On Location

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A behind-the-scenes photo from "Times Square" showing the setup for a shot that does not appear in the film.
“The man with the walkie-talkie was the 1st assistant director, ‘Hoppy’ (that was his nick-name on the set).” — Robin

This is the only photo I’ve come across showing the production of Times Square. The assistant director’s full name is is Alan Hopkins. In the center are, of course, Robin and Trini Alvarado. All the way to the right, we can see half of director Allan Moyle.

This is the northwest corner of 42nd Street and 6th Avenue, looking east. The trees at the right are Bryant Park. The tracks in the street imply they were filming a traveling shot of the girls walking towards Times Square, but despite the fact that this shoot generated several publicity photographs, it doesn’t appear in the film.

I was going to spend the rest of this post speculating about where this shot would have gone in the movie, but I think I just figured it out, so you’ll just have to wait for the next post.

(Actually, come to think of it, there are at least two other pictures that show a little behind-the-scenes action… but neither of them scream “We’re making a movie!” like this one.)

 

 

 

Behind the scenes 68-24A
8 in (H) x 10 in (W) (work);
744 px (H) x 1080 px (W), 96 dpi, 537 kb (image)
1979/1980

[on back:] [handwritten:] 68-24A

Times Square ©1980 StudioCanal/Canal+

 

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