Another Italian Times Square Lobby Poster

Posted on 10th November 2017 in "Times Square"
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Two images from the film TIMES SQUARE (1980); ((1) Robin Johnson (2) Tim Curry and Trini Alvarado) with accompanying text:  TIMES SQUARE ROBERT STIGWOOD presenta "TIMES SQUARE"con TIM CURRY • TRINI ALVARADO  e per la prima volta sullo schermo ROBIN JOHNSON con PETER COFFIELD • HERBERT BERGHOF • DAVID MARGULIES  ANNA MARIA HORSFORD  produttori esecutivi KEVIN McCORMICK e JOHN NICOLELLA  diretto da ALAN MOYLE  prodotto da ROBERT STIGWOOD e JACOB BRACKMAN  sceneggiatura di JACOB BRACKMAN  soggetto di ALAN MOYLE e LEANNE UNGER EMI  produttore associato BILL OAKES  una produzione EMI-ITC  Technicolor • STEREOFUTURSOUND  IDIF

This is exactly what the post title says: a second lobby poster from Italy. There may be more, but so far I’ve only come across two.

The text is exactly the same as the other one and the Italian movie poster. Robin as Nicky is on the left, in a photo taken during the shooting of the final sequence, which is I believe making its first published appearance on this poster. We’ll be seeing it a few more times; it’s possible those future items actually came out before this, but they’re all from the spring or summer of 1981.

And on the right, we see an adult man giving vodka to a thirteen-year-old-girl, but it’s okay: he’s not interested in her, he wants to know about her sixteen-year-old roommate. Um… yeah. Sure, there’s really both more and less going on in that scene than that implies, but, I think you’d have a pretty hard time getting that from script to screen nowadays.

 

 

Times Square lobby poster (1)
poster, AAT ID: 300027221
Italy ; 46.9 x 64.5 cm. (work)
Times Square 1981 Italy Lobby Poster 1_1080px.jpg
783 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 427 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Movie 81 No. 2, February 1981

Posted on 1st July 2017 in "Times Square"
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Australian movie magazine containing article about TIMES SQUARE (1980)

“There’s a hot new talent, Robin Johnson in Robert Stigwood’s Times Square…”

contents and editorial page of Australian movie magazine containing article about TIMES SQUARE (1980) relevant text: There's a hot new talent, Robin Johnson in Robert Stigwood's Times Square...

 

Times Square was still in theaters in London when the February Movie 81 came out in Australia and editor John Fraser made the above announcement.

Movie 81 No. 2, February 1981, pp. 14-15  Text:  TIMES SQUARE  AN APPRAISAL BY TERRY O BRIEN  Like the music which accompanies it on a pulsating soundtrack of rock, Times Square is a story of the streets. It’s about rebellion on a small scale, a search for some kind of basic freedom and a need to live life rather than simply exist. By setting the story in Times Square (surely the definitive microcosm of all that is good and bad in pre-packaged urban society), there’s a perfect, ready-made background of excitement, urgency and even danger that is inherent in that milieu. Surviving day to day in this environment is Nicky Marotta (Robin Johnson) a free spirit with aspirations of becoming a rock star. Her very wayward, uncompromising manner lands her in a psychiatric hospital for tests. While there, she meets Pamela Pearl (Trini Alvarado), a shy girl whose personality, unlike Nicky’s, has been submerged by her environment. She is, in fact, at quite the opposite end of the spectrum to Nicky. Moreover, Pamela’s father is a politician who has promised to clean up the seedier side of Times Square. The two girls escape from the hospital and, in their own way, take on the establishment with acts that supposedly symbolise their rejection of the plastic culture. Their exploits are covered and encouraged by Johnny LaGuardia (Tim Curry), a disc-jockey who turns the couple into celebrities with a following which allows Nicky, ultimately, a brief moment of fame as a rock singer. Another aspect of the story is the effect that each of the girls has on the other. Nicky’s life-style allows Pamela to experiment with her own and to break out of her protective shell. (It’s interesting that once she has had her freedom she decides to return to her father, though, one suspects, on her own terms.) Conversely, the poetic and sensitive Pamela brings about a change in Nicky who finds she has her first real friend and, subsequently, a basis for believing in herself. Robin Johnson, in her movie debut, is a sensation. Her Nicky is vibrant, exciting and fragile—and one of the most interesting movie characters in years. She is a find of the first order! Trini Alvarado is her perfect foil and willing pupil. Tim Curry’s eccentric exploitive disc-jockey is a far cry from his Frank N’ Furter in The Rocky Horror Picture Show, but is, again, a fascinating performance. The movie’s feeling of rebellion and non-acceptance of some of society’s values is reflected in the music—a constant background of rock by some of today’s more prominent performers. James A. Contner’s cameras have caught some spectacular shots of New York, especially from atop the building from which Johnny broadcasts. Times Square is a showcase for some new and little-seen talent.  Producers: Robert Stigwood Jacob Brackman Director: Allan Moyle  The neon nerve centre of young New York, tuned to a furious rock beat—amps up, full power on, with all-night disc jockey Johnny (Tim Curry) perched in his skyscraper studio waiting for the moment.

 

The two-page spread later in the issue is comprised of “An Appraisal by Terry O’Brien,” which from here in the 21st Century reads more like a promotional press release than a critical review. It is, though, an early adopter of the tone of most of the remaining publicity for Times Square, shifting its focus as hard as it can from the movie overall to Robin herself. “She is a find of the first order!”

The neon nerve centre of young New York, tuned to a furious rock beat—amps up, full power on, with all-night disc jockey Johnny (Tim Curry) perched in his skyscraper studio waiting for the moment.

TIMES SQUARE
AN APPRAISAL BY TERRY O BRIEN

Like the music which accompanies it on a pulsating soundtrack of rock, Times Square is a story of the streets. It’s about rebellion on a small scale, a search for some kind of basic freedom and a need to live life rather than simply exist. By setting the story in Times Square (surely the definitive microcosm of all that is good and bad in pre-packaged urban society), there’s a perfect, ready-made background of excitement, urgency and even danger that is inherent in that milieu. Surviving day to day in this environment is Nicky Marotta (Robin Johnson) a free spirit with aspirations of becoming a rock star. Her very wayward, uncompromising manner lands her in a psychiatric hospital for tests. While there, she meets Pamela Pearl (Trini Alvarado), a shy girl whose personality, unlike Nicky’s, has been submerged by her environment. She is, in fact, at quite the opposite end of the spectrum to Nicky. Moreover, Pamela’s father is a politician who has promised to clean up the seedier side of Times Square. The two girls escape from the hospital and, in their own way, take on the establishment with acts that supposedly symbolise their rejection of the plastic culture. Their exploits are covered and encouraged by Johnny LaGuardia (Tim Curry), a disc-jockey who turns the couple into celebrities with a following which allows Nicky, ultimately, a brief moment of fame as a rock singer. Another aspect of the story is the effect that each of the girls has on the other. Nicky’s life-style allows Pamela to experiment with her own and to break out of her protective shell. (It’s interesting that once she has had her freedom she decides to return to her father, though, one suspects, on her own terms.) Conversely, the poetic and sensitive Pamela brings about a change in Nicky who finds she has her first real friend and, subsequently, a basis for believing in herself. Robin Johnson, in her movie debut, is a sensation. Her Nicky is vibrant, exciting and fragile—and one of the most interesting movie characters in years. She is a find of the first order! Trini Alvarado is her perfect foil and willing pupil. Tim Curry’s eccentric exploitive disc-jockey is a far cry from his Frank N’ Furter in The Rocky Horror Picture Show, but is, again, a fascinating performance. The movie’s feeling of rebellion and non-acceptance of some of society’s values is reflected in the music—a constant background of rock by some of today’s more prominent performers. James A. Contner’s cameras have caught some spectacular shots of New York, especially from atop the building from which Johnny broadcasts. Times Square is a showcase for some new and little-seen talent.

Producers: Robert Stigwood
Jacob Brackman
Director: Allan Moyle

The real treasures here are the accompanying photographs. Within an assortment of publicity stills we’ve seen before are two more behind-the-scenes shots, one of Trini, Tim, and Robin on Pier 56 on the Hudson River, and one of Robin and Trini during the shooting of the concert in Times Square. The three-shot must come from the same break in shooting that produced the top photo on page 22 of Film Review, Vol. 31 No. 1, and the black and white photo in the UK Press Kit, and which I’ve noted before are among the very few photos from Times Square with the actors in costume smiling directly at the camera.

The shot of Robin and Trini probably was taken within moments of the slide of Robin in Aggie Doon makeup on 42nd Street; Nicky is only on that street in the makeup after she jumps from the marquee, and Pammy is never down there with her. This photo was taken either before, during a break in, or after filming.

The other photos are UK lobby cards (or suspected lobby cards), except the Yoram Kahana photograph from the session that also produced the shot that became half of the movie poster and soundtrack album cover, and the slide of Aggie Doon debuting Damn Dog, which I think is seeing its first publication here.

TIMES SQUARE movie advertisement from Movie 81 No. 2, February 1981, p. 47

 

 

 

 

And that’s not all! On page 47, we find an ad featuring for the first time the English South Pacific movie poster. The collaged artwork featuring a Mick Rock photo previously appeared in a production promotional ad in Screen International in June of 1980. Here we see the debut of the new tag line, “… is the music of the streets!” which still doesn’t exactly make sense, but is a step up from England’s “Go sleaze!”

 

 

 

 

 

But wait, there’s more! As a bonus, on pages 59, our friend Terry O’Brien gives the soundtrack a glowing review.

Soundtrack
TERRY O’BRIEN CHECKS OUT THE MOVIE MUSIC SCENE
TIMES SQUARE
Another double-album from the RSO stable and thus packaged for sure-fire entertainment. “Times Square” is “the music of the streets” and features some of the more familiar names of the New Wave. Suzi Quatro gets the set off with a blast on her “Rock Hard”—a gutsy number which happens to be the favourite of the film’s two young female leads played by Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado. Second up is The Pretenders’ “Talk of the Town” followed by a great Roxy Music number, “Same Old Scene”. The Bowie influence is much in evidence in Gary Numan’s haunting “Down in the Park”, and “Help Me!” has a good commercial sound from Marcy Levy and Robin Gibb. Other standouts are Lou Reed’s classic “Walk on the Wild Side” and a revival of “You Can’t Hurry Love” by D. L. Byron. You’ll also find some good rock from Talking Heads, Joe Jackson, XTC, The Ramones, The Ruts, Desmond Child & Rouge, Garland Jeffreys, The Cure and Patti Smith Group. Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado themselves are also featured on “Your Daughter is One” a nose-thumbing raspberry to society and “Damn Dog”, a solo by Johnson. A good collection.
TIMES SQUARE-RSO Records

 

 


Movie 81, No. 2, February 1981 (magazine (periodical), AAT ID: 300215389) ; 27.2 x 20 cm.; (contains:)
John Fraser, Editorial (editorial, AAT ID: 300026284), p. 3
Times Square : an appraisal by Terry O’Brien (review (document), AAT ID: 300026480), pp. 14-15
[Times Square is the music of the streets], (advertisement, AAT ID: 300193993), p. 47
Soundtrack : Terry O’Brien checks out the movie music scene : Times Square (review (document), AAT ID: 300026480), pp. 58-59 (work)
1981-02 Movie 81 No 2 cover_1080px.jpg
1080 x 794 px, 96 dpi, 535 kb
1981-02 Movie 81 No 2 p03_1080px.jpg
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1981-02 Movie 81 No 2 p03_detail_800px.jpg
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1981-02 Movie 81 No 2 p47_1080px.jpg
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1080 x 791 px, 96 dpi, 540 kb (images)

©1981 Modern Magazines (Holdings) Ltd.


 

 

Film Review, Vol. 31 No. 1, January 1981

Posted on 27th December 2016 in "Times Square"
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Cover of UK magazine containing feature artcle on "Times Square"

P. 3 (contents page) Relevant text: 22 TIMES SQUARE The adventures of two teenage girls (Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado) and the all-night Times Square radio personality (Tim Curry) who gives a boost to their dream of rock stardom.

22
TIMES SQUARE
The adventures of two teenage girls (Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado) and the all-night Times Square radio personality (Tim Curry) who gives a boost to their dream of rock stardom.

“With an off-beat beauty all her own, and an engaging rasping singing voice, Ms Johnson has enough female virility to fill many films yet, and is already pencilled in for the sequel to Grease.”

 

There’s no arguing with the fact that in January of 1981, the big movie in the UK was Flash Gordon.

 

Despite its title, Film Review didn’t contain an actual review of Times Square, but a promotional article. You can tell it’s not a review because it’s 100% positive.

 

Edit, 14 January 2017: After some consideration, I think this was actually a review, of sorts, and the author had seen the film before composing it. It’s a piece that appears in the next month’s issue of Film Review that’s an unabashed puff piece that might have been written by EMI’s publicity department. I still think this one was more promotion than review, though.

 

The first photo accompanying the article is worth the price of admission, though: a color shot of Robin, Trini, and Tim, taken at the same time as the black and white photo in the UK Press Kit. Also, to my knowledge the shot in the lower left corner, “Robin Johnson sings to her fans in her Sleaze Sisters apparel,” is making its first appearance. The remaining color photo was used as a lobby card, and the black and white photo on the following page is TS-72-8A/14 from the US Press Material Folder, which appeared in the AFD Campaign Pressbook, on the covers of the British and Japanese soundtrack sampler records, in US Magazine, in the Leader, and on one of the strange 2-photo 8x10s that misspelled Robert Stigwood’s name. So far, other than the portraits of Robin and Trini that were used on the soundtrack album cover and the US movie poster, this is the photo that most often helped promote the film.

The one thing the article has in common with most real reviews of the movie is that it ultimately focuses on Robin’s performance as the big reason to see it. It’s also the first mention of Robin’s next scheduled project, as the female lead in Robert Stigwood’s production of Grease 2. Remember that?

TIMES SQUARE

A thought-provoking tale of alienated teenages — their moods, their mad antics and their music

Two runaway teenage girls, a variety of New Wave rock music and a grimy, pristine backdrop of New York make up the ingredients of Times Square (an EMI release), Robert Stigwood’s latest offering to a youthful cinema-going public.

Robin Johnson, a spunky 15-year-old newcomer, plays with admirable bravado the central role of Nicky, a street urchin with destructive inclinations and a yen for musical stardom. In hospital for psychiatric tests, Nicky finds herself in the company of Pamela Pearl (played by Trini Alvarado — from Robert Altman’s Rich Kids), an introverted 12-year-old from a privileged background, also in for tests. Despite their opposing upbringings, the two run away together — from the System that oppresses them both — to lead an exuberant, retaliatory existence on the streets.

It is this slight story-line that makes up the canvas for a gritty but heart-warming story of today’s youth, their problems, their qualities, their understandable misgivings and denied intelligence. They make mistakes — like every young generation before them — but this breed is growing up faster than ever before.

Canadian director Alan Moyle, making his American film debut after a string of successful films and documentaries over the border, conjures up a realistic atmosphere to his scenes beyond the call of Hollywood duty — to the extent you sometimes feel you are watching the runaway duo for real.

Moyle cleverly intercuts his footage with shots of genuine Times Square coke snorters, back street alcoholics, Eighth Avenue prostitutes and pimps, and all the fun of the New York fair. For the climactic sequence he even managed to close 42nd Street’s “Deuce” (a notorious strip of theatres and porno cinemas) for the first time in New York film location history.

Between all this he concentrates his camera almost lovingly on the adventures of Johnson and Alvarado, who have meanwhile taken their anti-establishment hostilities one step further, adopting a dual identity and calling themselves The Sleaze Sisters Not without point!

Under this guise, wearing outrageous costumes pieced together from jumble outcasts and dustbin liners, they tear through the streets of New York begging for money, in their spare time levering tv sets — the ultimate symbol of the bourgeoisie — from the top storeys of Manhattan’s skyscrapers.

It is this singular prank that arouses the interest of the public, and in particular that of a late-night Times Square DJ, played with laid-back relish by England’s own Tim Curry, late of “The Rocky Horror Show”. Providing The Sleaze Sisters with even greater coverage on New York’s air waves, narrating their boardwalk escapades and even allowing them to sing their protests, DJ Johnny LaGuardia becomes the catalyst in Moyle’s story. Like the DJ Curry played on television in “City Sugar”, LaGuardia reaches out from the night to the receptive, confused soul of a young girl wanting, desiring an intimate liaison with an established anti-establishment voice. Here, Curry has two souls to contend with and, even though he is trying to help them and gain public sympathy (by this time the police are now hot on their trail), he is at the same time exploiting them, exploiting their isolation from society, the society which eventually they come to need.

So, Times Square turns out to be many things: an exciting, abrasive look at the uglier face of New York; a compassionate tale of two desperate runaways who find mutual friendship encountering a common enemy; and a musical featuring some of the finest New Wave sounds around, including contributions from The Pretenders, Lou Reed and Suzi Quatro.

But for all Moyle’s perspicacious and sensitive direction, it is young Robin Johnson’s performance that dominates the film. With an off-beat beauty all her own, and an engaging rasping singing voice, Ms Johnson has enough female virility to fill many films yet, and is already pencilled in for the sequel to Grease. □

Karen (DefeatedandGifted) posted her copy of these pages in March 2015.

 

 

Film Review, Vol. 31 No. 1, January 1981;
UK EMI Cinemas Ltd.;
magazine (periodical), AAT ID: 300215389; 29.8 cm (H) x 21.3 cm (W) (work);
1981-01 Film Review Vol 31 No 1 p01_1080px.jpg (cover)
1981-01 Film Review Vol 31 No 1 p03_1080px.jpg (contents)
1981-01 Film Review Vol 31 No 1 p22_1080px.jpg (“TIMES SQUARE”)
1981-01 Film Review Vol 31 No 1 p23_1080px.jpg (“TIMES SQUARE”)
1080 px (H), 96 dpi (images)

 

UK Movie Ad

Posted on 7th December 2016 in "Times Square"
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UK magazine ad for "Times Square", 1981 Text: TIMES SQUARE AA  "GO SLEAZE!" ...IN TIMES SQUARE  ROBERT STIGWOOD Presents "TIMES SQUARE"  Starring TIM CURRY·TRINI ALVARADO And Introducing ROBIN JOHNSON  Also Starring PETER COFFIELD·HERBERT BERGHOF DAVID MARGULIES·ANNA MARIA HORSFORD  Executive Producers KEVIN McCORMICK·JOHN NICOLELLA  Directed by ALAN MOYLE  Produced by ROBERT STIGWOOD and JACOB BRACKMAN Screenplay by JACOB BRACKMAN  Story by ALAN MOYLE and LEANNE UNGER  Associate Producer BILL OAKES An EMI-ITC Production  Soundtrack available on RSO Records and TAPES RSO  Released by COLUMBIA-EMI-WARNER Distributors Limited.  EMI  A Member of the THORN EMI Group. FROM THURS. 15 JAN. ABC  Shaftesbury Ave  Tel: 836 8861  Licensed Bar  DOLBY STEREO  STUDIO  OXFORD CIRCUS  Tel: 437 3300  DOLBY STEREO  SCENE LEICESTER SQ (WARDOUR ST)  Tel.439.4470  ABC  BAYSWATER  DOLBY STEREO  ABC  EDGWARE RD.  ABC  FULHAM RD.

 

This ad promoting the movie’s opening has the same art as the one published previously in the Leader, but with the addition of the theaters it will be in. It’s essentially a black-and-white version of the quad poster, the top half of the painting by Cummins.

It appeared in a film magazine, but I don’t know which one. It’s on heavy magazine stock, not newsprint, and on the back is an ad for Seems Like Old Times, but unfortunately the portion of the page I have doesn’t have the name of the magazine or the page number.

 

 

[“Times Square” UK movie advertisement]
advertisement, ID: 300193993, 20 cm (W) x 14.3 cm (H) (work);
1080 px (W) x 768 px (H), 96 dpi, 434 kb (image)

1981
Inscription:
TIMES SQUARE AA
"GO SLEAZE!" …IN TIMES SQUARE
ROBERT STIGWOOD Presents "TIMES SQUARE"
Starring TIM CURRY·TRINI ALVARADO And Introducing ROBIN JOHNSON
Also Starring PETER COFFIELD·HERBERT BERGHOF
DAVID MARGULIES·ANNA MARIA HORSFORD
Executive Producers KEVIN McCORMICK·JOHN NICOLELLA
Directed by ALAN MOYLE
Produced by ROBERT STIGWOOD and JACOB BRACKMAN
Screenplay by JACOB BRACKMAN
Story by ALAN MOYLE and LEANNE UNGER
Associate Producer BILL OAKES An EMI-ITC Production
Soundtrack available on RSO Records and TAPES RSO
Released by COLUMBIA-EMI-WARNER Distributors Limited.
EMI
A Member of the THORN EMI Group.
FROM THURS. 15 JAN.
ABC
Shaftesbury Ave
Tel: 836 8861
Licensed Bar
DOLBY STEREO
STUDIO
OXFORD CIRCUS
Tel: 437 3300
DOLBY STEREO
SCENE LEICESTER SQ (WARDOUR ST)
Tel.439.4470
ABC
BAYSWATER
DOLBY STEREO
ABC
EDGWARE RD.
ABC
FULHAM RD.

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

U.K. Lobby Cards (post 1 of 3)

Posted on 7th November 2016 in "Times Square"
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There were no lobby cards for Times Square in the US, only 8″ x 10″ black and white stills. The rest of the world was more fortunate.

At least eight lobby cards were released to theaters in the UK (although I suspect there was at least one more). Some of the photos hadn’t previously been used, as far as I know. The cards, like the aforementioned stills, measure 8″ x 10″, but the colors somehow give an impression of greater size.

Tim Curry as Johnny LaGuardia: Color 8"x10" lobby card, 1981  Text:  TIMES SQUARE AA Released by COLUMBIA - EMI - WARNER Distributors Limited. EMI A Member of the THORN EMI Group An EMI-ITC Production This copyright advertising material is licensed and not sold and is the property of National Screen Service Ltd. and upon completion of the exhibition for which it has been licensed it should be returned to National Screen Service Ltd. Printed in Great Britain.

 

 

This is the first time we’ve seen this photo of Tim Curry as Johnny LaGuardia, although it’s from the same session as TS-66-28/9 from the US Press Materials Folder; photo #4 from the UK Press Kit, which had been published in the Aquarian and Prevue; and the tiny photo from the Press Folder which was also used inside the soundtrack gatefold cover (except in the UK).

Trini Alvarado as Pamela Pearl: Color 8"x10" lobby card, 1981  Text:  TIMES SQUARE AA Released by COLUMBIA - EMI - WARNER Distributors Limited. EMI A Member of the THORN EMI Group An EMI-ITC Production This copyright advertising material is licensed and not sold and is the property of National Screen Service Ltd. and upon completion of the exhibition for which it has been licensed it should be returned to National Screen Service Ltd. Printed in Great Britain.

 

 

 

And, this is the first time we’ve seen a shot of Pammy from this early in the film. Even more unusually, Trini is looking directly into the camera. There are very few photos of the actors on set and in costume playing to the camera. This… um… is one of them.

Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado as Nicky and Pammy, on 42nd Street near 6th Avenue: Color 8"x10" lobby card, 1981 Text: TIMES SQUARE AA Released by COLUMBIA - EMI - WARNER Distributors Limited. EMI A Member of the THORN EMI Group An EMI-ITC Production This copyright advertising material is licensed and not sold and is the property of National Screen Service Ltd. and upon completion of the exhibition for which it has been licensed it should be returned to National Screen Service Ltd. Printed in Great Britain.

 

And here’s a photo we have seen before, of Nicky and Pammy walking west along 42nd Street, on their way to Times Square to look for Nicky’s dad. This shot appeared in the Press Folder, and as a black and white print on Kodak paper whose date and purpose I’m not entirely sure of. This is the most complete, uncropped, version of this image I’ve yet seen. (I do have a crummy-looking little .png file that shows a smidge more at the top and on the right, but cuts off some of the left and most of the bottom.) I’ve previously posted a version of it which been scanned by Baseline Research and posted by Cineplex, lacking the text strip at the bottom. They posted five images, four of which appear to be these lobby cards with the bottoms cropped off. I’ve already posted the fifth… but I won’t link to it or the others here because I intend to do it again at the end of this series.

 

Needless to say (but when have I let that stop me), none of these images match up to the film. Johnny smiles all through the shot his lobby card would appear to come from. We only see Pammy in her pajamas and headphones from outside her bedroom window. And as I’ve mentioned many times before, the sequence of Nicky and Pammy looking for and finding Nicky’s dad was removed entirely from the film, probably before it was finished being shot.

The cards all have this text at the bottom:

TIMES SQUARE AA
An EMI-ITC Production
EMI A Member of the THORN EMI Group
Released by COLUMBIA – EMI – WARNER Distributors Limited.
This copyright advertising material is licensed and not sold and is the property of National Screen Service Ltd. and upon completion of the exhibition for which it has been licensed it should be returned to National Screen Service Ltd. Printed in Great Britain.

 

 

[Tim Curry as Johnny LaGuardia]
[Trini Alvarado as Pamela Pearl]
[Robin Johnson and Trini Alvarado as Nicky and Pammy on 42nd Street near 6th Avenue]
Lobby cards (AAT ID: 300208593)
8 in (H) x 10 in. (W)
Great Britain (works);
Times_Square_UK_Lobby_Card-1_manual_crop_1080px.jpg
1080 px (W) x 857 px (H), 96 dpi, 512 kb
Times_Square_UK_Lobby_Card-2_manual_crop_1080px.jpg
1080 px (W) x 855 px (H), 96 dpi, 574 kb
Times_Square_UK_Lobby_Card-3_manual_crop_1080px.jpg
1080 px (W) x 854 px (H), 96 dpi, 609 kb (images)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square U.K. Quad Poster

Posted on 28th October 2016 in "Times Square"
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An edit of the Cummins illustration from the UK movie poster, with two different B&W stills. The "Cummins" signature is edited out. Text: TIMES SQUARE AA "GO SLEAZE!" ...IN TIMES SQUARE ROBERT STIGWOOD Presents "TIMES SQUARE" Starring TIM CURRY·TRINI ALVARADO And Introducing ROBIN JOHNSON Also Starring PETER COFFIELD·HERBERT BERGHOF·DAVID MARGULIES ANNA MARIA HORSFORD Executive Producers KEVIN McCORMICK·JOHN NICOLELLA Directed by ALAN MOYLE Produced by ROBERT STIGWOOD and JACOB BRACKMAN·Screenplay by JACOB BRACKMAN Story by ALAN MOYLE and LEANNE UNGER Associate Producer BILL OAKES An EMI-ITC Production Soundtrack available on RSO Records and TAPES RSO Released by COLUMBIA-EMI-WARNER Distributors Limited. EMI A Member of the THORN EMI Group. This copyright advertising material is licensed and not sold and is the Property of National Screen Service Ltd. and upon completion of the exhibition for which it has been licensed it should be returned to National Screen Service Ltd. PRINTED IN ENGLAND BY W. E. BERRY LTD. BRADFORD

 

A standard one-sheet movie poster is 40 inches high by 27 inches wide. A “quad” poster, which I don’t think they make anymore, is 40 inches wide by 30 inches high. EMI took this extra space and zoomed in on the top two-thirds of the painting, cutting it off just above the artist’s signature.

Overall it’s a more pleasing layout, with the credits in the lower left corner over the wet street, and the two inset photos next to each other in the lower right. The photo of Tim Curry has been changed to TS-66-28/8 from the US press kit and AFD Campaign Pressbook, and the photo of Pammy and Nicky is TS-72-8A/14, also from the US press kit and the Campaign Pressbook. Neither of these photos were in the UK Press Kit (at least not in my copy). Perhaps this poster was put together first, and when the one-sheet was designed the American stills were replaced with British ones.

This was the layout used for the newspaper and magazine theater advertisements for the movie’s run.

 

 

Times Square UK quad movie poster
poster, AAT ID: 300027221
30″ (H) x 40″ (W)
Inscription:
TIMES SQUARE AA
“GO SLEAZE!” …IN TIMES SQUARE
ROBERT STIGWOOD Presents "TIMES SQUARE"
Starring TIM CURRY·TRINI ALVARADO And Introducing ROBIN JOHNSON
Also Starring PETER COFFIELD·HERBERT BERGHOF·DAVID MARGULIES
ANNA MARIA HORSFORD
Executive Producers KEVIN McCORMICK·JOHN NICOLELLA
Directed by ALAN MOYLE Produced by ROBERT STIGWOOD and
JACOB BRACKMAN·Screenplay by JACOB BRACKMAN
Story by ALAN MOYLE and LEANNE UNGER
Associate Producer BILL OAKES An EMI-ITC Production
Soundtrack available on RSO Records and TAPES RSO
Released by COLUMBIA-EMI-WARNER Distributors Limited.
EMI A Member of the THORN EMI Group.
This copyright advertising material is licensed and not sold and is the Property of National Screen Service Ltd.
and upon completion of the exhibition for which it has been licensed it should be returned to National Screen Service Ltd.
PRINTED IN ENGLAND BY W. E. BERRY LTD. BRADFORD
(work)

1981 UK Quad Poster_1080px.jpg
1080 px (W) x 812 px (H), 96 dpi, 500 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square U.K. Movie Poster

Posted on 18th October 2016 in "Times Square"
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"Times Square" UK movie poster, featuring a painting by Cummins of Nicky over a collage of Times Square theater marquees Text: "GO SLEAZE!" ...IN TIMES SQUARE CUMMINS TIMES SQUARE ROBERT STIGWOOD Presents "TIMES SQUARE" Starring TIM CURRY·TRINI ALVARADO And Introducing ROBIN JOHNSON Also Starring PETER COFFIELD·HERBERT BERGHOF·DAVID MARGULIES·ANNA MARIA HORSFORD Executive Producers KEVIN McCORMICK·JOHN NICOLELLA Directed by ALAN MOYLE Produced by ROBERT STIGWOOD and JACOB BRACKMAN Screenplay by JACOB BRACKMAN Story by ALAN MOYLE and LEANNE UNGER Associate Producer BILL OAKES An EMI-ITC Production Soundtrack available on RSO Records and TAPES RSO Distributed by EMI Films Limited. EMI A Member of the THORN EMI Group. PRINTED IN ENGLAND BY W. E. BERRY LTD. BRADFORD


 

After all the work that went into creating the logo on the cover of the UK Press Kit, and the poster-worthy image that had been used to promote the movie’s production in the 21-28 June, 1980 Screen International, EMI went with this image for the UK movie poster. The painting of a frightfully gaunt Nicky, signed by “Cummins” (about whom I’ve been unable to find any information), was used for all the UK movie advertising, and for several of the other European posters. The film title and “‘Go Sleaze! …in Times Square” tagline are in a jagged faux-handwriting that’s probably supposed to look like graffiti, but doesn’t.

The small inset photos are the same ones used as insets on the inside of the UK Press Kit. The photo of Tim Curry is #4 from that Press Kit, previously published in The Aquarian in April 1980 and the September-October 1980 Prevue. The one of Robin and Trini is TS-22-11, or 1, from the UK Press Kit, depending on which copy I’ve pulled out first. The posters and ads that used this painting didn’t all use the same photos as the insets.

"Times Square" Screenplay by Jacob Brackman, 1979, 129 pp  Text:  1 EXT THE STARSHIP DISCOVERY NIGHT The hot ethnic nightclub on 42nd Street, near Port Authority. Flashily dressed kids mill around the door. NICKY, a dark skinny while girl dressed in a man's leather jacket and a biker's cap, walks through the area, ignoring the others. Her.air is deliberate She is about 16. She pulls a laundry cart. The camera follows NICKY around to the back of the club. She tries the door. It is locked. Very loud music is coming through the wall. NICKY unpacks a guitar, a frayed speaker-amp and a radio cassette player from the cart. Lashed into the cart is an old car battery to power it all. She starts playing along with the band inside the club. What she lacks in skill she makes up in imagination. Soon she is taking solo licks and posing for an imaginary audience. The music from inside flares as the back door of the club opens and an angry black ROADIE shouts to her. ROADIE What the fuck do you think you're doing? She ignores him. She juts her jaw out defiantly. He walks over, We can hear you inside. Get outta here. NICKY Do you own this land I'm standing on? Do you fuckin' own the airwaves around here? NICKY continues playing. Another man joins the first. 2nd ROADIE This is a restricted area. We're asking you politely to disappear. CONTINUED
Nicky is first described in the 1979 screenplay as a “dark, skinny white girl.” We know Robin didn’t fit Allan Moyle’s original idea of what his Nicky looked like, winning the part through sheer charisma and making it hers. It’s possible that Cummins was working from a combination of photos of Robin and earlier descriptions of Nicky, coming up with this angry, and hungry, creature of the streets.

 

 

Times Square UK one-sheet movie poster
one-sheet poster, AAT ID: 300196848
27″ (W) x 40″ (H)
Inscription:
"GO SLEAZE!" …IN TIMES SQUARE
CUMMINS
TIMES SQUARE
ROBERT STIGWOOD Presents "TIMES SQUARE" Starring TIM CURRY·TRINI ALVARADO And Introducing ROBIN JOHNSON Also Starring PETER COFFIELD·HERBERT BERGHOF·DAVID MARGULIES·ANNA MARIA HORSFORD
Executive Producers KEVIN McCORMICK·JOHN NICOLELLA Directed by ALAN MOYLE Produced by ROBERT STIGWOOD and JACOB BRACKMAN Screenplay by JACOB BRACKMAN
Story by ALAN MOYLE and LEANNE UNGER Associate Producer BILL OAKES An EMI-ITC Production Soundtrack available on RSO Records and TAPES RSO
Distributed by EMI Films Limited. EMI A Member of the THORN EMI Group.
PRINTED IN ENGLAND BY W. E. BERRY LTD. BRADFORD
(work)
1981 UK Poster_1080px.jpg
1080 px (H) x 734 px (W), 96 dpi, 396 kb (image)

 

TIMES SQUARE, p. 1
Screenplay by Jacob Brackman
1979

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square UK Press Kit (post 4 of 4)

Posted on 19th August 2016 in "Times Square"
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Here are the last photos from my copy of the UK Press Kit. They don’t have numbers that would match them up with the enclosed caption sheet, so I have doubts as to whether they were actually a part of it.

Trini Alvarado and Robin Johnson, in an unnumbered print from the "Times Square" UK press kit.  At first glance this looks like a collage but lightening the image gives the appearance that it is actually the two of them together.  Other photos of Robin in that outfit were taken by Mick Rock, so it's almost certain that this is a Mick Rock photo.  None of the captions on the caption sheet match up with the image.  The caption list omits numbers 9 and 10; however, there are three unidentified photos in this copy of the press kit.

 

This is the Mick Rock photo of Robin that appeared on the contents page of Film Review, Vol. 30 No. 10, October 1980. At first I thought that it was a collage of that and a photo of Trini, but I tried lightening up the background and it does indeed appear that they’re standing in the same room, on the same floor. Also, if you crop the photo to remove Trini, you lose a bit of Robin’s elbow, and that’s exactly how the Film Review version appears. What I’m getting at is, this is apparently a photograph of Trini Alvarado taken by Mick Rock.

 

 

Trini Alvarado and Robin Johnson atop the Times Square Theater marquee at the climax of the film, in an unnumbered print from the "Times Square" UK press kit. None of the captions on the caption sheet match up with the image. The caption list omits numbers 9 and 10; however, there are three unidentified photos in this copy of the press kit.

 

 

Trini and Robin atop the Times Square Theater marquee. This photo is labelled TS-22-32 in the style of the US publicity photos.

 

 

Trini Alvarado, Robin Johnson, and Tim Curry in a rare glamor shot, outside on or near Pier 56, in an unnumbered print from the "Times Square" UK press kit. The photo is identified by a code that matches the US publicity photos style, TS-88-29A. None of the captions on the caption sheet match up with the image. The caption list omits numbers 9 and 10; however, there are three unidentified photos in this copy of the press kit. Two of them (including this one) have US-style code numbers.

TS-88-29A, another of those rare publicity photos that doesn’t try to depict a scene from the film, although it obviously comes from the day they shot the scene where Johnny gets Pammy kicked out of the “hideout”. There was at least one other shot taken that day of these three smiling for the camera, which was printed in color in an Australian magazine in 1981, and later on the sleeve of the Japanese laserdisc in 1986.

UK "Times Square" publicity photo stamp (back of UK Press Kit Photo #7)

Back of UK Press Kit photo #7


The backs of these three photos are blank. The rest of the photos in the UK Press Kit are stamped “TIMES SQUARE” on the back.

An identical stamp is on the back of this photo I posted about previously, which just happens to have a tiny UK Press Kit-style “34” printed into it. It would seem there was a series of UK photos that numbered at least up to 34, and which were stamped on the back with the movie title. This doesn’t mean, however, that they were all used… there’s probably at least a 2 and a 6 floating around somewhere, to match up with the caption sheet, but there’s no reason to think there was ever a 9, 10, or anything between 11 and 34. I can hope, though… it’s been quiet lately but “new” items still turn up from time to time.

One problem with the stamp, though, is that it also appears on the back of the second copy of Photo #1, the one with the US-style number on it. It seems as though it, and the smaller pasted-in number are good indicators that a given print was made and used in the UK, but I don’t think we can conclude anything else from it.

To finish things off, here are the two versions of the shorter profile of Robin. Again, the version on “Times Square” letterhead appears to have been “translated” into British English, “there’s an ad” into “there was an advert” and so on. I doubt Robin has ever said “advert” in her life. (The text below is the “British” version.)

ROBIN JOHNSON (Nicky Marotta)

Before spending twelve weeks in front of the “Times Square” cameras, the closest Robin Johnson ever came to a film set was when “The Wanderers” shot a scene in her Brooklyn neighbourhood. In fact, 15 year-old Robin had had no previous acting experience when, as a result of a five-month nationwide search, she was discovered by a talent scout outside Brooklyn High School. “He told me there was an advert in the paper for a girl about l6, slenderish, blonde hair and street—tough,” Robin recalls. “So he gave me a number to call. I just did it for a kick. I didn’t expect nothin’ out of it.”

A native of Brooklyn, Robin is blessed with an incredible amount of energy, awareness and photogenic appeal – as well as a very distinctive voice. Her “street toughness” is no surprise, since she describes her own Brooklyn neighbourhood as “not rough rough – like you gotta carry a knife on you. You just got to watch out for yourself.”

1.65m (five-feet five inches) and 52kg (115 pounds), Robin has green eyes and naturally blonde hair which was dyed several shades of red for the role. Like her screen counterpart, she is a devout rock enthusiast whose favourites include Led Zeppelin, The Wh0 and The Rolling Stones.

Before filming ”TIMES SQUARE”, Robin’s ambition was to become a commercial artist, but now she is already a seasoned performer and will be featured singing on the soundtrack album released by RSO Records.

TIMES SQUARE is an EMI Films presentation distributed in the United Kingdom by Columbia-EMI-Warner, in North America by AFD (Associated Film Distribution) and throughout the rest of the world by EMI Films Limited.

 

 

TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_a
1080 px (H) x 864 px (W), 96 dpi, 154 kb (image)
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_b_TS-22-32
1080 px (W) x 864 px (H), 96 dpi, 302 kb (image)
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_c_TS-88-29A
1080 px (W) x 883 px (H), 96 dpi, 240 kb (image)
black and white photographic prints, 8 in (H) x 10 in (W) (works);

1980
inscriptions: [none]; TS-22-32; TS-88-29A
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_7 back
1080 px (H) x 864 px (W), 96 dpi, 44.9 kb (image)

 

ROBIN JOHNSON (Nicky Marotta) p. 1
8.5 in (W) x 11 in (H) (work);
1080 px (H) x 832 px (W), 96 dpi, 210 kb (image)

 

ROBIN JOHNSON (Nicky Marotta) p. 1-2
8.27 in (W) x 11.69 in (H) (works);
1080 px (H) x 755 px (W), 96 dpi, 279 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 755 px (W), 96 dpi, 59.2 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square UK Press Kit (post 3 of 4)

Posted on 9th August 2016 in "Times Square"
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First, some pictures.

Tim Curry as Johnny LaGuardia on the roof outside the WJAD studio, in the UK press kit photograph numbered 5.  This photo was taken a second before or after the photo numbered TS-79-28/8 in the US press kit.  The text from the press kit's photo captions page:  5. TIM CURRY stars as an all-night disc jockey, who, perched in his studio high above Times Square follows and encourages the progress of the runaway girls, who thanks to his efforts become minor media celebrities.

5. TIM CURRY stars as an all-night disc jockey, who, perched in his studio high above Times Square follows and encourages the progress of the runaway girls, who thanks to his efforts become minor media celebrities.

 

 

UK Press Kit photo #5 is another headshot of Tim Curry, this time as Johnny appears at the end of the film as he’s watching the concert though his telescope on the deck outside WJAD. The most interesting thing about this photo is, at first glance it looks like TS-79-28/8 from the US press kit, but it isn’t. It’s not just cropped differently; Tim’s head is tilted up slightly and he hasn’t got the beginnings of a smile he sports in the US photo. It’s a different photo, taken just before or just after.

Photos 6, 7, and 8 are pictures of Robin. Unfortunately I don’t have Photo 6, and none of the photos without the little number are of Robin alone.

Robin Johnson as Nicky Marotta atop the Times Square Theater marquee, in the UK press kit photograph numbered 7. The text from the press kit's photo captions page: 6/7/8. 15-year-old screen newcomer ROBIN JOHNSON stars as Nicky Marotta, a street-wise young runaway who, thanks to a radio DJ's patronage, is able to fulfil her fantasies of becoming a star of the "new wave".

6/7/8. 15-year-old screen newcomer ROBIN JOHNSON stars as Nicky Marotta, a street-wise young runaway who, thanks to a radio DJ’s patronage, is able to fulfil her fantasies of becoming a star of the “new wave”.


In Photo 7, Nicky kneels at the edge of the Times Square Theater marquee, deciding if she wants to perform or not. She never looks up in the film like she’s doing here, though, not without turning to look at Pammy or the Blondells. Perhaps she’s waiting here for a cue from Allan Moyle.
Robin Johnson as Nicky Marotta in the Cleo Club, in the UK press kit photograph numbered 8. The text from the press kit's photo captions page: 6/7/8. 15-year-old screen newcomer ROBIN JOHNSON stars as Nicky Marotta, a street-wise young runaway who, thanks to a radio DJ's patronage, is able to fulfil her fantasies of becoming a star of the "new wave".

6/7/8. 15-year-old screen newcomer ROBIN JOHNSON stars as Nicky Marotta, a street-wise young runaway who, thanks to a radio DJ’s patronage, is able to fulfil her fantasies of becoming a star of the “new wave”.

 

Photo 8 has Nicky scoping out the Cleo Club for Pammy, before revealing her attempt at poetry to her. This one is really close to the shot as it appears in the film, but it isn’t. The POV is slightly to the left of the movie camera, and although Robin is doing the same nervous finger-pulling, her hands are never in that exact position. This is the same almost-but-not-quite situation we saw with the shots of Trini from the later scene in the club where Mr. Pearl confronts Pammy.

I don’t have any photos numbered 9 or 10, and the caption sheet has no entries for them.

Trini Alvarado as Pamela Pearl, in the UK press kit photograph numbered 11. The text from the press kit's photo captions page: 11. TRINI ALVARADO, 12-year-old star of Robert Altman's RICH KIDS, is Pamela Pearl, daughter of a well-to-do New York family who runs away to find a new and exciting life in the city’s streets.

11. TRINI ALVARADO, 12-year-old star of Robert Altman’s RICH KIDS, is Pamela Pearl, daughter of a well-to-do New York family who runs away to find a new and exciting life in the city’s streets.

 

 

Photo 11 is a shot of Trini from the end of the same scene in the Cleo Club as Photo 8. In the film she never looks in thIS direction while smiling. Also, this photo has been lit in such a way as to make the background disappear entirely. The photographer took the opportunity to make this a true glamor portrait, not just an on-set publicity still. The glass on the table by her elbow shows that it was taken on the set, though.

Most of the photos in the UK Press Kit are very grainy and dusty compared to the US photos, as if they were printed from copies themselves. I’ve cleaned up the dust and scratches that were on the physical copy of the prints, but I’ve left most of the ones that were in the print itself, except the ones that were so huge I couldn’t stand to leave them.

There are two sets of text pages, and two profiles of Robin in each. The longer profile is almost the same as the one from the US press kit. Almost… but not quite. Aside from the slight rewording of nearly every sentence, this UK version spells Allan Moyle’s name correctly, where the US press kit and the film itself spell it “Alan”. The UK version describes Robin’s “discovery” on the steps of Brooklyn Tech in 1979 when she was 15 (which is accurate), and the US version has it happening in 1980 and gives her age as 16. I’m starting to wonder if the UK Press Kit wasn’t made up first, and the US version derived from it. (The photo captions also state Robin’s age as 15, which she was during the making of the film; she was 16 during its marketing.)

The only difference between the two sets in the UK Press Kit is that the text on the pages without the Times Square letterhead contain American spellings of words, and the pages with Times Square letterhead contain British spellings (“centers”/”centres”, etc.).

“TIMES SQUARE” STAR ROBIN JOHNSON IS A NATURAL

One day Brooklyn’s Technological High School’s front steps may be legendary as the spot where a star was “born”, a ’79 equivalent to Hollywood’s Schwab’s Drug Store, On those steps, smoking a cigarette while waiting for classes to begin, 15 —year—old ROBIN JOHNSON was discovered by a casting scout on the lookout for possible candidates for the lead in TIMES SQUARE.

“He gave me this card and said to call this number if I was interested in being in a movie,” Robin recalls in her inimitible Brooklyn-accented speech. “I thought ‘Oh! Another wise guy’, but gave it a try.”

What Robin didn’t know at the time was that director Allan Moyle, who had written the original story for TIMES SQUARE with Leanne Unger, was determined to cast only the young actress who would be precisely right for the crucial central role of Nicky Marotta, a gusty teenager, loose and without adult super- vision and determined to be a rock star.

The talent search had already bypassed many of the traditional avenues and gone to youth centres, punk clubs, and placed ads in papers like the Village Voice, Soho News, Aquarian. “We were looking for someone who WAS Nicky,” Moyle admits. “Robin’s definitely not that doomed child. Luckily for the picture, Robin’s brought a lot more humour to the character than I had originally envisioned.”

Without any previous experience – “I had sung in a choir when I was 12” – Robin won the role over literally thousands of other candidates. After being cast, she entered an intensive programme of coaching in singing and dance/movement. Making the film meant that the novice was quickly transformed into a seasoned professional. Robin worked seven days a week for three months, for as a minor, the new star had to continue her studies with a tutor on the set and more lessons on Saturday. On Sunday, recording or dancing demands would take up the day. The veteran members of the New York crew were impressed with the professionalism of both Robin and her even younger co-star, 13-year-old TRINI ALVARADO. Both exhibited an almost non-stop flow of dedication, energy, high spirits and raucous good humour.

Robin lives with her older sister Cindy and her mother, in- Brooklyn. Born on May 29th, 1964, Robin never gave any thought to becoming an actress until TIMES SQUARE.

Her inclination previously ran toward sketching (I’m not into landscapes; give me cartoons with some people in there “) and, whenever the opportunity arose, banging on drums. And although she first started dating when she was 11, she’s not worried about permanent relationships at this point in her life. “I’m closest with my sister Cindy, who’s a year older. We’re both Geminis and I like to argue, especially in a friendly way.”

Like many young women her age, Robin can identify with Nicky’s rebelliousness and non-conformity, traits which land Nicky in trouble with the law and into the arms of Rosie (ANNA MARIE HORSFORD), a concerned social worker. “Nicky can’t put things over on Rosie like she does with others,” Robin figures, “and that’s the reason she admires her. I have trouble with authority figures, too, which means anybody with the upper hand – like my mother or my teachers.” But for director Allan Moyle, who might be considered the supreme authority figure, Robin has only praise: “We’re alike in certain ways and that made it easier to relate. Allan’s absolutely brilliant for inspiration, for giving you energy for a scene. When he wants you to do a scene better, he gets you to think, not bullying or intimidating, I want to work with him again.”

Robin sees Nicky as a teenager who masks what she really feels and tried to make her real, “She was bitter about being abandoned. Her Dad’s a loser. All she can do is pity him, not be mad at him now. Nicky has a lot of gutsiness that I really admired. Her philosophy always was, ‘When you’re mad, show it’.”

Gutsiness is a trait Robin and Nicky have in common. Robin, besides being bright, witty and talented, is seemingly fearless, whether performing atop a 42nd Street theatre marquee or being dunked into the icy December water of the polluted Hudson River. “Nerves don’t get you anywhere,” she says.

Robin was coached for TIMES SQUARE by veteran Sue Seaton, who has worked with Katharine Hepburn and Gilda Radner, But that throaty timbre is unmistakably her own, perhaps a result of the ”Kool” cigarettes she smokes incessantly.

The closest Robin had ever been to a movie set before TIMES SQUARE was when a scene for “The Wanderers” was shot in her neighbourhood. Now, the world of movies is opening for her.

“Let me tell you about this movie business,” she says seriously. “There’s no right for anyone to get an attitude just because so many people are aware of your job. What I say is, it’s entertainment and it’s a job. I hope TIMES SQUARE does well, but it’s not the answer to my life. Most, I loved meeting and working with so many wonderful people.”

There is one confession she’ll make when prodded about the rigors of working in the realm of make-believe: “Oh yeah,” she says with a grimace, “chewing roses was pretty disgusting. I’d never tasted flowers before.”

Two things of interest, both in the credits as listed in the letterhead: first, the order of the cast. The film’s credits are “Starring TIM CURRY, TRINI ALVARADO, and introducing ROBIN JOHNSON as Nicky.” This letterhead’s credits read “Starring ROBIN JOHNSON, TRINI ALVARADO and TIM CURRY.” So, for a brief moment, Robin had top billing.

Second, I just noticed… all the promotional materials, as well as the film itself, misspell Leanne Ungar’s name “Unger”. Of course, in Moyle’s earlier film The Rubber Gun (1977), she had a music engineering credit that spelled her name “Lianne Ungen,” so I suppose this was a step up.

 

 

TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_5
1080 px (W) x 864 px (H), 96 dpi, 263 kb (image)
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_7
1080 px (W) x 864 px (H), 96 dpi, 260 kb (image)
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_8
1080 px (W) x 865 px (H), 96 dpi, 282 kb (image)
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_11
1080 px (W) x 865 px (H), 96 dpi, 245 kb (image)
black and white photographic prints, 8 in (H) x 10 in (W) (works);

1980
inscriptions: [on photos] 5; 7; 8; 11;
[on reverse] TIMES SQUARE

 

“TIMES SQUARE” STAR ROBIN JOHNSON IS A NATURAL, pp. 1-4
8.5 in (W) x 11 in (H) (works);
1080 px (H) x 832 px (W), 96 dpi, 238 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 832 px (W), 96 dpi, 200 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 832 px (W), 96 dpi, 233 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 832 px (W), 96 dpi, 115 kb (image)

 

“TIMES SQUARE” STAR ROBIN JOHNSON IS A NATURAL, pp. 1-3
8.27 in (W) x 11.69 in (H) (works);
1080 px (H) x 755 px (W), 96 dpi, 283 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 755 px (W), 96 dpi, 262 kb (image)
1080 px (H) x 755 px (W), 96 dpi, 254 kb (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

Times Square UK Press Kit (post 2 of 4)

Posted on 30th July 2016 in "Times Square"
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The UK press kit contains a photo caption sheet indicating that there should be 11 photos, and indeed there are, but they don’t match up with the captions. This is the main reason I don’t think my copy of the press kit is complete. On the other hand, it means there are a few photos in it that are complete bonuses, since I’ve never come across them elsewhere.

So, here’s Photo #1.

Nicky and Pammy about to enter the subway after escaping from the cop who chased them through the Adonis Theater. Version one of the first photo (best guess) from the UK TIMES SQUARE press kit. The text from the caption sheet: 1. ROBIN JOHNSON (left) and TRINI ALVARADO (right) as Nicky and Pamela, the teenage runaways who team up to roam the seamier streets of New York City.

1. ROBIN JOHNSON (left) and TRINI ALVARADO (right) as Nicky and Pamela, the teenage runaways who team up to roam the seamier streets of New York City.

We can tell it’s #1 because there’s a tiny “1” taped into the print, there at the lower right. But we immediately run into trouble, because although there’s no photo numbered “2”, Nicky and Pammy about to enter the subway after escaping from the cop who chased them through the Adonis Theater. Version two of the first photo from the UK TIMES SQUARE press kit. This version is cropped differently and has slightly lower contrast, and replaces the identification number "1" in the lower right corner with the US-style number TS-22-11 in the lower left.one of the remaining ten photos is this one:

Exactly the same picture! Except, it isn’t. It’s cropped differently: there’s less at the top and left and more on the right. It’s printed a little better, with less harsh contrast. And most importantly, there’s no little “1” taped into it. Instead, at the lower left it has the code number TS-22-11, in the style of the American press kit photos.

 

The caption for Photo 2 is: “2. TRINI ALVARADO and ROBIN JOHNSON join music’s ‘new wave’ as The Sleaze Sisters.” There are two photos that match up with that description, but neither of them have a “2” on them. One has no number at all, and one has US-publicity-style code printed on it. I’ll get to them later; for now, let’s skip to Photos 3 and 4.

 

A shot not appearing in the film, that would have belonged to the sequence where the girls look for Nicky's father. The caption from the UK Press Kit's photo descriptions page: 3. ROBIN JOHNSON (l) and TRINI ALVARADO (r), the two teenage runaways, become familiar figures in New York’s street society.

3. ROBIN JOHNSON (l) and TRINI ALVARADO (r), the two teenage runaways, become familiar figures in New York’s street society.

 

 

 

Photo 3 is another shot from the deleted scene of Nicky and Pammy searching for Nicky’s dad in Times Square. Considering the entire sequence was deleted and replaced by the short scene of the girls on the subway, there sure were a lot of photos taken. I wonder how much of it was actually filmed. Was there any footage taken of Nicky’s dad, and if so, who played him? And did the guy in this photo have a part in the film?

 

 

 

 

Tim Curry as Johnny LaGuardia in the WJAD studio, in the UK press kit photograph numbered 4. The text from the press kit's photo captions page: 4. TIM CURRY stars as an all-night disc jockey, who, perched in his studio high above Times Square follows and encourages the progress of the runaway girls, who thanks to his efforts become minor media celebrities.

4. TIM CURRY stars as an all-night disc jockey, who, perched in his studio high above Times Square follows and encourages the progress of the runaway girls, who thanks to his efforts become minor media celebrities.

 

 

 

 

 

While it doesn’t appear in the US press kit, we’ve seen Photo 4 before. It appeared in The Aquarian way back in April 1980, and then again in the September-October 1980 Mediascene Prevue, both times paired with a shot of the girls singing “Your Daughter Is One” that hasn’t yet turned up anywhere else. Both of those published versions have been cropped from this one.

 

 

Text:  TIMES SQUARE, a Robert Stigwood production, stars ROBIN JOHNSON, TRINI ALVARADO and TIM CURRY. Directed by Allan Moyle from a screenplay by Jacob Brackman, based on an original story by Moyle and Leanne Unger about two runaway girls and their adventures on the streets of New York0 Produced by Robert Stigwood and Jacob Brackman, with Kevin McCormick and John Nicolella as executive producers and Bill Oakes as associate producer.  TIMES SQUARE has been acquired by EMI for world-wide distribution.  1. ROBIN JOHNSON (left) and TRINI ALVARADO (right) as Nicky and Pamela, the teenage runaways who team up to roam the seamier streets of New York City.  2. TRINI ALVARADO and ROBIN JOHNSON join music's “new wave“ as The Sleaze Sisters.  3. ROBIN JOHNSON (l) and TRINI ALVARADO (r), the two teenage runaways, become familiar figures in New York’s street society.  4. TIM CURRY stars as an all-night disc jockey, who, perched in his studio high above Times Square follows and encourages the progress of the runaway girls, who thanks to his efforts become minor media celebrities.  5. TIM CURRY stars as an all-night disc jockey, who, perched in his studio high above TIMES SQUARE follows and encourages the progress of the runaway girls, who thanks to his efforts become minor media celebrities.  6/7/8.	15-year-old screen newcomer ROBIN JOHNSON stars as Nicky Marotta, a street-wise young runaway who, thanks to a radio DJ's patronage, is able to fulfil her fantasies of becoming a star of the "new wave".  11. TRINI ALVARADO, 12-year-old star of Robert Altman's RICH KIDS, is Pamela Pearl, daughter of a well-to-do New York family who runs away to find a new and exciting life in the city’s streets.

Here’s the full caption sheet. I have no photos numbered 2, 6, 9, or 10. There are no captions for photos numbered 9 or 10. I suppose it’s possible that there never were photos 9 and 10, and as this copy of the press kit went from person to person someone along the line stuck in 3 more photos to bring the total to 11 as the sheet implies. We may never know.

 

I do, however, have a photo numbered “34”. Which raises the question, are there photos numbered 12 to 33 somewhere out there?

 

[Added 18 June 2017: I recently acquired a photo numbered “29”, and in writing a post about it remembered that I have long had a photo numbered “36”. So, that may mean there even more UK publicity stills than I thought yet to turn up.]

 

 

 

TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo 1
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo 1a TS-22-11
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo 3
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo 4
black-and-white prints (photographs), AAT ID: 300128349; 8 in (H) x 10 in (W); 1980 (works);
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_1_1080px.jpg
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_1a_TS-22-11_1080px.jpg
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_3_1080px.jpg
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit photo_4_1080px.jpg
1080 px (W), 96 dpi (images);
 
TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit Caption Sheet, 8.27 in (W) × 11.7 in (H) (work);
1980 TIMES SQUARE UK Press Kit text page – 0042_1080px.jpg, 764 px (W) x 1080 px (H), 96 dpi, 2.227 KB (image)

 

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+