenage product of the streets who dreams of becoming a rock music star and lets nothing get in her way to make it to the top in “TIMES SQUARE”.
“TIMES SQUARE” a contemporary drama with music starring Tim Curry, Robin Johnson and Trini Alverado, is a Robert Stigwood Presentation, produced by Stigwood and Jacob Brackman and directed by Alan Moyle from Brackman’s screenplay, based on the story by Moyle and Leanne Unger, with Kevin McCormick and John Nicollela the executive producers and Bill Oakes the associate producer. “TIMES SQUARE” is distributed by Columbia-EMI-Warner.

Robin’s not in the photo, Trini’s name is spelled wrong, and the film distributors’ names are separated by dashes instead of slashes. In fact, the caption is identical to the one on the caption sheet attached to this photo of Robin from the US Press Material folder, except for the typos and the addition of the UK film distributors. The strangest thing is, though, I already have a photo #4 from this series, and it’s of Tim Curry. Both these photos are unmistakably labeled “4”. I’m keeping them both until I find out if one or the other doesn’t belong. I suspect this is the one that should be categorized somewhere else.

The other two are definitely part of this series:

#13 appeared in Photoplay Vol 32 No 1, January 1981, and in the Japanese souvenir program book. A copy of this photo is probably the source of those images.

#29 looks to have been taken within seconds of a shot that appeared cropped in the center of Japanese program book and on a lobby card I don’t have (but Karen Dean [DefeatedandGifted] does), and this color shot. Like that last one, this photo as far as I know was never published and may be making its first public appearance here. It’s probably safe to say that any shot of the performance of “Damn Dog” in the Cleo Club, like the 35mm slide, was taken at the same run-through as this one. None of these shots are of the performance given for the take in the film, even allowing for a different placement of the still and movie cameras.

I promised in the last post, which went up twelve days before this one but was written two months before, that I’d post a collection of all the photos I have from this series once I had fifteen of them, and I now have sixteen, counting both number 4s. So, that will be the next post.

Previous posts referenced above:

Times Square Press Material folder (post 3 of 5)
Times Square Press Material folder (post 4 of 5)
Times Square UK Press Kit (post 2 of 4)
Photoplay Vol 32 No 1, January 1981
Times Square Program Book, Japan, June 1981 (post 1 of 5)
Times Square Program Book, Japan, June 1981, pages 12-13 (post 5 of 5)
“Damn Dog”
Aggie Doon

 

 

Times Square publicity still 4 [2nd version]
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347
UK ; 20.3 x 25.4 cm. (work)
Times_Square_UK_publicity_still_4_auto_1080px.jpg
864 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 368 kb (image)

Times Square publicity still 13
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347
UK ; 20.3 x 25.4 cm. (work)
Times_Square_UK_publicity_still_13_manual_1080px.jpg
864 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 423 kb (image)

Times Square publicity still 21
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347
UK ; 20.3 x 25.4 cm. (work)
Times_Square_UK_publicity_still_21_auto_1080px.jpg
866 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 432 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

UK Promo Photos 20 and 26, 1980-81

Posted on 13th May 2018 in "Times Square"
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on RedditPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone

Times Square 8 x 10″ publicity stills from this series continue to turn up. The first ones I found, I didn’t realize where they had come from, but the UK Press Kit’s caption sheet that matched up with some of the numbers on the photos solved the mystery. Their distinguishing characteristic is a small handwritten identification number in a tiny inset square along the bottom edge. Some have “TIMES SQUARE” stamped on the back. These have captions typed on a strip of paper pasted to their backs.

Photo 20 is the most-used publicity still from the movie, with the exceptions of the headshots of Trini and Robin that were used for the North American movie poster and the soundtrack album cover. I listed its various appearances when it showed up in Film Review Vol. 31 No. 1. Not in that list is photoplay Vol. 32 No. 4, where it also appeared, three months later. This specific version, numbered 20, was used as half of one of the two-photos-on-one-print 8×10’s that had Robert Stigwood’s name misspelled. It would make sense if the other three of those images were part of this series, especially since the caption for this one is identical on both versions, but I can’t see any numbers on the others.

Photo 26 is making its first and only (as far as I know at the moment) appearance here. It was part of the UK series of stills, but not used in any other country, and never published in any magazine or newspaper. (That I’ve yet found, at least.) It was evidently taken at the same time as the shot of Johnny and Pammy used on the Italian lobby poster, which will also later be a German lobby card.

The captions pasted to the photo backs both include the text “A scene from “TIMES SQUARE” distributed by COLUMBIA/EMI/WARNER Film Distributors”, Columbia/EMI/Warner being the film’s distributor in the UK.

The highest number photo in this series I’ve yet found is 36. I have thirteen of them. If I get an even 15 I’ll put up a gallery of just them. Till then, you can see them in these posts:

Times Square UK Press Kit (post 2 of 4)
Times Square UK Press Kit (post 3 of 4)
“6”
the page you’re reading right now
UK Promo Photo #29
“34”
Nicky Marotta, 1980

 

[In the two months that elapsed between my writing this page and my writing this note, shortly before this post is scheduled to be published, I did indeed acquire two more pictures from this series, plus one more that looks like it belongs but has the same number as another photo… so they will go up as soon as I can get them ready, followed by a post showing them all at once.]

 

 

Times Square publicity still 20
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347
UK ; 20.3 x 25.4 cm. (work)
Times_Square_UK_promo_photo_20_manual_2_1080px.jpg
866 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 397 kb (image)
Times_Square_UK_promo_photo_20_back_1080px.jpg
858 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 92.7 kb (image)

 
Times Square publicity still 26
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347
UK ; 20.3 x 25.4 cm. (work)
Times_Square_UK_promo_photo_26_auto_1080px.jpg
865 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 332 kb (image)
Times_Square_UK_promo_photo_26_back_1080px.jpg
855 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 108 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Blast from the Past

Posted on 19th April 2018 in "Times Square"
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on RedditPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone

Nicky Marotta (Robin Johnson) in costume for the final concert in TIMES SQUARE (1980)  Text (handwritten on back):  TIMES SQUARE

I got this photo at the same time as the Nicky hair and make up test and the preparing-to-shoot-the-excised-scene-of-the-girls-looking-for-Nicky’s-father. Somehow, in my excitement over those two true behind-the-scenes photographs, since there are so very few of those, I lost track of this one. I’d digitized it at the same time, but never prepared the file for uploading, or even made a proper note of its existence. I came across it again by accident while trying to identify the illustrations in the Japanese souvenir program book.

So here it is. Nicky, in costume and make up for the final concert. As of this writing I don’t believe this was ever published anywhere, like the two photos linked above that came with it. I would guess it was rejected for use as a publicity still in favor of TS-42-11A/2, and they both were taken at the same time as the slide.

The other two photos, which like this one are the full 35mm frame printed on 8 x 10 inch paper, resulting in the extra wide border along the long sides, have identifying numbers handwritten on the back. The one with the director and assistant director visible has a handwritten number (68-24A) that matches the format of the numbers printed on all the American publicity stills. Could these have been photos used by the production itself, and not as publicity materials? This particular photo has on its back only the handwritten words, “TIMES SQUARE”.

 

The photos referenced above are from these posts:

Nicky hair and make up test
Behind the scenes on location
Press photo TS-42-11A/2
Nicky Marotta 35mm color slide

 

 

[Robin Johnson as Nicky in costume for the final concert]
black-and-white photograph, AAT ID: 300128347
US ; 20.3 x 25.4 cm. (work)
Robin_Johnson_Times_Square_Behind_the_Scenes_photo_2_of_3_1080px.jpg
878 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 327 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square Program Book, Japan, June 1981, pages 12-13 (post 5 of 5)

Posted on 7th April 2018 in "Times Square"
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on RedditPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone

1981 Japanese program book for TIMES SQUARE (1980), center spread (pp. 12-13)

The center two pages of the Japanese souvenir book feature, alongside a somewhat out of place Yankees logo, three beautifully reproduced photos.

The first, of Pammy and Nicky atop the Times Square Theater marquee, isn’t a frame from the film, and I haven’t yet found it as a publicity still, so it would seem to be making its first and possibly only appearance here.

The inset of Nicky singing in the Cleo Club looks like it was taken just before or after this publicity still (discussed here). This will turn up again later on the Mexican movie poster.

And the last shot: in the film we don’t see see Nicky’s face and the knife on her wrist in the same shot. This photo would seem to have been taken between AFD publicity still TS-109-16/12, which appeared in the US Press Material pack in 1980, and TS-81/34 from 1981, which I don’t have, but Karen Dean (DefeatedandGifted) does, along with several other Items I haven’t got. (Actually I’m fairly certain I do have a version of TS-81/34, but not as an AFD print, but consarn it I can’t seem to find it.)

This last shot would also seem to be making its first and only appearance, and isn’t it beautiful? I don’t know if it comes across in my digitization, but something about the lighting and quality of the printing make it look almost like a painting.

Incidentally, I just noticed that TS-C-34/29 in Karen’s collection is the same photo as the one that accompanied the film review in Playboy Vol. 28 No. 1 from January 1981, which until this moment I thought had only ever appeared there. Now I suspect that the “C” that appears in some of the AFD press photo code numbers means that there’s also a color version somewhere.

I also came across a photo I’d gotten several years ago and totally overlooked while preparing items for this blog. I think it’s a rejected publicity photo, the only one of three shots taken within seconds of each other not to see the light of day… until next time.

 

Times Square program book, pp. 12-13
Japan : souvenir program : AAT ID: 300253341 : 29.4 x 20.5 cm. : 1981 (work);

Press Book Japan 1981_12-13_1080px.jpg
1080 x 1486 px, 96 dpi, 762 kb (image)

©1980 Butterfly Valley N. V.
 
Times Square©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square Program Book, Japan, June 1981, pages 20-24 (post 4 of 5)

Posted on 26th March 2018 in "Times Square"
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on RedditPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone
“Let’s get together at … Hippy Power” (?)

1981 Japanese program book for TIMES SQUARE (1980), p. 21

 

 

 

Here at the end of the Japanese program book, we get the movie’s credits, an ad for the soundtrack album, and… the Times Square Top Ten? I can only imagine what’s being said, in relation to the film, about Make-Up, Music, Fashion, Life Style, Play, Foods, Dream, Sports, Sex, and Friendship. Okay, Music and Friendship I get, but Sports?

 

Page 21, bearing a “Hippy Power” button and the unfinished caption, “Let’s get together at,” features two shots that are neither frames from the film, nor are publicity stills I’ve yet come across. The shot atop the marquee bears a strong resemblance to this color still, and is probably another still shot at that same time, and the shot of the girls entering the abandoned pier is from an entirely different angle than the scene in the film. Also, neither Nicky nor especially Pammy smiles during that sequence in the film. The point being, this is the only place these pictures appear, as far I know.

 

 

I don’t know if the street photo that is the background of page 20 has anything to do the film, other than being New York City. The inset photo of Nicky is from the shot used on one of the Italian lobby posters. Accompanying the credits on page 22, the shot of Pammy and Nicky erupting onto the street after the chase through the Adonis Theater is I believe making its first appearance here; it will later be a press photo distributed in Germany. The other two photos are frames from the film but with more image visible at the tops and bottoms, which as I mentioned last time lead me to believe that these were taken from a full-frame exposure that was matted for release, and may still exist as a TV print.

Page 23 features the soundtrack album cover, the Japanese “Same Old Scene” single picture sleeve, and, clockwise from top right: a shot of Robin and Trini between takes that had previously appeared in Movie 81 No. 2; the image from the cover of the “Same Old Scene” single, which had also appeared in the soundtrack gatefold, the songbook, and the aforementioned Movie 81 No. 2; a shot of Johnny that had been a UK lobby card and an illustration in Movie 81 No.2; and guess where the shot of Robin had appeared previously? Of course! It was in Film Review Vol. 31 No. 1.

And that perfect image on the back cover is a detail from another publicity still that will appear later as a German lobby card.

 

 

Times Square program book, pp. 20-24
Japan : souvenir program : AAT ID: 300253341 : 29.4 x 20.5 cm. : 1981 (work);

Press Book Japan 1981_20_1080px.jpg
Press Book Japan 1981_21_1080px.jpg
Press Book Japan 1981_22_1080px.jpg
Press Book Japan 1981_23_1080px.jpg
Press Book Japan 1981_24_1080px.jpg
96 dpi (images)

©1980 Butterfly Valley N. V.
 
vlcsnap-2018-01-28-14h01m30s878_1080px.jpg
vlcsnap-2018-01-28-14h07m05s115_1080px.jpg
608 x 1080px, 96dpi (contrast-adjusted frame captures from Times Square (1980))
Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

The U.S. Movie Poster

Posted on 7th July 2015 in "Times Square"
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on RedditPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone

The "Times Square" US movie poster.  Text:  In the heart of Times Square a poor girl becomes famous, a rich girl becomes courageous and both become friends. TIMES SQUARE ROBERT STIGWOOD Presents "TIMES SQUARE" Starring TIM CURRY ● TRINI ALVARADO  And Introducing ROBIN JOHNSON Also Starring PETER COFFIELD ● HERBERT BERGHOF ● DAVID MARGULIES ● ANNA MARIA  HORSFORD Executive Producers KEVIN McCORMICK ● JOHN NICOLELLA Directed by ALAN MOYLE Screenplay by JACOB BRACKMAN Story by ALAN MOYLE and LEANNE UNGER Produced by ROBERT STIGWOOD and JACOB BRACKMAN Associate Producer BILL OAKES An EMI Release Distributed in the U.S. and Canada By AFD (Associated Film Distribution) R RESTRICTED UNDER 17 REQUIRES ACCOMPANYING PARENT OR ADULT GUARDIAN Soundtrack available on RSO Records and Tapes AFD T.M.   ©1980 Associated Film Distribution RSO TM Records, Inc. 262 GAU GRAPHIC ARTS INTERNATIONAL UNION OFFICIAL UNION LABEL 796 PRINTED IN U.S.A. Property of National Screen Service Corporation. Licensed for use only in connection  with the exhibition of this picture at the theatre licensing this material. Licensee  agrees not to trade, sell or give it away, or permit others to use it, nor shall  licensee be entitled to any credit upon return of this material. This material  either must be returned or destroyed immediately after use. 800099
The final design for the movie poster retains the two overlapping askew rectangles from the poster side of the double-sided poster. That poster had a black rectangle over a purple rectangle over a red background; here it’s changed to yellow over blue over white. The colorized collage of Nicky and Pammy remains, but Pammy’s head has been lowered in relation to Nicky’s, and Nicky’s right shoulder and arm have been removed, and her collar shortened, to make room. The button with Johnny’s face has been placed on Nicky’s left lapel. It’s the same colorization job, with Nicky’s blue eyes and a ton of eye shadow, although there’s less contrast and there isn’t as much detail in the hair.

The round splotch of vivid fuschia with its outer drops turning to musical notes (which started as a cloud of red-orange smoke with its outer edges turning to notes) is now a streak of red paint whose splatters are just splatters.

The logo is exactly the same, just a little faded-looking in comparison because of the lowered contrast.

The tagline, “In the heart of Times Square a poor girl becomes famous, a rich girl becomes courageous and both become friends,” … well, they had to say something. It seems momentous until you start to think about what it actually says. It is literally what happens, but it’s not exactly what the movie is about.

Finally, the fantastic strips of DYMO label tape from the double-sided poster have become a clear italic sans-serif font on strips of fuschia (gotta have that fuschia somewhere). It looks great if you don’t have the original idea to compare it with. They sacrificed the design for the sake of clarity (it is easier to read), which is always the way, and is usually the right decision. Although… it is a watering down of the marketing towards a New Wave audience, to market the film more to a mass audience, and in hindsight we all know how well that worked.

 

 

“Times Square” Full Color One-Sheet Poster 800099
color, 27 in (W) x 41 in (H) (work);
706 px (W) x 1080 px (H), 96 dpi, 432 kb (image)

1980
inscription:
In the heart of Times Square
a poor girl becomes famous,
a rich girl becomes courageous
and both become friends.
TIMES SQUARE
ROBERT STIGWOOD Presents “TIMES SQUARE”
Starring TIM CURRY ● TRINI ALVARADO
And Introducing ROBIN JOHNSON
Also Starring PETER COFFIELD ● HERBERT BERGHOF ● DAVID MARGULIES ● ANNA MARIA HORSFORD
Executive Producers KEVIN McCORMICK ● JOHN NICOLELLA
Directed by ALAN MOYLE
Screenplay by JACOB BRACKMAN
Story by ALAN MOYLE and LEANNE UNGER
Produced by ROBERT STIGWOOD and JACOB BRACKMAN
Associate Producer BILL OAKES
An EMI Release Distributed in the U.S. and Canada
By AFD (Associated Film Distribution)
R RESTRICTED
UNDER 17 REQUIRES ACCOMPANYING PARENT OR ADULT GUARDIAN
Soundtrack available on RSO Records and Tapes
AFD T.M.
©1980 Associated Film Distribution
RSO TM Records, Inc.
262 GAU GRAPHIC ARTS INTERNATIONAL UNION OFFICIAL UNION LABEL 796
PRINTED IN U.S.A.
Property of National Screen Service Corporation. Licensed for use only in connection
with the exhibition of this picture at the theatre licensing this material. Licensee
agrees not to trade, sell or give it away, or permit others to use it, nor shall
licensee be entitled to any credit upon return of this material. This material
either must be returned or destroyed immediately after use.
800099

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square Press Material folder (post 3 of 5)

Posted on 14th May 2015 in "Times Square"
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on RedditPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone
“… in one of those inexplicable chance occasions, out of the blue, Robin Johnson appeared…”

 

Four more stills from the Times Square U.S. press kit.

Publicity still of Trini Alvarado and Peter Coffield from the "Times Square" US Press Materials folder.  Text:  (on image) TS-117-13/15 (on border) TIMES SQUARE AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution

TS-117-13
Trini Alvarado stars as the troubled daughter of an ambitious New York politician, played by Peter Coffield, and his lack of attention turns her into a rebellious runaway in “Times Square.”

Publicity still of Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado in the "hideout" in Pier 56 from the "Times Square" US Press Materials folder.   Text:  TS-94-10A/13 TIMES SQUARE AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution

TS-94-10A
Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado co-star as two runaway teenagers in New York who create their own bohemian life style in a revolt against authority in Times Square.

Publicity still of Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado on the northwest corner of 50th Street and 8th Avenue, from the "Times Square" US Press Materials folder.   Text:  TS-61-14/10 TIMES SQUARE AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution

TS-61-14
Trini Alvarado as Pamela Pearl and Robin Johnson as Nicky Marotta become minor media celebrities when their bizarre runaway escapades are reported on radio by an all-night disc jockey in “Times Square.”

Publicity still of Robin Johnson, Trini Alvarado, and Miguel Pinero in the Cleo Club, from the "Times Square" US Press Materials folder.  Text:  (on image) TS-104-17A/7  (on border) TIMES SQUARE AFD ©1980 Associated Film Distribution

TS-104-17A
Trini Alvarado is a novice dancer on the runway of a sleazy Times Square nitery but keeps the job as a teenage attraction with the encouragement of her fellow runaway, played by Robin Johnson (lower left), in “Times Square.”

I don’t really have anything to say about these, but when have I let that stop me.

It means nothing, but I notice in the first pic, Pammy’s dad is on the right, looking down at her, and in the rest, Nicky is to the left and is looking up at Pammy (or would be if her head was turned; her eye level is below Pam’s). This is just an artifact of the four pictures I happened to post here, but, still…

The second pic: Robin sure rocked that Union suit, huh?

The third pic: this is another shot from the girls’ escape from the plainclothes cop in the Adonis Theater, as they’re about to descend into the subway at 50th Street and 8th Avenue. There’s a screengrab of this shot towards the bottom of this post and another photo from this scene is the third image in the gallery of close-ups in this post, in a collage with images of Times Square (the street).

The fourth pic of Pammy’s dancing debut is from the session that produced this. There’s yet another shot that will be used on a UK lobby card.

As usual, none of these are the actual shots from the film.

To punch up the Robin content in this post, here are the first five pages of the eight-page “Production Information” text packet. (Robin isn’t mentioned on the last three pages.)

The Robin stuff reads as follows. For the rest, you’re on your own, unless I get requests from the audience. (That’s you.)

TIMES
SQUARE

PRODUCTION INFORMATION

About The Motion Picture…

“Times Square” bursts on the screen with the earthy exuberance of the famed New York City crossroads, itself, and depicts the energy and antics of adolescents imbibing the heady rush of rebellion. It is set to the sound of today’s most outstanding rock music and showcases the excitement of three vividly strong performances–the transformation of an inhibited, awkward teener, done to perfection by Trini Alvarado; the radiance and effervescence of a new discovery in 16-year-old Robin Johnson, and an image-breaking character study of a disc-jockey on-the-edge by Tim Curry.

A contemporary drama that focuses on two teenage girls from opposite sides of the economic scale, “Times Square” needed two strong, young talents to work effectively as a film. Director Moyle was convinced that his leads would have to be found outside the normal casting pools and talent stables.

“I wanted two girls who were those characters,” he affirmed. “We sent out flyers, took ads in the Village Voice, Soho News, Aquarian, and contacted record stores and half-way homes. We scouted every rock dive, every disco, every club we could find.”

The final result of the massive search saw professionally trained Trini Alvarado cast as Pamela, the shy and inhibited only child of a successful politician, a widower who forgets his daughter amid the demands of his career. Trini had just won rave reviews for a stunning performance in her first film, Robert Altman’s “Rich Kids.”

For the demanding central role of Nicky an abandoned youngster reared in foster homes and the school of tough times, Moyle intended to cast an established, slightly older actress. But, in one of those inexplicable chance occasions, out of the blue, Robin Johnson appeared. She had been given the casting director’s number while standing on the steps of her high school in Brooklyn. An exceptionally bright, well-adjusted student, Robin certainly didn’t fit Moyle’s preconceived notions of what his Nicky was going to be. But with her raspy, husky Brooklyn style of vocalizing, a quick-witted sense of humor and a total lack of pretense, she stunned and charmed not only the director but producer Robert Stigwood as well. “Robin brought a great deal of warmth and an incredible amount of native humor to Nicky,” Moyle says admiringly.

About The Cast…

ROBIN JOHNSON, who makes her film debut as the explosive Nicky Marotta, was discovered outside her high school, Brooklyn Tech. That chance happening concluded a five-month nationwide talent hunt to find the dynamic, young singing actress for the demanding role. Robin had never acted previously. The 16-year-old New Yorker lives at home with her mother and a sister, Cindy. Her audition, both singing and reading script, overwhelmed everyone within hearing. Robin Johnson was Nicky Marotta.

I believe this is the first time the story of Robin’s “discovery” is told. It will quickly become one of the major selling points for the film.

 

 

TS-117-13/15
1080 px (W) x 868 px (H), 96 dpi, 277 kb (image)
TS-94-10A/13
1080 px (H) x 855 px (W), 96 dpi, 328 kb (image)
TS-61-14/10
1080 px (W) x 859 px (H), 96 dpi, 323 kb (image)
TS-104-17A/7
1080 px (W) x 862 px (H), 96 dpi, 310 kb (image)
black and white photographic prints, 8 in (H) x 10 in (W) (works);

1980
inscriptions: [on photos] TS-117-13/15; TS-94-10A/13; TS-61-14/10; TS-104-17A/7;
(on borders) TIMES SQUARE
AFD
©1980 Associated
Film Distribution

 

TIMES SQUARE PRODUCTION INFORMATION, pp. 1-5
8.5 in (W) x 11 in (H) (works);
1080 px (H) x 838 px (W), 96 dpi, 271 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 838 px (W), 96 dpi, 376 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 835 px (W), 96 dpi, 482 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 835 px (W), 96 dpi, 354 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 836 px (W), 96 dpi, 356 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Odds and Ends

Posted on 8th April 2015 in "Times Square"
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on RedditPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone

Before moving on, I mentioned some time ago some pictures I’ve only seen on the Web and not found any physical copies of. So, here they are. Some of them anyway.

I’d found a bunch of these at Cineplex, having been digitized by Baseline Research, but as I was assembling this post I found that about half of them were taken from a set of 1981 UK lobby cards. Since they’re all the same size, that would lead me to suspect that there are more lobby cards that I haven’t found yet. (There also seem to be two entirely different sets of UK lobby cards, but I’m getting ahead of myself.) But without knowing for sure, these are just free-floating publicity stills with no provenance before being scanned in 2010, and I’m putting them here.

I posted these first two awhile back, on November 6, 2014:
o-TIMES-900 M8DTISQ EC001

The first was used to promote the May 21, 2014 screening of Times Square at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. I’d never seen it before. The second is the most complete version of that image I’ve seen, and it turns out to have been a UK lobby card. (I’ll post the lobby cards when Times Square opens in England. Right now, they’re still trying to put the soundtrack and US ad campaign together.)

 

MSDTISQ EC002
 
This one was also printed in black and white by Associated Film Distribution in the format of the photos used in the US press kit.

You can see it here at DefeatedandGifted’s “Times Square Fandom” blog, along with 3 other photos I don’t have. Strangely, those photos are copyrighted 1981 by AFD, and as far as I know AFD wasn’t promoting the film after it closed in the US in November 1980. They certainly weren’t included in the US Press Materials folder. Back to this particluar image, it’s the other shot that shows some behind-the-scenes action that I mentioned here: you can see a crowd of kids behind a barricade watching the filming.
 

TIMES SQUARE, Trini Alvarado, Robin Johnson, 1980

 

 

 

 

This one was used many times, but this version shows more of the background than any other I’ve seen.

 

TIMES SQUARE, Trini Alvarado, Robin Johnson, 1980

 
 

Both Trini and Robin just look so angelic here. I love it.

 
And, look closely at Nicky’s guitar. Compare it to the picture above. This photo was taken before they taped over the word “Rickenbacker” on the headstock. There are a few publicity stills where the guitar’s make is visible, just like there are quite a few of Robin holding a Kent with its big distinctive “K,” but in the film the guitar brands are both blacked out.

 

 
And, finally,
TIMES SQUARE, 1980. (c) Associated Film.
Robin Johnson, "Times Square"

 

 

 

 
If I come across physical copies of any of these in the future, you’ll be the first to know.

 

 

Times Square (1980) directed by Allan Moyle shown: Robin Johnson, Trini Alvarado (o-TIMES-900-300×199.jpg)
900 px (W) x 598 px (H), 300 dpi, 140 KB (image)
1979/1980
retrieved on 2014-05-01 from Brooks, Katherine. “12 Films That Pay Homage To Punk Rock Girls.” The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, Inc., 1 May 2014.

 

TIMES SQUARE, from left, Robin Johnson, Trini Alvarado, 1980, ©Associated Film . (86548_full.jpg)
1000 px (W) x 685 px (H), 300 dpi, 98.4 KB (image)
1979/1980
retrieved on 2014-10-22 from “Times Square.” Cineplex. Cineplex Entertainment LP, n.d.

 

MSDTISQ EC002 (262141_full.jpg)
1000 px (W) x 664 px (H), 300 dpi, 113 KB (image)
MSDTISQ EC001 (262140_full.jpg)
1000 px (W) x 667 px (H), 300 dpi, 83.3 KB (image)
MSDTISQ EC003 (262142_full.jpg)
1000 px (W) x 673 px (H), 300 dpi, 79.4 KB (image)
MBDTISQ EC001 (102361_full.jpg)
808 px (W) x 1000 px (H), 300 dpi, 134 KB (image)
1979/1980
retrieved on 2014-10-25 from “Times Square.” Cineplex. Cineplex Entertainment LP, n.d.

 

tumblr_n92trfhqfw1sfnn0mo4_r2_250.jpg
250 px (W) x 350 px (H), 96 dpi, 51.7 kb (image)
1979/1980
retrieved on 2014-09-04 from http://38.media.tumblr.com/cace6ebffbc484224e3fe281421b0837/tumblr_n92trfhqfw1sfnn0mo4_r2_250.jpg

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square Press Folder

Posted on 30th March 2015 in "Times Square"
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on RedditPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone

At least that’s what it was called when I got it. It’s only a folder though in the sense that it’s folded, not that it contained something else like the press kits which have pockets to hold papers and photos. This is just a big piece of heavy glossy stock, folded over.


It’s not really a “press” folder, either. It looks like promotion to theater owners, to get them to book the film. I’m not an authority on film publicity; if you know a technical term for this kind of object, please leave a comment!

One thing is for sure, though — this was created, like the articles in my last few posts, before the advertising campaign had been designed. The outside is an extremely cool yet rather anonymous collage of Times Square by night, and most of the photos inside are not the ones used later for publicity. The background image is a collage of the collage with a photo that will turn up in black and white in the press kit. The last image at the bottom right is a cropped version of the one I talked about here, which got used a lot. The shot of the concert in Times Square and the close-up of Nicky will both later appear in the Songbook, I think. The close-up of Tim Curry looks like it was taken a second before or after the photo that was printed in black and white in The Aquarian and Prevue. The other pictures may be unique to this folder.

Ironically, the image of the girls with the “Times Square-42nd St.” sign superimposed over them was, as we’ve seen, taken on the corner of 8th Avenue and 50th Street.

The text… well, judge for yourself. It misspells Nicky’s name “Nikki.” Lots of people do that, sure, but, but, no. She spells her first name “Nicky.” The film isn’t even out yet, and it looks like someone may be worried she’s not girly enough.

ROBERT STIGWOOD
PRESENTS
TIMES SQUARE

AFD
Associated
Film Distribution

Robert Stigwood, whose multimedia touch produced such movie-record super hits as “Grease”… “Tommy”… “Saturday Night Fever”… and “Jesus Christ Superstar”… will now usher in a new wave of youthful excitement:
TIMES SQUARE

Set in the neon nerve center of young New York. Crammed with colorful, careening characters. Ablaze with the light of a million midnight suns. Tuned to a furious rock beat… amps up… full power on. The new wave. It’s called:
TIMES SQUARE

It’s about the most rollicking runaways since Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn. Pammy Pearl… bright… pretty… shy of love… from a Fifth Avenue penthouse overlooking the park. Nikki Marotta… tough… funny… hooked on dreams… from the mean streets of the east Village.

They’ve ridden a wild river called 42nd Street. Now, they’re hiding on the exciting, eccentric, busy dizzy, dangerous island that’s Times Square.

Half the city is hunting for them. The other half is cheering for them… to stay “lost.” The only one who knows their whereabouts is all-night disc jockey Johnny La Guardia, perched in a skyscraper studio, playing their song. And he won’t tell.

Because any moment now… Pammy and Nikki will reappear as the spectacular “Sleaze Sisters”… to stop traffic… live their dreams… and turn on the whole town.
TIMES SQUARE

It’s a dazzling youth-market-musical that will pack theatres this October… like TIMES SQUARE on New Year’s Eve.
Get in on the action…
TIMES SQUARE

©1980 Associated
Film Distribution

By popular demand (meaning Deb asked), here are close-ups of the inside pictures. Their actual size is pretty close to the thumbnails below, so the gallery will give a good view of the individual pixels.

 

 

“Robert Stigwood presents Times Square”
12 in (H) x 18 in (W) (folded) (work);
1080 px (W) x 718 px (H), 96 dpi, 525 kb (outside image)
1080 px (W) x 721 px (H), 96 dpi, 647 kb (inside image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Post edited on 4 April 2015 to add the detail image gallery.